It’s really, really hard for many in the media to put politics aside, even when asking the president questions about the coronavirus. That was obvious during today’s press conference where President Trump fielded condescending questions from reporters questioning his credibility, and if his supporters actually follow medical advice.



A Canadian website reports the Reuters wire service was forced to retract a false story on the Texas church shooter. The fake news was picked up by The New York Times and Canada's National Post. The incorrect Reuters article read: “The gunman who opened fire in a Texas church on Sunday, killing two before dying from gunshot wounds, owned a shooting range and had taught its parishioners how to shoot, the Texas Attorney General said on Monday.” In reality, the man who shot the church shooter is the owner of a shooting range. 



Timing is everything for living legend Clint Eastwood The actor/director served up American Sniper after Hollywood stopped firing cinematic shots at the U.S. Military. The results? Sniper earned $350 million at the U.S. box office. Two years later Eastwood directed Sully, just when movie goers craved a true American hero story. That movie hauled in $125 million domestically.



Liberals complain about Big Tech platforms that allow for free and unfettered speech in political advertising. It seems as though some of these companies are listening. Google announced on Nov. 20 that it was restricting microtargeting on election ads on the platform.



A lawsuit against Facebook has ended in a loss for the massive social media platform. Reuters reported that a federal court ruled against Facebook, declaring that it illegally collected and stored biometric data of users without their consent. Shawn Williams, the lawyer representing the plaintiffs, said “This biometric data is so sensitive that if it is compromised, there is simply no recourse.



Even though some high-profile experts claim the U.S. is not headed for a recession right now, the liberal news media continued to promote economic pessimism during the summer of 2019.

Despite 3.7 percent (near record-low) unemployment, wage gains, confident consumers and growing economy, liberal journalists obsessed over recession every single day of June and July.



Big Tech companies say Iranian hackers used social media to interfere with the American 2018 midterm election. A group of anonymous hackers infiltrated social media sites in April 2018 to influence the midterm elections. According to prominent public cybersecurity firm FireEye’s report these fake accounts had a very clear mission to spread “anti-Saudi, anti-Israeli, and pro-Palestinian themes.” Reuters recounted how Lee Foster, a FireEye researcher, claimed that many of these accounts had impersonated American journalists. They “had successfully convinced several U.S. news outlets to publish letters to the editor, guest columns and blog posts.”



Earlier this week, the White House Correspondents’ Association (WHCA) announced its 2019 award winners ahead of the liberal media’s asinine evening of bloated nonsense at the WHCA’s dinner on April 27. While some of the award winners and honorable mentions were for serious works of journalism, The Washington Post winning for breaking the “shithole countries” story and CNN’s Kavanaugh coverage fetching an honorable mention were particularly egregious.



In spite of growing wages, extremely low unemployment and nearly 3 percent economic growth in 2018, the liberal media are becoming obsessed with recession. It didn’t matter that CFOs were confident the U.S. economy “will not experience a recession” in 2019. They were fixated by recession prospects in March anyway.

Every. Single. Day.



It turns out the Green New Deal is even too extreme for even the solar and wind industry — especially its elements that extend far beyond energy and climate policy, according to Reuters.



Amber Athey at the Daily Caller reported "Reuters bragged Friday about its scoop that Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke was once involved in a notorious hacker group, but revealed in the process that one of its reporters willingly sat on the story until after O’Rourke lost his Texas Senate race to incumbent Ted Cruz."



One easily demonstrable way that secular media outlets underline their secularism is on issues like euthanasia, or as they like to call it, the "right to die." Reuters reporter Sabela Ojea issued a very one-sided dispatch from Spain with a hope-and-change headline: "As Spain readies euthanasia law, dying sclerosis victim senses hope." Nowhere in the Reuters dispatch is there an opposing view, just the note that the country's traditional Catholic influence has been on the wane for 40 years.