"Fact-checking" site. 

Snopes.com doubled down on two of their regular themes on Thursday: defending Rep. Ilhan Omar and attacking the Christian satire site The Babylon Bee. Snopes insisted no one would be able to figure out Omar didn't say "If Israel is so innocent, they why do they inisist on being Jews?"



Sometimes, the fact checkers pick the wrong fact to check. See Snopes.com on Joe Biden. Their latest Biden article explored whether Biden actually said he had "no empathy" for the young generations. Snopes was aiming low by fact-checking a tweet by a left-winger's account that had 958 followers. "IbrahimAS97" described himself as "a person within whom a profound hatred of centrist democrats resides."



Snopes.com claims to be a fact-checking website, but its recent rash of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez defense items suggests it's a liberal clickbait site. There's five items just in the first 15 days of April. None of them evaluate if AOC mangled facts. They're all on defense. 



Twitchy asks an obvious question: Why does Snopes.com "keep doing fact-checking articles nobody thinks are real, especially one with easy-to-find disclaimers?" The latest example of Snopes feeling the need to do a "satire check" is a doozy:  “Did a Brave Millennial Sell His Testicles to Raise Money for Bernie’s 2020 Campaign?” If you wonder if this could be true, you should probably not be voting. Let's guess that the answer to Twitchy's question is "clickbait." 



Here we go again! Snopes.com is slamming an obvious Babylon Bee parody with the "False" label. They asked "Was ‘Empire’ Actor Jussie Smollett Offered a Job at CNN?" Dan Evon of Snopes felt the urgent need to warn "This was not a genuine news story, although some readers mistook it for such." 



Peter Hasson at the Daily Caller reported the liberal “fact checking” website Snopes.com acted like it couldn’t find the facts on Indian activist Nathan Phillips lying about serving in Vietnam. Snopes phrased it this way on their home page: “Did Nathan Phillips Falsely Claim He Was a Vietnam Veteran? Nuances frequently get lost amidst social media uproar and hastily filed news reports.” But it’s Snopes that can’t locate the evidence. They bizarrely rated it “Unproven” that Phillips lied about serving “in theater” in Vietnam.



Peter Hasson at the Daily Caller made the Drudge Report on Thursday underlining how Snopes.com, "a left-leaning fact-checking website given preferential treatment by Facebook and Google, botched its fact-check of a viral meme that was mocked within political circles for spreading false information." Politico reporter Jake Sherman called the meme "insane fake news."



Young liberal congressman Eric Swalwell of California is an cable TV regular and has been hailed for his social-media prowess. He's even touted by some as 2020 presidential timber. That image took a hit on November 16, when Swalwell responded to gun-rights activists on Twitter saying you will never take my guns with "It will be a short war, my friend. The government has nukes. Too many of them, but they're legit." The networks skipped that gaffe, of course. And the "independent fact checkers" at Snopes.com lamely tried to come to Swalwell's defense.



Snopes.com keeps attacking conservative website articles as "False" when the facts favor the conservatives. On November 9, these "fact checkers" tagged LifeNews.com as "False" for a headline that said "Arizona Senate Candidate Kyrsten Sinema Voted to Allow Abortions Up to Birth."



Those "independent fact checkers" at Snopes threw a red flag at conservative websites like the Daily Wire for a "mixture" of truth and falsehood on the question "Is San Francisco Registering ‘Illegal Aliens’ to Vote?" You have to get a kick out of the objection to the I-word and the A-word. They prefer "non-citizens." We wouldn't call their site "non-partisan."  This is their breakdown, and as you can see, they object to what it sounds like, not how accurate it is: 



Snopes.com has once again created fact-check fiction. On Friday, the site's Kim LaCapria contended that the press has "consistently reported" that the girl photographed by Getty Images' John Moore "was never separated from her mother," and that any claim to the contrary is "Mostly False." There is more evidence than one can even hope to chronicle that it is LaCapria's claim which is false.



On Monday evening Pacific Time, former Washington Post reporter Jose Antonio Vargas posted a photo on Twitter of children inside a cage. He assumed that the photo depicted unaccompanied illegal-immigrant children recently detained by ICE. He was wrong; but as of late Wednesday morning, he has from all appearances only indirectly admitted his error. An alleged "fact-check" at Snopes.com would not declare that Vargas's obviously fake-news tweet was false. Instead, it absurdly declared that the photo involved had only been "Miscaptioned."