A Wall Street Journal columnist had strong words for the NY attorney general’s fight against ExxonMobil. “Their whole schtick now is to find enemies, and attack the enemies,” Journal columnist Holman Jenkins said of the climate change movement on Squawk Box Aug. 31.   



CNBC’s business news coverage took a humorous turn when Squawk Box anchors Joe Kernen and Andrew Ross Sorkin’s conversation turned to social media. On July 27, after reporting that Twitter shares were down following a disappointing quarter, Kernen revealed what he likes about Twitter and who he follows.
 



On the eve of the Democratic convention, CNBC’s Joe Kernen wanted to know why the media have failed to challenge Hillary Clinton on the issue of her personal wealth and the controversy surrounding the Clinton Foundation. Kernen, a Squawk Box co-anchor, pointed out that the media have been suspiciously silent on the subject of Clinton’s finances. During a discussion regarding a recent book about the Clintons, he referenced the two journalists who exposed the Watergate scandal: “Where’s Woodward and Bernstein on any of this?”



Shocking the whole world, the British people voted on June 23, to leave the European Union — a move nicknamed Brexit. Unexpectedly, the Leave voters won 52 to 48 percent. Although there was much anger at the decision, there were also plenty of voices cheering on the British on June 24. That chorus included CNBC On Air Editor Rick Santelli who acknowledged there would be economic ramifications, but cheered the UK for having the “backbone” to change direction and head “down the right road.”



Larry King apparently doesn’t want to face his biases. The veteran journalist appeared on CNBC, Tuesday, to insist that he’s “independent” and fair-minded. Yet, Squawk Box co-host Joe Kernan got King to admit he hasn’t voted for a Republican presidential candidate in almost 50 years. While discussing his likely support for Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump, Kernan quizzed, “Have you voted Republican in the past, Larry?” 



Following the Labor Department’s disappointing report that only 38,000 jobs were added in May, the Federal Reserve decided on June 15, 2016, they would not raise interest rates. CNBC Squawk Box co-anchor Joe Kernen reacted to the Fed’s decision the following morning. He criticized them for only raising interest rates once in the past nine years.



On CNBC's Squawk Box on Wednesday, Dan Rather somehow thought it was wise to offer criticism of the way the media has covered the 2016 presidential campaign so far. The former CBS anchor, whose career was crippled after the MemoGate scandal in 2004, asserted that there's "too much on the horse race, not enough on the substance of the race."



In spite of expectations that 160,000 jobs or more were added in May, the latest jobs report was a shocker showing just 38,000 job gains last month. CNBC’s Squawk Box panelists reacted live to that surprising Labor Department report on June 3, which showed that employment increased by a mere 38,000, while unemployment fell to 4.7 percent. However, low labor force participation continues to be a major economic problem.



CNBC anchor Joe Kernen tore into the prospect of a socialist president, and knocked young people who he said had a warped view of Bernie Sanders. Kernen’s comments came in response to a report by political correspondent John Harwood on the democratic presidential race. In his report, Harwood featured a poll that had Sanders losing to Clinton by 14 percentage points.



CNBC anchors Joe Kernen and Michelle Caruso Cabrera poked fun at socialism, saying it equalized results, but made everything worse.

Cabrera said on Squawk Box May 12, that socialism brought about “equal suffering,” while Kernen similarly remarked that it represented “equally-shared misery.”



Buffett executive Charlie Munger ridiculed the prospect of Trump and Cruz nominations during a CNBC appearance, by comparing their campaigns to a hopeless charge made during the Crimean War.

His comments came in response to Squawk Box host Becky Quick’s question on May 3, 2016, about his take on the state of the Republican party.



The transgender CEO of United Therapeutics said the company disapproved of North Carolina’s transgender bathroom law, which CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin described as “anti-LGBT.”

Squawk Box host Sorkin asked CEO Martine Rothblatt on April 7, 2016, about the state’s new law restricting transgender access to bathrooms of their choosing. Rothblatt reported that United Therapeutics opposed the law, and expressed confidence that legislation would move in a “progressive direction.”