Searches at the Associated Press, the New York Times and the Washington Post for stories in English on "monarca," the Spanish term for the monarch butterfly, currently come up empty. (There is a Post story in Spanish originating with the Associated Press, but it's about a drop in the number of those butterflies present in Mexico.) This absence isn't due to a lack of interest in the butterfly. It's because there's a lack of interest in telling the American people about a concerted effort by Mexico, codenamed Monarca, to slow or halt deportations of its citizens here in the U.S. illegally to a crawl by funding efforts to clog the U.S. court system to the point where it "break(s) down."



On Thursday, Fox News host Tucker Carlson confronted former Obama Department of Justice spokesman Matthew Miller for suggesting that Donald Trump’s presidency is illegitimate and the election was not  “fair and square.” Such debates have been catalysts for drawing eyeballs to Carlson’s eponymous FNC show and his promotion to 9:00 p.m. Eastern. That being said, this particular one didn’t disappoint. 



On Thursday's Tucker Carlson Tonight, Fox News host Tucker Carlson decried CNN Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter for insisting on his October 30 show that you should "triple check before you share" and then spreading on Twitter a YouTube hoax where prankster Adam Saleh claimed he was being thrown off a Delta Airlines flight merely for speaking Arabic. The airline and other passengers strongly disagreed with that attempted spin.

Carlson and Joe Concha, media reporter for The Hill, suggested Stelter was a left-wing advocate and Trump-basher and should just admit his biases and change the name of his show.



Thursday evening, Newsweek's Kurt Eichenwald appeared on Tucker Carlson's Fox News show. In a disgraceful performance which has to be seen to be believed, the obviously battle-prepped Eichenwald made an utter fool of himself. Apparently aware (or made aware) of how awful he was, he attempted to defend himself later Thursday in a 40-plus tweetstorm. It didn't help matters; the tweets were gone by 10 p.m.



The unsolicited "Step away from your Twitter account" advice Donald Trump is constantly receiving needs to be turned around on certain members of the media. One such person would be Kurt Eichenwald at Newsweek — except, as will be seen later, the magazine apparently lets him intemperately and obsessively tweet at will. In claiming that Donald Trump's victory rally audience in Iowa began booing at the mention of John Glenn, the first American astronaut to orbit the earth who died on Thursday.



While a guest on Wednesday's edition of the Fox News Channel's Tucker Carlson Tonight program, Mike Rowe --  a cable television host best known for his work on the Discovery Channel's Dirty Jobs program and the Somebody's Gotta Do It series on the Cable News Network -- criticized students at colleges and universities who burn the American flag because it's not persuasive to destroy “a symbol so many people care so much about.”

Noting that “nobody's disputing the right to do any of this stuff,” Rowe stated that burning the flag is “a great way to get attention, but I'm not personally convinced it's a great way to make people think differently” about what they believe and “how they feel” about the nation.



Did you know that some Donald Trump supporters actively advocated for repealing the 19th Amendment which gave women the right to vote almost a century ago? Or that Hillary Clinton, who memorably characterized half of Trump's supporters as "a basket of deplorables ... racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, you name it," really "went high" as "her opponent went even lower" during the presidential campaign?

By now, many people know that Newsweek, which prepared alternative "Madam President" and "President Trump" editions for its post-presidential election issue, accidentally sent 125,000 copies of the "Madam President" edition to newsstands on Election Night. But that's not the real news here. What is far less known, and far more disturbing, is that the pulled "Madam President" edition includes the outrageous contentions just cited, as well as others which will be seen shortly.



On the Friday edition of his Fox News show Tucker Carlson Tonight, the host interviewed New York Times Liz Spayd and challenged her on the anti-Trump bias of the paper. Spayd, the paper’s recently appointed ombudsman took her criticism of the Times’ journalism to what many of her colleagues see as enemy territory. She criticized the irresponsible tweets of some of the paper’s supposedly objective political reporters (“It’s outrageous”) and revealed whose opinion truly concerns the Times brass -- the good opinion of liberals: “....I think there’s a lot of angst and concern at Big Media organizations about whethere we’re going to get blamed by the left by, you know, the half of America that did not vote for Trump, for putting Trump in office."



At Roll Call on Tuesday, Jonathan Allen went after four-term Republican Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions with a vengeance. Even before Sessions had been nominated for a government position by President-Elect Donald Trump, Allen wrote that "the Senate should reject him for any post that requires confirmation," calling Sessions "a partially reconstructed baiter of minorities" who "is beyond the ideological fringe."

Friday evening, Tucker Carlson at Fox News went after Allen for his piece on Sessions after Trump nominated earlier in the day to be his administration's Attorney General. It did not go well for Allen — nor should it have, considering that they were discussing the alleged racism of a guy who, as a U.S. Attorney from 1981-1993 — until he, along with all 92 other U.S. Attorneys, was fired by Bill Clinton — helped virtually put the KKK out of business in Alabama.