The City of Seattle probably didn't expect pushback from Costco, seen by many on the left as retail's "anti-Walmart," after its "sugary drink" tax of 1.75 cents per ounce went into effect January 1. But that is exactly what has happened. In moves the national press, which largely supports such taxes, has thus far ignored, Costco is itemizing the built-in cost of the tax on its Seattle store's shelf tags, and informing customers that they won't pay the tax if they shop at one of two other Costco stores outside Seattle's city limits.



On Saturday, Frank Miele, the managing editor of the Daily Inter Lake in Kalispell, Montana, recounted what he called an "unexpected chance to put my finger in the dike holding back the flood of fake news caused by those afflicted with Trump Derangement Syndrome." Miele acted on an "unfounded" story about one of President Donald Trump's tweets by the Associated Press's Darlene Superville, who "either misunderstood Trump’s tweet" about FBI Assistant Director Andrew McCabe or "intentionally lied about it."



The Left is incessantly freaking about all sorts of things - about which very little freaking is actually necessary. The Media is - by-and-large - the Left’s megaphone. About whatever the Left is freaking - you’ll find the Media freaking. Only louder, with many, MANY more outlets with which to amplify the freaking. The advent of the Internet - has exponentially increased the number of outlets through which the Media can freak. 



Many of Kentucky Senator Rand Paul's neighbors are hotly disputing Louisville Courier Journal and New York Times reports which characterized the Friday assault on the Republican Senator as being the result of "petty arguments over misplaced lawn trimmings and branches" and "a landscaping dispute," respectively. Among their objections: The  Courier Journal's Thomas Novelly described the attack, during which Rene Boucher allegedly blindsided Paul and, per the Senator's most recent tweet, left him with six broken ribs and a "pleural effusion" as a "fight," while the opening sentence at the Times story authored by three reporters described it as an "altercation."



A Louisville Courier Journal item currently carried at USA Today by reporter Thomas Novelly seems to imply that Rand Paul deserved to be blindsided, tackled and to have possibly life-threatening serious injuries inflicted on him Friday afternoon. After all, the headline reads: "Rand Paul is not a perfect neighbor" — according to the developer of the gated community in which Paul and Rene Boucher, the alleged perpetrator, both live.



On Tuesday, a man admitted that, as written up at Cleveland.com, the website of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, he killed his 27-year-old daughter in September 2016 "because he felt she disrespected his rules about coming home late and failing to clean up her room." One of those rules was clearly: Don't date non-Muslim men. Though he avoided using the actual term, PD reporter Adam Ferrise at least gave readers enough information to show that what took place was a de facto Muslim "honor killing" — something a related Associated Press report was determined not to enable readers to discern.



The proactive, preemptive violence of so-called anti-fascists, aka "antifas," has gotten very light media exposure. It's fair to say that one big reason for this is the establishment press's reluctance to recognize or even report their violent and intricately planned attacks. A months-long undercover investigation by Steven Crowder and his producer found ample evidence of antifas' premeditated determination to commit violence against those who merely express views they don't like. He also showed that local and national journalists deliberately walked away from the evidence he presented and have refused to recognize his work, even when corroborated in the presence of law enforcement authorities.



In its roughly 30th installment of "Red Century," a weekly series of op-eds dedicated to the notion that 20th century communism wasn't all that bad, the New York Times performed a bit of perhaps inadvertent recycling. On Monday, Helen Gao, in an item the Times appears to have had the good sense to keep out of its print edition, argued, with "crucial caveats" (but not enough of them) that "the Communist revolution taught Chinese women to dream big." Times columnist Nicholas Kristof infamously said much the same thing in 2005.



Tuesday afternoon, Clay Waters at NewsBusters noted how two September 18 items in the New York Times ridiculed Texas and Florida, two recently hurricane-ravaged states whose governors and legislatures are pro-growth and Republican. Josh Boak, an economics writer at the Associated Press, was actually a day ahead of them on Florida, filing a Sunday item which claimed that "Irma's destructive floodwaters renewed fears about how to manage the state's population boom as the risks of climate change intensify."



On Tuesday, before Ben Shapiro's appearance at the University of California at Berkeley, Bari Weiss, a staff editor and writer in the opinion section at the New York Times, penned an op-ed accurately describing Shapiro's beliefs, defending his right to speak, and criticizing the "sloppy conflation" by leftist politicians and all too many in the press in trying to label all conservatives as "alt-right." Howls of leftist outrage ensued at the Times and on Twitter. Two days later, a longtime reporter in the Bay Area proved Weiss's point.

 



As of late Sunday afternoon, the Associated Press's coverage of potential contamination resulting from Hurricane Irma in Florida, certainly a legitimate issue, was remarkably measured. That dispatch's tone starkly contrasted with how the AP, without genuine basis, went after the U.S. EPA after Hurricane Harvey in Texas, and how childishly it reacted when the EPA pushed back hard against the wire service and reporter Michael Biesecker, who had not only filed a fake news story about Trump administration EPA head Scott Pruitt in late June, but who also appears to have a personal vendetta against Pruitt.



Thanks to Hurricane Harvey, the fact that the Fredrick Scott alleged multiple-murder story is not a major national news item yet is to a degree understandable. But there are already signs the the establishment press doesn't want to give this ugly saga the attention it deserves. Despite the fact that Scott is alleged to have made a threat to "kill all white people" in 2014 and that the known Kansas City trail murder victims (two on which murder charges have been filed, and three of which police believe may also be tied to Scott) were all white, the headline at People.com's coverage of the story is: "Suspect in 5 Kansas City Killings Allegedly Shot Men at Random While Walking Their Dogs." Yeah, "at random."