The front of Wednesday’s New York Times sported a 2,600-word enterprise piece by Katrin Bennhold with a peculiar focus on fellow journalists, those of the allegedly right-wing tabloid irresponsible variety: “Did Tabloids Cause ‘Brexit’? It’s Covered With Inky Fingerprints.”  Bennhold condescendingly blamed the right-wing tabloid press for Brexit (while her paper steadfastly denies its own pro-Clinton, anti-Trump slant throughout the last presidential campaign). 



The Associated Press and the New York Times were in London early this week for the funeral and memorial ceremonies for Keith Palmer, the police officer killed by Khalid Masood on March 22 as the radical Islamist attempted to make his way towards Westminster Palace after running down and killing four pedestrians and wounding dozens of others in a rented SUV. Strangely (no, not really), they've ignored several UK press reports showing that Masood, contrary to what was reported in the days immediately following the terror attack, was listed as the contact person at a radical Islamist website, had ties to a mosque that "that urges Muslims to take up arms," and virtually sequestered himself from the outside world — except the internet — for three months before carrying out his attack.



The establishment press, even as it works to censor known but inconvenient facts and shout down or constantly interrupt guests who attempt to present them, continually lectures new media, particularly center-right media, about the need for evidence before reporting or even discussing anything in print or on the air. There's hardly a better illustration of what a hypocritical stance this is than Lawrence O'Donnell's wild theory, recklessly speculated on Rachel Maddow's MSNBC show on Friday, that Vladimir Putin "might have orchestrated what happened in Syria this week" to benefit "his friend in the White House," Donald Trump.



There are many reasons to doubt the European Union's long-term continued existence in its current form, not the least of which is that its structure is, as a Friday Investor's Business Daily editorial asserted, "a virtual dictatorship for bureaucrats." As if that authoritarianism isn't enough, the EU Parliament can now financially penalize, censor and even memory-hole its own members' supposedly "offensive" speech — and it's fair to allege that their real objective, with media coopeartion, is to prevent the spread of populism under the guise of outlawing "racist" and "xenophobic" remarks.



At CPAC on Friday, Nigel Farage, a key leader of the "Leave" campaign which resulted in UK voters choosing in June 2016 to leave the European Union, reminded attendees and the world of something that the U.S. press has virtually failed to acknowledge: that then-U.S. President Obama was instrumental in his effort's success. Two months before the vote, Obama, in a UK speech, promised that a "Leave" victory would move the UK "to the back of the queue" in future trade negotiations — after which polling, which had shown "Remain" with a big lead, moved into a dead heat.



The Tuesday Morning Briefing at the New York Times tells us that President Donald Trump, at his rally in Melbourne, Florida on Saturday, "claimed that Sweden was experiencing a crisis because of immigration" and had "suggested that a terrorist attack had occurred there the night before." Concerning the latter, Trump said no such thing, nor did he "suggest" it. Concerning the former, if Sweden's not in crisis, it had a funny way of showing it Monday night, as there were riots in Stockholm.



The Women’s March on Washington’s message could not be clearer: “women” does not include pro-life women or women in the womb.



In June, when UK voters decided to leave the European Union in the "Brexit" referendum, the U.S. press told the American people that the UK economy would suffer greatly as a result. Moody's economist and max Hillary Clinton contributor Mark Zandi predicted that it would be "going down the rabbit hole." At CBS News, Mellody Hobson said that "they're acting as if a recession is a foregone conclusion."

It's one thing to predict a disaster that doesn't happen. It's quite another to predict bad news and have things turn out pretty darned well, which is thus far what has occurred. You'd never know it from reading U.S.-based establishment press coverage, but the UK economy, as reported in the UK Times, "ended last year as the strongest of the world’s advanced economies with growth accelerating in the six months after the Brexit vote."



On December 22, roughly eight hours before Anis Amri was killed by Italian police, Bouazza Ben Bouazza at the Associated Press published an item portraying the Berlin truck massacre attacker who killed at least 12 and injured almost 50 others as a "troubled" man who came to Europe "in hopes of a better life," but "fell into crime instead."

Later text completely refutes those opening claims, and the AP reporter provided no explanation as to why such obvious contradictions are present.



More fake news from the New York Times? On Thursday morning, the paper ran a credulous story by reporter Jonah Engel Bromwich on the alleged unjustified removal of two YouTube stars, including Internet provocateur Adam Saleh, from a Delta Airlines plane in London, for speaking Arabic on a cellphone while waiting to take off. “YouTube Stars Say They Were Removed From a Flight for Speaking Arabic.

The Times swallowed whole the dubious story from the notorious YouTuber, whose reputation has been built on video hoaxes purporting to uncover anti-Muslim bigotry...on planes. None of those facts seemed to trigger any skepticism among the journalists at the Times, who have been primed by Donald Trump’s victory to see Islamophobia around every corner and leaped eagerly on this fishy tale of bigots on a plane. Bromwich managed to find not a single skeptical passenger on the flight, while his colleagues at other papers found plenty.



Former (and fired) New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson, now a regular columnist for the left-wing British newspaper The Guardian, hypocritically dismissed three women who have accused Bill Clinton of sexual misconduct in “Did the Hillary Clinton intimidate Bill's accusers? Let's look at the evidence.” The subhead: “Trump has tried to distract attention from his misogyny by throwing the spotlight on Jones, Willey and Broaddrick. It’s a dishonest and devious tactic.” Abramson’s dismissal of sexual harassment charges against political figures is particularly hypocritical from the woman who co-wrote “Strange Justice,” a smear job on Justice Clarence Thomas that sided with his accuser, Anita Hill.



Yes, there in fact is a sex tape of Machado out there from Spanish TV. As noted here at Breitbart by Joel Pollak: "In 2005, Machado appeared on The Farm, a Spanish-language version of the Big Brother program. She had sex with the host of the show, even though she was engaged to Major League Baseball player Bobby Abreu of the Philadelphia Phillies at the time. Abreu called off the wedding after the humiliating episode aired on TV. Machado wrote of her new lover, according to the Sun: “He treats me like a goddess, he f***s me like a b****!” In 2006, she became the first Miss Universe to pose nude for Playboy, appearing in Playboy Mexico."