One of the news social media apps is copying the strategies of big name sites — censorship. TikTok, a wildly popular app that is managed by a sinister moderation system, is censoring posts about President Donald Trump, Christianity and the LGBT community, according to leaks sent to The Guardian.



“The free press that the founders envisioned looked a lot more like” Reddit. It didn’t look like New York Times writers who misrepresent basic tenets of free speech and demand censorship to protect their friends from “online harassment.” So said Donald Trump Jr. en route to arguing “the greatest threat to free speech and our democracy today is not the government, but the technology giants that deplatform people at the behest of liberals and then justify the action as ‘combating hate’ and making the internet somehow safer.”



Appearing on the Monday edition of the Fox Business Network’s Varney & Co., Media Research Center founder and president Brent Bozell tore into Twitter for being “like two-year-olds” with their attempt to lock Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s campaign account for sharing video of angry, far-left protesters last week outside his home threatening to inflict fatal harm on the Kentucky Republican.



Twitter’s initial decision to suspend the official campaign account of Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) caused a massive boycott of the site’s advertising platform from the GOP. After the senator told a radio station that the GOP was “in a major war with [Twitter],” the company backed down and restored Team Mitch’s account.



On Tuesday night, failed McCain/Palin campaign official, former Republican, and MSNBC’s Deadline: White House host Nicolle Wallace apologized for claiming during Monday’s show that President Donald Trump has been “talking about exterminating Latinos.” Wallace’s comments were first flagged by our very own contributing writer Mark Finkelstein.



The New York Times demonstrated its loathing for conservative social media activists, while skipping over some of its own inconvenient blind spots. The headline over reporter Kevin Roose's pre-meeting table-setter, “Trump Woos Social Media Influencers,” belied the story’s hostility, but the online headline accurately captured the tone: “Trump Rolls Out the Red Carpet for Right-Wing Social Media Trolls.” Yet the Times itself is no stranger to sucking up to hoaxters or spreading falsehoods about Republicans



The Thursday Social Media Summit at the White House will rally supporters of free speech. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.), who plans to attend the summit, has commented that he is “concerned there are people who work at the major technology platforms who want to put their thumb on the scale.” “All we want is a fair fight,” said Gaetz. “I guess in a sense if highlighting experiences and instances of bias will result in fewer moderations that present as bias, all the better.”



While YouTube has been panicking over one offended LGBT reporter, the platform’s overreaction has both sides outraged. YouTube announced a crackdown on Wednesday June 5 on videos promoting or glorifying racism and discrimination. However, in what appears to be the haphazard actions of a hastily deployed algorithm, even videos critiquing “hate speech” and conspiracy theories have been taken down or demonetized.



Democrats are threatening to regulate Big Tech. But they’re saying it while their pockets are stuffed with donations from these companies. The House Judiciary Committee announced it was having a hearing concerning “Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 1: The Free and Diverse Press.” The hearing will be held on June 11, at 2:00 pm.



On Tuesday night, Politico Magazine senior writer Michael Grunwald seemed to have inadvertently auditioned for a role on former Vice President Joe Biden’s campaign by offering a hilarious defense in light of news first reported by our friend Peter Hasson at the Daily Caller News Foundation that Biden’s environmental proposal “used nearly identical language from other sources in at least five different passages.”



Media Research Center President Brent Bozell on Monday starred in a PragerU video exposing the dangers of social media tech censorship. Bozell traced the history of companies like Apple, from rebelling against the old ways in the famous Apple 1984 Super Bowl commercial, to pushing conformity and squashing debate. Citing efforts to stifle speech, Bozell lamented, “Our former liberators now want to be our masters.... They are becoming the Big Brother Orwell foresaw. ”



The right to keep and bear arms is one of the many things that makes America a truly great place to live. But in a Wednesday Tweet responding to an NRATV video promoting a rape survivor who now carries a firearm, CNN host Chris Cuomo appeared to dismiss her empowerment with a flippant “Only in America” chide.