The idea of actually covering sports has become so passé for two iconic sports media organizations that they've devolved into a lusty competition to determine which can one-down the other in so-called artistic nudity. ESPN presents full buff arrays of athletes "performing" their respective sport, and Sports Illustrated is pulling out every PC trick in the book -- hijabs and burkinis, painted ladies and politically correct subjects bearing virtue messages on their naked flesh -- to gain attention. All in the name of progressive art moving sport and society forward toward the nirvana of diversity.



Special Olympics (SO) not only does a great job of providing programs for the mentally and physically impaired, but also excels at fundraising from non-government sources. SO raises 90 percent of its funding, but when U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos proposed ending federal funding, ESPN and Sports Illustrated pushed back hard against the Trump Administration.



"The information universe is in a state of constant evolution, but the sports background of any controversial figure is almost always irrelevant." This statement appears at the end of Tim Layden's hypocritical Sports Illustrated criticism of acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker (appearing in photograph) and Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. The ironic thing is that Layden specifically focused on the sports background of both men. The appalling thing is that Layden lumps the sports backgrounds of Whitaker and Kavanaugh in with those of despicable criminals — a rapist and a terrorist.



Kudos to Sports Illustrated.for coming up with a creative new awards ceremony format in which a real-life heroine is introduced by the actress who played her on TV. That’s the only possible rationale for having Christine Blasey Ford involved in a ceremony honoring Rachel Denhollander.



For a few years now, social justice activism has been used to determine Sports Illustrated's "Sportsperson of the Year" award. The Golden State Warriors' entire team is this year's winner, and though they've won three NBA championships in the last four years, that simple fact didn't seem to weigh heavily into SI's decision. "Matters beyond basketball" did, according to Alaa Abdeldaiem, a breaking news writer at SI.



In the aftermath of recent mass shootings, professional teams and athletes are pondering how they can mobilize for gun control. Sports Illustrated writer Alex Prewitt is cheering them on from the press box and offering advice on how they can take the guns out of Americans' hands.



Almost without exception when NBA luminaries get political, it's the Republicans who take the "hard foul." Los Angeles Clippers' head coach Doc Rivers says he disagrees with virtually everything President Donald Trump says, and he believes the president deserves a "technical foul" for worsening the nation's racial divide. Rivers' political remarks appeared in an interview with Sports Illustrated's Justin Barrasso.



Against the backdrop of Nike rolling out its highly controversial new Colin Kaepernick "Just Do It" campaign during last night's NFL season opener, Sports Illustrated's Jacob Feldman has declared victory for fans urging media to "stick to sports." Gosh, he could have fooled the world with such a wild claim!



Sports Illustrated legal writer Michael McCann, an associate dean of law at the University of New Hampshire School of Law, seems to want Colin Kaepernick to win his collusion lawsuit against the NFL just a "little" too badly. And at the expense of Denver Broncos' general manager John Elway. McCann offers eight ways that could happen, but isn't very convincing or objective in his arguments.



Sports Illustrated's Michael McKnight has written a 4,200-word feature story on the Miami Dolphins' Robert Quinn, the face of Thursday night's NFL protests after a photo of him standing with raised fist was widely circulated by media. Quinn is portrayed as a charitable man who wants to unite America by protesting the national anthem. Quinn says he wants the finger pointing to stop, yet tears down the nation.



The NFL's new anthem policy is an ill-conceived move that plays right into the hands of a president who demonizes the league to rile up his supporters, writes Sports Illustrated's Trump-hating, flag-hating Charles Pierce. Furthermore, Pierce compares the anthem policy and Trump remarks on the NFL to 20th century British tyranny.



Wimbledon tennis play is upon us, and along with it, a perfect time for Sports Illustrated to talk politics and slam the Trump Administration in an interview with lesbian firebrand Martina Navratilova (see file photo)! The nine-time Wimbledon champion gave the LGBT movement free publicity and bashed America's top two elected officials for taking human rights backwards.