Thursday was a terrible day for the Democratic Party as they were rocked by two major scandals. First, Missouri State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal wrote on Facebook that she wanted President Trump assassinated. Second, Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s former IT staffer, Imran Awan was indicted on bank fraud among other charges. Again, it was a damaging day for the Dems but you wouldn’t know it from watching the Big Three Networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) who ignored all of it.


Monday evening, National Public Radio published a tweet about the Google-free speech controversy that raised eyebrows and brought on torrents of ridicule, namely that "some women at the company skipped work today, upset by the leaked memo" written by now-fired software engineer James Damore. It turns out that the basis for the claim is so extraordinarily thin that it shouldn't have been reported.


On Wednesday, NPR’s Illinois affiliate WGLT promoted a claim without pushback by a McLean County, IL superintendent named Mark Daniel that, if the state passed a school vouchers program, the Land of Lincoln would plunge back half a century into “segregation.” Illinois is in a heated battle led by Republican Governor Bruce Rauner to enact a voucher program to allow students to succeed, individuals like Daniel and the public sector unions have resorted to such scare tactics.


NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday followed the lead of the New York Times and boosted a recent article published by an ally of Pope Francis that targeted "ultra-conservative" Catholics for forming a so-called "alliance of hate with evangelicals." Host Lulu Garcia Navarro turned to Joshua McElwee of the National Catholic Reporter for his analysis of the article, but failed to mention his publication's heterodox/left-wing stances on many Church issues. McElwee contended that these "right-wing" Catholics are "operating in the exact opposite way of the Pope — which, for a Catholic, is obviously a very strange thing."


NPR aired a completely one-sided segment on Wednesday's Morning Edition that targeted the Attorney General Jeff Sessions's leadership of the Justice Department. Carrie Johnson played up that a possible Justice Department initiative targeting colleges' affirmative action policies on admissions was " just part of a broader rollback of Obama-era priorities in civil rights, from protecting LGBT people to drug policy to policing." The program exclusively turned to a former Obama-era official at DOJ, who bashed the attorney general for supposedly having a "decidedly anti-civil rights agenda."


It was thirty years ago this week that the FCC, wanting to “extend to the electronic press the same First Amendment guarantees that the print media have enjoyed since our country’s inception,” abandoned the Fairness Doctrine. Some liberals hoped that the Obama administration would retrieve it, but that didn’t happen. That was too bad, indicated The Washington Monthly’s D.R. Tucker in a Monday post. Getting rid of the doctrine, Tucker claimed, was a “destructive” move and “a shamefully successful effort to divide our public airwaves along partisan lines, a choice that made a few people rich while impoverishing our democracy.”


On Wednesday, NPR's All Things Considered sided with opponents of President Donald Trump's proposal to bar transgender people from serving in the military. Host Kelly McEvers interviewed veteran Jordan Blisk, who served in the Air Force Reserve before then-President Barack Obama's administration lifted the previous ban in June 2016, and came out as transgender after leaving the military. However, McEvers failed to mention that Blisk is now a LGBT activist in Colorado. The public radio program also didn't bring on any supporters of the new policy.


NPR's Morning Edition on Monday zeroed in on a pro-life group's ongoing protest outside Kentucky's last abortion clinic. Correspondent Lisa Gillespie featured three pro-abortion activists during her report versus just one pro-lifer. Gillespie also let one of the abortion backers smear pro-lifers as potential terrorists. Vicki Saporta of the National Abortion Federation contended that prosecuting those who use the controversial tactic of blocking abortion clinic entrances prevents "the kinds of arsons, bombings, and murders that we've too often seen."


The Wednesday edition of NPR's All Things Considered spotlighted 15 teenaged Latina activists who protested a new law in Texas that allows law enforcement in the state to investigate the immigration status of individuals in police custody. The young women dressed in formal dresses during their demonstration outside the state capitol in Austin, and performed a choreographed dance. Correspondent Vanessa Romo identified the group that organized the protest, but failed to mention their liberal ideology.


Conservative talk radio icon Rush Limbaugh spent the bulk of his eponymous Tuesday program responding to the troubling e-mail trail of the Donald Trump Jr.-Russian lawyer meeting by slamming the hyperventilating news media while giving a hat-tip to “our buddy Brent Bozell and his gang at NewsBusters.” 


National Public Radio is living up to its brand as a taxpayer-funded sandbox for leftists with a new online feature on the NPREd blog headlined “Summer Reading For Your Woke Kid.”

Kayla Lattimore began by celebrating children’s author Innosanto Nagara, who wanted a "woke" two-year-old and NPR can hook you up with "social change" radicals: 


Wednesday's All Things Considered on NPR touted how a conservative portion of California supposedly needs ObamaCare to stay, despite the personal opposition of the people there. Robert Siegel played up that "a lot of people there have benefited from a law Republicans are trying to roll back — the Affordable Care Act, or ObamaCare." April Dembosky of local affiliate KQED spotlighted how "clinics in the northeast corner of the state are lobbying local officials to take an unpopular position in this conservative land: defend ObamaCare."