Thank goodness for Colin Kaepernick. Without the one-time quarterback and full-time jerk out filing laughable collusion suits and steadfastly maintaining that he is entitled to play in the NFL, sports hacks like USA Today’s Jarrett Bell might have to write about sports.



Media outlets been hyping the recent increase in retail gas prices to nearly $3 per gallon, and primarily pinning the blame on President Trump's withdrawal from the Iran nuclear "deal." In 2012, when the price approached $4, CNN told readers that they "aren't as bad as you think," and that they weren't "a big drag on the economy" — and besides, according to the New York Times, "Gas prices are out of any president’s control."



In spite of recent media attempts to speculate about when the economy might experience another downturn, a recent survey of global businessmen found a majority anticipate the U.S. economy to remain strong over the the next three years. Zurich Insurance Group, EY, and the Atlantic Council surveyed 497 CFOs in 30 countries and found most of them confident about U.S. investment. The survey was ignored by ABC, CBS and NBC news programming between May 3 and 9, as well as The Washington Post, New York Times and USA Today, according to Nexis searches.



While observing World Press Freedom Day on May 3, MSNBC aired an advertisement encouraging viewers to watch not just that liberal channel, but also follow more than 25 other left-leaning sources and newspapers while not mentioning Fox, the most-watched news network on cable TV. The spot, which was created by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), begins by stating: “Don’t just watch MSNBC” and concludes with the motto: “Read more. Watch more. Understand more.”



If Nancy Armour (photo) has her way, the Super Bowl will become a battle of champions between the Constitution Supporters Conference and the Know Nothing Conference. The hard-Left writer for USA Today Sports says these conferences would be broken down between team owners who respect the free speech rights of protesting football players (CSC) and the ideologue owners who do not believe that all men were created equal (KNC). By any other name, it's a division based on social justice activism.



Imagine a newspaper editorial board calling a president "unfit to clean toilets" and then a few months later inviting that same president to write a guest column about the economy on that same editorial page. Say what? 



The GOP-passed tax legislation passed in late 2017, remains a centerpiece of the 2018 mid-term elections. One side will be praising it, the other attacking it. USA Today only seems to care about who backs one side of that battle.

Advertisements celebrating or attacking the tax bill were the focus of an April 17, USA Today front-page exclusive. It reported that “GOP groups and candidates have run nearly 17,800 spots this year that tout tax reform ... the barrage has forced Democrats to retaliate with commercials that slam the tax cuts as helping the wealthy — and endangering Medicare and Social Security in the years ahead.”



For backtracking on a previous promise to discontinue kneeling during the national anthem, Colin Kaepernick may have lost his chance to try out for the Seattle Seahawks. This reality could not dissuade USA Today's Dan Wolken that the notorious social justice warrior who went back on his word is anything other than a righteous man of impeccable character and the face of athlete activism. And a man for whom the protest movement he created is bigger than any back-up quarterbacking position that comes with strings attached.



You’ve probably heard already. April 10, was “Equal Pay Day,” a symbolic day media, politicians and celebrities use each year to complain about gender-based pay discrimination — by abusing a statistic that does not illustrate that.



The promoters of Saturday's March For Our Lives claimed that 800,000 attended the DC event. No one believes that — except USA Today, which was clinging to that inflated figure Sunday afternoon, well after more sober observers estimated a 75 percent smaller turnout.



Tuesday at the Louisville Courier Journal, part of Gannett's USA Today network, two reporters claimed that whoever vandalized a prominent billboard in that city to read "Kill the NRA" had "called out" the gun-rights group. David Harten and Darcy Costello never described the billboard as what it was while it was briefly visible: a violent threat.



On Thursday, USA Today headlined the possibility, with an accompanying video, that President Donald Trump might "be giving a speech to a empty room in Davos" on Friday. It didn't work out that way.