A Sunday item in the San Francisco Chronicle covered what reporter Justin Phillips has found is a major challenge for that city's restaurateurs. You see, many of them are struggling with how much virtue-signaling is appropriate in the wake of the election of Donald Trump and that city's defiant insistence on remaining an illegal-immigrant sanctuary. In light of a recent Harvard study on the effect of higher-than-market minimum wages and dismal jobs data from the government, restaurateurs and the press which covers this industry and several others need to look harder at another far more important issue: how many of these establishments will be unable to remain in business.



The combination of losing the House, and then the Senate, and then the presidency (to Donald Trump, of all people), while losing over 900 other legislative and executive branch seats in states throughout the land, has apparently led Tom Perez, the Democratic Party's new chairman, to believe that the party must curse its way back into power to properly motivate the faithful. Knowing that such a strategy would be poison if widely known, the establishment press failed to report audible and visible evidence of this strategy for over two weeks.



This is the closest Brian Williams will ever get to having a Pulitzer Prize: talking about them. Wrapping up Tuesday’s The 11th Hour on MSNBC, Williams joked with a hint of seriousness on the day the Pulitzers were awarded that the Trump presidency is known as “the 2017 Full Employment Act for Journalists.”



Folks, this is like McDonalds writing about how great the burgers at Wendy’s are. In Thursday’s print edition, The New York Times dithered away with a 750-word-plus story heaping praise on New York City competitor The Wall Street Journal for publishing a Wednesday editorial slamming the credibility of President Trump.

 



One would hope that the Washington Post, where the news masthead is "Democracy Dies in Darkness," and whose emails soliciting subscriptions tell recipients that "Democracy needs great journalism," searched far and wide for the most credible person they could possibly find to criticize the foreign-policy impact of how the Trump administration "twists the truth." Apparently, the best person they could find for the job was ... Susan Rice?



On Tuesday night, one of the crazier news nights since Election Day occurred when MSNBC host Rachel Maddow failed on a level akin to Geraldo Rivera and Al Capone’s vault when she falsely claimed to have a bombshell exclusive (that wasn’t hers) in the form of President Trump’s 2005 tax returns.



A week ago, the Columbus Dispatch reported that Wendy's, the fast-food chain, announced "plans to install self-ordering kiosks in 1,000 of its stores — about 16 percent of its locations — by the end of the year." Although company officials observed 18 months ago that such a move would be inevitable if the trend towards laws demanding far-above-market minimum wages continued, both J.D. Malone's Dispatch story and the Associated Press's condensed version based on Malone's work do not mention minimum wages at all.



On Morning Joe Tuesday, co-hosts Mika Brezinski and Joe Scarborough attacked White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon as a "Leninist," based on remarks Bannon made to political scholar Ron Radosh, who wrote about the 2013 interaction in an article for The Daily Beast. In an email to Radosh, Bannon denied the remarks.



The traditional media have decided not to take President Trump's insults lying down. After what may be the strongest -- and to his supporters -- most thrilling takedown of journalists by any president, Editor and Publisher magazine featured this headline: "Newspapers Aim to Ride 'Trump Bump' to Reach Readers, Advertisers."

 



You might call it The Media versus America. The President of the United States held a press conference on Thursday. On that, everyone agreed. But after that? Words like “unhinged” a particular favorite to describe the event. Here’s a sample of the headline reaction.The New York Times: An Aggrieved President Moves His Surrogates Aside, The Washington Post: Debrief: In an erratic performance, Trump shows his supporters who’s boss

 



During his press conference on Thursday, President Donald Trump stated: "The press is honestly out of control. The level of dishonesty is out of control." He also criticized the Cable News Network since “the tone is such hatred,” but he likes the "honorable" Fox & Friends morning program. The top Republican official got some support from an unexpected source the same day when Jim VandeHei and Mike Allen, co-founders of the new Axios website and former members of the Politico site's staff, posted an article entitled: “The Media IS the Opposition Party.”



Searches at the Associated Press, the New York Times and the Washington Post for stories in English on "monarca," the Spanish term for the monarch butterfly, currently come up empty. (There is a Post story in Spanish originating with the Associated Press, but it's about a drop in the number of those butterflies present in Mexico.) This absence isn't due to a lack of interest in the butterfly. It's because there's a lack of interest in telling the American people about a concerted effort by Mexico, codenamed Monarca, to slow or halt deportations of its citizens here in the U.S. illegally to a crawl by funding efforts to clog the U.S. court system to the point where it "break(s) down."