WASHINGTON -- A fellow Spectatorian is under enemy fire, and we all must rally around him, particularly because he has done nothing wrong and because if those attacking him triumph, we shall all suffer. The cause is free speech. The free speech that is endangered is in Great Britain, but if the forces of censorship win in London, it is only a matter of time before the forces of censorship will be bringing their muzzles to our shores.



President Trump’s visit to the United Kingdom was accompanied by attacks on British Prime Minister Theresa May and London Mayor Sadiq Khan. Saturday’s “fact check” by New York Times London-based digital editor Palko Karasz took objection solely to the attacks on Khan: “Gauging London’s Record On Crime and Terrorism.” Karasz claimed to employ “expert analysis,” but actually made excuses and blamed the Conservative government, inequality, and “austerity” -- anything but the actual mayor of London.



Threatening and violent social media posts and overt actions against Trump administration officials and their families have escalated sharply in recent days. Apparently, some are taking the lack of outrage as permission for expanding the scope of their efforts. Thus, it's not enough to threaten the President's 12 year-old son Barron, as Peter Fonda did. This week, a Canadian TV writer threatened his four-year-old granddaughter. What's next? Cousins and in-laws? This incident has received some press coverage — in the UK, but virtually none in the U.S. establishment press.



Pictures may sometimes be worth 1,000 words, but they often either don't tell the whole story or tell a misleading one. Significant issues have emerged with what the press has read into the "iconic" photo taken of a crying two year-old taken at the U.S.-Mexico border by Getty Images photographer John Moore. The most important one, according to a UK Daily Mail interview with the girl's father left behind in Honduras with the couple's other three children, is that mother and daughter "were never separated by border control agents and remain together."



Venezuela's descent under Bolivarian socialist President and de facto dictator Nicolas Maduro has achieved yet another grim milestone. This time it's the return of polio, on top of other previously eradicated diseases including diphtheria, tuberculosis, measles, and malaria. The return of polio has caught the attention of some in the international press in the past few days, but only one of over a dozen related English stories found in early Monday afternoon Eastern Time Google News searches identified the nation or its leader as socialist. Also as of Monday afternoon, there was no coverage at major U.S. news outlets.



On Tuesday morning, UK and many international media outlets finally began reporting on the Friday arrest and imprisonment in England of anti-immigration activist and journalist Tommy Robinson. The delay of over three days in covering the story was due to out-of-control statism combined with journalistic cowardice.



The Guardian bolstered the proliferation of lawsuits against governments and companies over climate change by portraying them as incredibly significant. The left-wing British newspaper asked in all seriousness on March 20, “Can Climate Litigation Save the World?”



In an epic self-awareness fail, several liberal commentators claim that Broward County police officers who remained outside as Nikolas Cruz massacred students and teachers at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School were "good guys with a gun." This, they believe, shows that a good guy with a gun doesn't always stop a bad guy with a gun. It apparently hasn't occurred to them that these officers who swore an oath to protect and serve weren't being "good guys."



In its roughly 30th installment of "Red Century," a weekly series of op-eds dedicated to the notion that 20th century communism wasn't all that bad, the New York Times performed a bit of perhaps inadvertent recycling. On Monday, Helen Gao, in an item the Times appears to have had the good sense to keep out of its print edition, argued, with "crucial caveats" (but not enough of them) that "the Communist revolution taught Chinese women to dream big." Times columnist Nicholas Kristof infamously said much the same thing in 2005.



An upcoming tough-on-crime vigilante movie is now Exhibit A of “alt-right” racism, according to the reliably left-wing U.K. newspaper The Guardian. The remake of the popular 1974 action-family vengeance-drama Death Wish, with Bruce Willis cast in Charles Bronson’s shoes as the tormented hero, is scheduled for release around the Thanksgiving holiday. But is it just a fascist alt-right fantasy? Guardian critic Graeme Virtue piece was one long piece of virtue-signaling and throat-clearing, an apparent requirement for movie critics these days, not even getting around to addressing the entertainment value of a movie with content that may possibly offend some liberal interest group somewhere (months before it’s even coming out).



On Monday July 24, the parents of the terminally ill baby Charlie Gard released a statement that they would be withdrawing their petition to have their son treated. While many in the UK and across the world mourned the travesty and injustice of the court’s decision, others sought to justify the reasoning behind it. In a piece for The Guardian, UCL health professor, Ian Kennedy, expressed sympathy for the plight of Charlie, but ultimately justified it on the basis that “children do not belong to their parents.”



During the June 9th episode of Netflix’s Chelsea, titled “To England with Love,” Chelsea Handler travels to the United Kingdom. Her celebrity guest interview is with comedian and actor Eddie Izzard. Izzard professes to be a straight transgender guy, but “I’m a wanna be lesbian.”During the June 9th episode of Netflix’s Chelsea titled “To England with Love”, Chelsea Handler travels to the United Kingdom. Her celebrity guest interview is with comedian and actor Eddie Izzard. Izzard professes to be a straight transgender guy but “I’m a wannabe lesbian.”