Folks, this is like McDonalds writing about how great the burgers at Wendy’s are. In Thursday’s print edition, The New York Times dithered away with a 750-word-plus story heaping praise on New York City competitor The Wall Street Journal for publishing a Wednesday editorial slamming the credibility of President Trump.

 


One would hope that the Washington Post, where the news masthead is "Democracy Dies in Darkness," and whose emails soliciting subscriptions tell recipients that "Democracy needs great journalism," searched far and wide for the most credible person they could possibly find to criticize the foreign-policy impact of how the Trump administration "twists the truth." Apparently, the best person they could find for the job was ... Susan Rice?


On Tuesday night, one of the crazier news nights since Election Day occurred when MSNBC host Rachel Maddow failed on a level akin to Geraldo Rivera and Al Capone’s vault when she falsely claimed to have a bombshell exclusive (that wasn’t hers) in the form of President Trump’s 2005 tax returns.


A week ago, the Columbus Dispatch reported that Wendy's, the fast-food chain, announced "plans to install self-ordering kiosks in 1,000 of its stores — about 16 percent of its locations — by the end of the year." Although company officials observed 18 months ago that such a move would be inevitable if the trend towards laws demanding far-above-market minimum wages continued, both J.D. Malone's Dispatch story and the Associated Press's condensed version based on Malone's work do not mention minimum wages at all.


The traditional media have decided not to take President Trump's insults lying down. After what may be the strongest -- and to his supporters -- most thrilling takedown of journalists by any president, Editor and Publisher magazine featured this headline: "Newspapers Aim to Ride 'Trump Bump' to Reach Readers, Advertisers."

 


You might call it The Media versus America. The President of the United States held a press conference on Thursday. On that, everyone agreed. But after that? Words like “unhinged” a particular favorite to describe the event. Here’s a sample of the headline reaction.The New York Times: An Aggrieved President Moves His Surrogates Aside, The Washington Post: Debrief: In an erratic performance, Trump shows his supporters who’s boss

 


Searches at the Associated Press, the New York Times and the Washington Post for stories in English on "monarca," the Spanish term for the monarch butterfly, currently come up empty. (There is a Post story in Spanish originating with the Associated Press, but it's about a drop in the number of those butterflies present in Mexico.) This absence isn't due to a lack of interest in the butterfly. It's because there's a lack of interest in telling the American people about a concerted effort by Mexico, codenamed Monarca, to slow or halt deportations of its citizens here in the U.S. illegally to a crawl by funding efforts to clog the U.S. court system to the point where it "break(s) down."


At the Associated Press, George P. Shultz, James A. Baker III and six other formerly despised Republicans and business leaders have suddenly become "GOP senior statesman." What accounts for this instant transformation? The group is pushing what it calls a "Conservative Case for Carbon Dividends.” In a Tuesday evening Wall Street Journal op-ed, Shultz and Baker advocated "a gradually increasing carbon tax" accompanied by massive redistributions of income. The AP's headline writers and reporters Catherine Lucey and Julie Pace could barely conceal their glee. In the process, they massively misrepresented the results of the Obama administration's efforts to build up "renewable energy from sources like solar."

 


On Wednesday’s Hardball, host Chris Matthews engaged in a fascinating debate with Stanford University’s Lanhee Chen on Supreme Court appointments and the Biden rule. But above all, Matthews lied that Obama appointee Merrick Garland “never got a conversation with a Republican” when Garland met with at least 16 Republican Senators.


Republican members of Congress met in Philadelphia last weekend for what was called a retreat. It might have been more accurately labeled an advance. Perhaps not since the days of Franklin Roosevelt's first term has so much been done by so few that will potentially impact so many (to paraphrase Winston Churchill in a completely different context).


Business people or companies who chose to endorse, donate or praise Donald Trump have been under attack from the left in recent months. Yet, the network news have failed to inform their viewers about it. The left took aim at L.L.Bean, Yuengling, New Balance and MyPillow for various forms of support  for President-Elect Donald Trump or for his proposed policies. Gay bars and other customers launched “mass boycotts” of Yuengling, and a national boycott movement emerged to punish other companies too.


Columnist Leonard Pitts is the latest liberal to mock Wall Street Journal editor Gerard Baker for putting the brakes on calling Donald Trump a “liar” on Sunday’s Meet the Press. Somehow, a sense of caution on Trump utterances equates to Holocaust comparisons. Pitts began his column:

“Five minutes for Hitler, five minutes for the Jews.”