An upcoming tough-on-crime vigilante movie is now Exhibit A of “alt-right” racism, according to the reliably left-wing U.K. newspaper The Guardian. The remake of the popular 1974 action-family vengeance-drama Death Wish, with Bruce Willis cast in Charles Bronson’s shoes as the tormented hero, is scheduled for release around the Thanksgiving holiday. But is it just a fascist alt-right fantasy? Guardian critic Graeme Virtue piece was one long piece of virtue-signaling and throat-clearing, an apparent requirement for movie critics these days, not even getting around to addressing the entertainment value of a movie with content that may possibly offend some liberal interest group somewhere (months before it’s even coming out).



On Monday July 24, the parents of the terminally ill baby Charlie Gard released a statement that they would be withdrawing their petition to have their son treated. While many in the UK and across the world mourned the travesty and injustice of the court’s decision, others sought to justify the reasoning behind it. In a piece for The Guardian, UCL health professor, Ian Kennedy, expressed sympathy for the plight of Charlie, but ultimately justified it on the basis that “children do not belong to their parents.”



During the June 9th episode of Netflix’s Chelsea, titled “To England with Love,” Chelsea Handler travels to the United Kingdom. Her celebrity guest interview is with comedian and actor Eddie Izzard. Izzard professes to be a straight transgender guy, but “I’m a wanna be lesbian.”During the June 9th episode of Netflix’s Chelsea titled “To England with Love”, Chelsea Handler travels to the United Kingdom. Her celebrity guest interview is with comedian and actor Eddie Izzard. Izzard professes to be a straight transgender guy but “I’m a wannabe lesbian.”



In remarks so bizarre and out of touch that satirists at outlets like The Onion would have rejected them if someone had suggested their inclusion in a made-up story, London's police chief has described the diversity of the city's London Bridge terror attack victims and witnesses interviewed as positive things. Gregory Katz at the Associated Press did his part to play along with the charade by failing to identify the lack of diversity among those who carried out the attack.



MSNBC's Richard Lui appears to be testing the limits of irresponsible media coverage of terrorist incidents. Up until now, the press has fretted in the aftermath of such attacks about possible retaliations or "backlash" against Muslims or others not involved in them, even though such misguided revenge-seeking has rarely occurred. Saturday evening, Lui worried about police "overreacting" shortly after terror attacks in London which, as of the time of this post, had taken the lives of seven innocents and injured 48 others, including 21 critically.



The front of Wednesday’s New York Times sported a 2,600-word enterprise piece by Katrin Bennhold with a peculiar focus on fellow journalists, those of the allegedly right-wing tabloid irresponsible variety: “Did Tabloids Cause ‘Brexit’? It’s Covered With Inky Fingerprints.”  Bennhold condescendingly blamed the right-wing tabloid press for Brexit (while her paper steadfastly denies its own pro-Clinton, anti-Trump slant throughout the last presidential campaign). 



The Associated Press and the New York Times were in London early this week for the funeral and memorial ceremonies for Keith Palmer, the police officer killed by Khalid Masood on March 22 as the radical Islamist attempted to make his way towards Westminster Palace after running down and killing four pedestrians and wounding dozens of others in a rented SUV. Strangely (no, not really), they've ignored several UK press reports showing that Masood, contrary to what was reported in the days immediately following the terror attack, was listed as the contact person at a radical Islamist website, had ties to a mosque that "that urges Muslims to take up arms," and virtually sequestered himself from the outside world — except the internet — for three months before carrying out his attack.



The establishment press, even as it works to censor known but inconvenient facts and shout down or constantly interrupt guests who attempt to present them, continually lectures new media, particularly center-right media, about the need for evidence before reporting or even discussing anything in print or on the air. There's hardly a better illustration of what a hypocritical stance this is than Lawrence O'Donnell's wild theory, recklessly speculated on Rachel Maddow's MSNBC show on Friday, that Vladimir Putin "might have orchestrated what happened in Syria this week" to benefit "his friend in the White House," Donald Trump.



There are many reasons to doubt the European Union's long-term continued existence in its current form, not the least of which is that its structure is, as a Friday Investor's Business Daily editorial asserted, "a virtual dictatorship for bureaucrats." As if that authoritarianism isn't enough, the EU Parliament can now financially penalize, censor and even memory-hole its own members' supposedly "offensive" speech — and it's fair to allege that their real objective, with media coopeartion, is to prevent the spread of populism under the guise of outlawing "racist" and "xenophobic" remarks.



At CPAC on Friday, Nigel Farage, a key leader of the "Leave" campaign which resulted in UK voters choosing in June 2016 to leave the European Union, reminded attendees and the world of something that the U.S. press has virtually failed to acknowledge: that then-U.S. President Obama was instrumental in his effort's success. Two months before the vote, Obama, in a UK speech, promised that a "Leave" victory would move the UK "to the back of the queue" in future trade negotiations — after which polling, which had shown "Remain" with a big lead, moved into a dead heat.



The Tuesday Morning Briefing at the New York Times tells us that President Donald Trump, at his rally in Melbourne, Florida on Saturday, "claimed that Sweden was experiencing a crisis because of immigration" and had "suggested that a terrorist attack had occurred there the night before." Concerning the latter, Trump said no such thing, nor did he "suggest" it. Concerning the former, if Sweden's not in crisis, it had a funny way of showing it Monday night, as there were riots in Stockholm.



The Women’s March on Washington’s message could not be clearer: “women” does not include pro-life women or women in the womb.