In her Talking Points Memo column, Marcotte writes that King v. Burwell itself is ridiculous but par for the course: “Exploiting the obsessions and fantasies of rightwing cranks…has [been] the standard operating procedure of conservative leadership for decades now. But that the Supreme Court is elevating this kind of talk radio madness to the highest court in the land takes this to another level.”



Alana Levinson goes after Biden for his “lecherous” comments that fit “the classic definition of sexual harassment.” She admits that liberals generally overlook Biden’s boo-boos because “we like his politics. In terms of women’s issues, he’s got the gold stars…He’s pro-choice and…he introduced the Violence Against Women Act.”



Ed Kilgore (at Talking Points Memo) and Mark Kleiman (at the Washington Monthly) agree that the Republican party has a serious racism problem but differ on what the GOP could or will do about it.



Peter Dreier, who teaches at Occidental College, writes that “for decades, the NRA has fought every effort to get Congress and states to adopt reasonable laws that would make it much less likely that people like was [Ismaaiyl] Brinsley would be able to obtain a gun.” Dreier claims that even though the NRA’s “arguments are bogus,” it “has the money, and a small but committed hard core of members, to translate [its] idiot ideas into political clout to thwart even reasonable gun-control laws.”



In a Talking Points Memo piece, Ed Kilgore opines, “Even if the supply side of theocratic impulses in America is abating a bit, the demand side will boom” because of “a large and noisy Republican presidential nominating fight in which Christian Right resources will be a fiercely contested prize.”



The Talking Points Memo editor and publisher contends that no matter what right-wingers say, Obamacare is “almost certainly the most deeply scrutinized, discussed and argued over piece of legislation of the entire 20th century and early 21st century.”



Dylan Scott writes that “Gruber-mania has gripped the conservative mediasphere in a way that few stories have, becoming another brand-name controversy like Benghazi and the IRS,” and that “the larger meaning was baked into Gruber-gate -- there is a hashtag and Gruber can now be used as a verb -- almost immediately.”



Laura Kipnis of Northwestern University claims that “you can tell a lot about a man by what he thinks about Hillary, maybe even everything,” and that conservatives who’ve written biographies of her tend to be “guys with a lot of psychological baggage, emotional intensity, and messy inner lives.”



The Talking Points Memo editor and publisher claims that illegal immigration is similar to same-sex marriage in the sense that “even if you think those things are terrible it's very hard to find a victim. And it's even harder to explain why that victim is you.” He writes that it doesn’t make sense to argue that “anti-immigration Americans -- and let's be honest, mainly white people -- are oppressed in some way by having undocumented immigrants be able to walk around in the open and be able to work in the open.”



Josh Marshall writes that back in the day, right-wingers distorted the extent of media bias against them, and created FNC to balance the scales.



Ed Kilgore says conservative Christians don’t want to put up with unpleasant things like “equality” and “rights” and “government schools.”



Talking Points Memo’s Josh Marshall says Ernst’s ideas about localism and the ACA are “insane” and remind him of something you’d hear from “militia types.”