"Sorry for the inconvenience, sports fans, but the days of the docile black athlete are over. This isn’t a time to stick to sports. This isn’t a time to be afraid because Kaepernick has been blackballed." These are the words of Washington Post sports writer Jerry Brewer, who believes racists are feeling empowered and whites are mistaken to think we live in a post-racial society.


Racial cleansers in Boston are setting their sights on Yawkey Way, the street leading into Fenway Park. The late Thomas Yawkey, who owned the Boston Red Sox baseball team from 1933 to 1976, was apparently a racist and now his memory must be expunged and the street renamed. However, in typical hypocritical liberal fashion, Yawkey Trust money is still good for the getting.


Colin Kaepernick's protest during the 2016 NFL season is on the verge of getting dwarfed. This weekend's start of NFL preseason games and the left-stream media narrative that President Trump failed to "condemn far-right demonstrators" at Charlottesville has ignited a heightened new state of athlete protests.


Earlier this week, The Undefeated blogsite conducted a push poll on Colin Kaepernick disguised as a man-on-the-street interview, and it didn't go as well as the libs had hoped. The ESPN affiliate is backing Kaepernick's anti-American protests 100 percent and obviously hoped to use random people to support its cause.


Not even the left-stream media can keep a good man down. Viciously attacked by liberal sports media in the spring for receiving a minor league baseball contract from the New York Mets, Tim Tebow is now winning them over by proving he is a legitimate professional baseball player. He's also gaining applause for hitting a homer for an ailing boy in Babe Ruthian style.


It matters not whether one is a Super Bowl champion like Tom Brady or a lesser quarterback like Jay Cutler. If you support President Donald Trump, the sports media will disparage you for guilt by association. Brady experienced this for several months, and now that Miami passed over media favorite Colin Kaepernick for Jay Cutler, the latter is prime for criticism.


Growing more impatient with each passing day of NFL training camp, Colin Kaepernick apologists in the media are now pitching their "entitlement tent" in Baltimore. There, the Ravens are razor thin at the quarterback position, and these media believe the team owes Kaepernick a rich contract.


Another pillar of the Obama Administration fell today when President Trump banned transgenders from serving in the U.S. military, and two former athletes are crying foul in The Washington Post. Des Bieler gave former Olympic decathlon champion Bruce (nee Caitlyn) Jenner and retired NBA sharpshooter Ray Allen a forum for blasting the president today.


To the left-stream media, when it comes to social issues every coin has only one side. As a revived bathroom bill winds its way through the Texas Legislature, media activists are going into hyper-drive to fight it for their LGBT allies.


Retired NFL quarterback Michael Vick continues to draw backlash for his comments Monday that it would be in Colin Kaepernick’s best interests to clip his hair and become more “presentable.” SB Nation writer Tyler Tynes posted one of the strongest disagreements yet by claiming that Vick is advocating for “respectability politics” and white oppression.


Colin Kaepernick's Afro hairstyle is all the media rage today. Perhaps, not since the musical "Hair" opened on Broadway in 1968 has the media made so much of someone's hairstyle. On Monday, retired football star Michael Vick said it would be a good idea for Kaepernick to sharpen up his image by cutting his hair and making himself more "presentable" to potential NFL suitors. Indignant Left-stream media erupted with disapproval, and Kaepernick himself tweeted a strong response.


Hootie Johnson, former chairman of the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga., home of The Master’s Golf Tournament, died on Friday at age 86. The New York Times recognized him in an obituary by Richard Goldstein and could not resist getting in last swings at its unlikely foe. In 2002-03, Johnson was in the paper’s cross-hairs for refusing to admit women members to Augusta National. In a notorious editorial in November 2002, “America’s All-Male Golfing Society,” obsessive anti-Augusta crusader and Times executive editor Howell Raines even suggested Tiger Woods, then king of the golf world, boycott the tournament in solidarity. Raines targeted CBS as well, which had the broadcast rights to the tournament, and did multiple stories, many on the front page, keeping the pressure on CBS and Augusta National.