Once again, protests against the NRA at its annual convention, this time in Dallas, have been pathetic. Turnout has been "shockingly small." One event had "maybe 100 (people), half of whom were journalists." An actress involved in the protest movement attended — accompanied by allegedly armed security guards, who illegally "chase(d) Texans out of a public park simply because they asked if she uses armed defense." Topping it all: The press has ignored the long, violent criminal record of local anti-NRA organizer Dominique Alexander.



Despite relatively recent Associated Press Stylebook changes mandating that elected officials' political party "should be routinely included" in stories about them, the wire service appears to be backsliding. On Saturday, I noted the wire service's failure – before being shamed into a partial remedy — to tag DC politicians engaged in public anti-Semitic outbursts and conspiracy theories as Democrats. Now it turns out that the AP's Scott Bauer, in a Saturday dispatch, failed to apply the Democratic Party tag to Lena Taylor, a Wisconsin State Senator charged with disorderly conduct in a racially-charged incident at a Milwaukee bank. Is the AP Stylebook genuine guidance, or a $22-per-copy exercise in pretense?



The Arizona Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday that illegal immigrants protected from deportation under former President Barack Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program are not eligible for in-state tuition rates at state universities and community colleges. Press coverage is glossing over the fact that the state's educational establishment unilaterally took obviously illegal actions to institute this practice, directly defying a 2006 measure approved by 71 percent of the state's voters.



To accompany his Facebook post unleashing a torrent of disdain for the Sinclair Broadcast Group (SBG), disgraced former CBS Evening News anchor Dan Rather used his weekly show on the far-left network The Young Turks to expand on the Sinclair ad controversy, denouncing it as “Orwellian” “propaganda” while deeming press criticism as authoritarian behavior.



Normally, HLN’s S.E. Cupp Unfiltered can be counted on to push back against the liberal media when they get stirred up into one of their nonsensical frenzies with the most recent case being the gun control debate. But on Tuesday, Cupp parroted the CNN company line by condemning Sinclair Broadcast Group as nothing more than state-owned propaganda. She even took it a step farther and compared them to Heaven’s Gate suicide cult.



In Asheville, North Carolina, the Gannett-affiliated Citizen Times gave wall-to-wall coverage to the city's version of Saturday's March For Our Lives. Somehow, though, the paper didn't find the time or energy for almost three weeks to report a March 7 comment by a Democratic candidate for county sheriff who told a Michael Bloomberg-funded "Moms Demand Action" group that prying guns out of owners' "cold dead hands" would be "okay." Finally, the paper noted the controversy on Tuesday — and came down on R. Daryl Fisher's side.



Shortly after the Parkland, Florida high school massacre, the Associated Press and New York Daily News treated the fact that the NRA had given $10,000 in non-cash assistance to the school's Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps, of which Nikolas Cruz had been a member, as some kind of scandal. Now, buried deep in a Friday Florida Sun Sentinel story, we learn that JROTC's leaders "banned Cruz from firing guns with the group during shooting practice" way back in September, 2016. That's more than a legion of others did to stop Cruz or get him help during the next 17 months.



On March 10, "authorities say," a 22 year-old man in South Carolina killed "his grandparents, an aunt and a cousin." It appears that only the Associated Press has given attention to this story. By contrast, recent "mass killings" involving fewer victims received widespread national coverage. Why is that? The answer appears to be that the South Carolina attacker didn't use a gun.



Democrat Conor Lamb was declared the narrow special congressional election winner Tuesday in PA-18, where voters are predominantly pro-life. Lamb, with media help, came across as "pro-life." He's not — and his successful deception may portend an effort by abortion proponents and their lockstep establishment press supporters to spread disinformation about Democratic candidates' true abortion positions nationwide.



Friday, California's High-Speed Rail Authority published its draft 2018 Business Plan. Its 800-mile bullet-train project's estimated cost is now $77.3 billion, up from $64 billion two years ago, and its final completion has been pushed out another four years to 2033. The current estimate is now more than 70 percent above the $45 billion presented to voters in 2008. The related Associated Press story failed to disclose that original cost estimate, as did three leading California newspapers.



On Sunday, CBS's San Francisco affiliate appears to have originally thought it had a sympathetic story about an illegal immigrant "taken away" in front of his wife and daughter. But two-thirds of the way into its report, KPIX finally told viewers and readers that the man "does have a dangerous past" — but never mentioned four previous deportations.



Sunday, Australia's The Today Show host asked Fire and Fury author Michael Wolff whether he should apologize for starting and backing away from a rumor of an extramarital affair between UN Ambassador Haley and President Trump. Wolff then claimed that his earpiece wasn't working. At one point, when the host asked Wolff if he could hear him, the author responded almost immediately. Today subsequently demonstrated that there were no technical difficulties.