Recently, a couple media outlets have published stories pondering a mysterious thought: Are people getting tired of our 9-to-5 Trump bashing, and would they rather us tell jokes that aren’t just cheap shots at conservatives? Vice writer Harry Cheadle wondered the same thing when he published an article titled, “‘SNL’ Cold Opens Are Unfunny, Elitist Pieces of Liberal Propaganda.”



Appearing on Wednesday’s NBC Today show to promote the Tribecca Film Festival, actor Robert De Niro also happily discussed his cameo on Saturday Night Live portraying Special Counsel Robert Mueller, even hoping for future skits where he could arrest Donald Trump and throw him jail.



Hollywood doesn’t really wield as much political influence as it thinks it does. But the media have apparently bought the tinsel-covered lie.



I don’t know who got the bright idea to air a “sneak peek” of ABC’s newest late night talk show Sundays with Alec Baldwin on Oscar night, but with the live Academy Awards running 50 minutes late, plus local news, the show didn’t start on the East Coast until about 12:30am. This was doubly was unfortunate for Baldwin – the few people still up watching TV at that hour were quickly put to sleep by this snooze-fest.



Charles Barkley played to adoring reviews from left-stream online media in his fourth appearance on Saturday Night Live this weekend. Barkley took on gun rights advocates and opponents of athlete protests, leading SBNation's James Dator to write that he "perfectly mixed humor and his message on athlete protests." Slate's Matthew Dessem focused on a segment deriding the NRA's plan to solve school shootings by throwing more guns at the problem and comparing Second Amendment advocates to "cockroaches."



Alec Baldwin is back again on Saturday Night Live, depicting an ignorant and buffoonish Donald Trump to the besotted hosts of Fox & Friends in last night's opening skit.

"Mr. President, can I say, your speech was maybe the best speech in the history of this country!" gushed SNL's Heidi Gardner as Fox's Ainsley Earhardt, referring to the State of the Union address. Baldwin's Trump quickly agreed, boasting that "a lot of folks" including Paul Ryan said "it was better than Martin Luther King's 'I Dream of Jeannie' speech."



The entertainment world has readied the battlefield for the resistance with scripted and unscripted shows.



In Wednesday's New York Times, three reporters reflected on "how Washington insiders are viewing pop culture" in 2017. The most interesting take was that the Saturday Night Live "Alec Baldwin bits" on Trump this year haven't "drawn a ton of blood" in Washington. Their mockery of female Trump aides also failed to score with insiders, they declared.



Saturday Night Live comedian Kate McKinnon admitted on NBC’s Tonight Show Tuesday that she had a public meltdown when she heard that Hillary Clinton mentioned her in her election memoir. “I sank to my knees,” McKinnon admitted to host Jimmy Fallon, “So I would always remember that moment,” she gushed.



Why do people who identify as feminist betray themselves when men aligned with them are accused of the worst?

The women of Saturday Night Live released a statement “Offer[ing] Solidarity in Support of Al Franken.” In their statement, assistants, writers, photographers, and cast members stated that they “are moved to quickly and directly affirm that after years of working with him, we would like to acknowledge that not one of us ever experienced any inappropriate behavior; and mention our sincere appreciation that he treated each of us with the utmost respect and regard.”



PolitiFact's "Truth-O-Meter" is an incredibly fickle instrument. It depends on who the liberals at PolitiFact want to paint as "True" and who they want to shame as "False." Bryan White at the blog PolitiFact Bias reports that in "fact checks" that were six days apart, PolitiFact demonstrated how two similarly un-enforced laws drew very different verdicts. 



After taking a week to slam alleged sexual predator Harvey Weinstein, NBC’s Saturday Night Live poured great detail into a skit that mocked White House adviser Kellyanne Conway as a loon and for her makeup. In a skit resembling the hit movie remake of Stephen King’s “IT,” comedian Alex Moffat played CNN’s Anderson Cooper who was being lured into the sewer by Kate McKinnon, who played Kellyanne Conway.