Thursday was a terrible day for the Democratic Party as they were rocked by two major scandals. First, Missouri State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal wrote on Facebook that she wanted President Trump assassinated. Second, Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s former IT staffer, Imran Awan was indicted on bank fraud among other charges. Again, it was a damaging day for the Dems but you wouldn’t know it from watching the Big Three Networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) who ignored all of it.


A Kansas woman who entered a national makeup artists contest has been disqualified from personally redeeming her prize after having been declared its winner. Why? Because, and only because, she posted on Instagram, without comment, a "Trump for President" 2016 graphic on Election Day last year. Despite having all the necessary evidence documenting what happened, the Wichita Eagle's related story headline only conceded that this is something Gypsy Freeman only "says."


The National Governor’s Association (NGA) conference is set to take place this weekend in Providence, Rhode Island featuring a speech from Canadien Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. The leftist state is clearly excited, seeing as how The Providence Journal spent the first 80 words of its lead story for Friday’s print edition touting Trudeau’s rear end.


The Associated Press has both given short shrift to and significantly whitewashed a frightening, violent threat made against President Donald Trump by a Democratic state representative from South Portland, Maine. On Tuesday, Scott Hamann, in a long Facebook rant, wrote, among other things, that "Trump is a half term president, at most, especially if I ever get within 10 feet of that p***y.”


On Friday, a lawyer for the New York Times, arguing before a Manhattan federal judge, claimed that the paper made "an honest mistake in posting the editorial" claiming that Sarah Palin directly incited the shooting of Arizona Congresswoman Gabby Giffords in 2011.


In remarks so bizarre and out of touch that satirists at outlets like The Onion would have rejected them if someone had suggested their inclusion in a made-up story, London's police chief has described the diversity of the city's London Bridge terror attack victims and witnesses interviewed as positive things. Gregory Katz at the Associated Press did his part to play along with the charade by failing to identify the lack of diversity among those who carried out the attack.


MSNBC's Richard Lui appears to be testing the limits of irresponsible media coverage of terrorist incidents. Up until now, the press has fretted in the aftermath of such attacks about possible retaliations or "backlash" against Muslims or others not involved in them, even though such misguided revenge-seeking has rarely occurred. Saturday evening, Lui worried about police "overreacting" shortly after terror attacks in London which, as of the time of this post, had taken the lives of seven innocents and injured 48 others, including 21 critically.


Longtime media bias observers know that if a Democrat wins a single special election race for national office during a Republican presidential administration, the press will say it's evidence that the nation's voters have changed their minds about which party should occupy the White House. If the Democrat loses ... well, in the pre-Internet era, the national press would pretend that the race never happened. These days, they instead have to come up with excuses, which are usually pathetic. The Associated Press engaged in such an exercise Friday morning after Republican Greg Gianforte defeated Democrat Rob Quist for Montana's single US House seat.


On Tuesday, Randy Hall at NewsBusters covered how "the Associated Press hired a 'freelancer' -- who turned out to be 'a hardcore left-wing activist' -- to attend a 'closed press' fund-raiser for the GOP in New Hampshire." In other words, the wire service sent Melanie Plenda to the event for the express purpose of crashing it, despite the NHGOP's clear instructions. It turns out that the Washington Post's Erik Wemple, in covering the fallout from Plenda's sneaky, sloppy work, is perfectly fine with that.


On May 12, California Governor Jerry Brown, during a visit to that state's Orange County, said, "The freeloaders — I’ve had enough of them." His statement came during what the Orange County Register called "an impassioned defense" of the state's recently passed "road-improvement plan. The "freeloaders" he targeted with his remark are the state's taxpayers, those who wish to recall a tax-supporting legislator, and Republicans involved in putting the tax on November ballot. The rest of California's press, as well as key national press outlets, have not taken note of Brown's remark.


Desperate to make a case that voter-ID laws kept "many" people who should be allowed to vote from casting ballots in Wisconsin in November, two reporters at the Associated Press claimed "it is not hard to find" examples of Badger State residents who were "turned away." Left unexplained is how reporters Christina A. Cassidy and Ivan Moreno apparently could only identify four people out of hundreds of thousands allegedly affected after six months of searching. Despite a headline claiming that those involved faced "insurmountable" barriers, each person cited could have successfully cast a ballot, but failed to do so because of inadequate follow-through.


Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced on Tuesday that he will not run for reelection as the city's mayor because of mounting allegations that he sexually abused underage boys in the 1980s. Press coverage has either ignored Murray's Democratic Party affiliation or buried it in related stories' late paragraphs.

This outcome also exposes a double standard in the Evergreen State press, and should (but probably won't) lead management at these outlets, particularly at the Seattle Times, to question why they chose not to report multiple allegations against Murray which first surfaced almost a decade ago.