During his ongoing tour to promote his book -- A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership -- former FBI Director James Comey responded to a question on Wednesday from a reporter that he said he had never before been asked: Is the “smashing of cell phones and destruction of thousands of emails” by the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign in 2016 “obstruction of justice?” The query came from Joan Jones of the WTOP-FM radio station in Washington, D.C., and Comey replied: “Now that’s a great question. That’s the first time I’ve been asked that.”



Yet again today, Rush Limbaugh demonstrated why he has remained the dominant figure on the radio airwaves for more than three decades -- few other observers dissect liberals and their endless pathologies with such precision and consistency. Why is it, Limbaugh was asked during a recent outing with friends, that liberals appear intent on savaging Senator Marco Rubio, who emerged after the Parkland school massacre as the most high-profile Republican willing to compromise with Democrats on firearms.



NPR's All Things Considered on Thursday promoted an activist's own spin about her abortion campaign in Ireland, which likened the cause to the 19th-century effort that helped slaves escape bondage in the Southern United States. Lauren Frayer spotlighted how "there's a sort of modern-day underground railroad discreetly shuttling thousands of Irish women to abortion clinics" outside of the Emerald Isle. This is the same phrase that Mara Clarke of the Abortion Support Network used during a soundbite later in Frayer's report: "You could call it an underground railroad. I prefer to think of it as sisters doing it for themselves."



Sunday night's 2018 iHeartRadio Awards went into the same old song and dance showing its love for liberal politics, especially gun control.



NPR couldn't be bothered to include pro-gun rights talking heads in their Monday coverage of boycotts targeting the National Rifle Association and gun manufacturers. Morning Edition featured pro-gun control activist Shannon Watts during their report on the "more than a dozen companies...cutting ties with the National Rifle Association." However, the program merely read an excerpt from a NRA statement responding to the corporate moves. Hours later, All Things Considered turned to two gun control supporters — California state treasurer John Chiang and Avery Gardiner of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence — during a segment on the anti-gun manufacturers campaign. The evening newscast followed its sister program's lead in leaving out gun rights suppporters from the report.



Raoul Peck, the director of the new film, The Young Karl Marx, acclaimed the 19th-century radical leftist on Sunday's All Things Considered on NPR: "Today, his [Marx's] analyses are even more urgent and necessary than before." Anchor Sarah McCammon pointed out, "But hasn't this been tried before many times? I mean, Marx's ideas pervaded, for instance, the Soviet Union." Peck denied this historic reality: "It did not influence the Soviet Union. Marx and Engels would have probably been the first one to be shot....this incredible monster that was fabricated after the Russian Revolution has nothing to do with their ideas."



Left wing radio host Thom Hartmann, as those familiar with his rants are aware, has long railed against Republicans as hellbent on dismantling not just the welfare state provisions of Lyndon Johnson's so-called Great Society, most specifically Medicare, but also the core provisions of Roosevelt's New Deal, with Social Security topping the list.



Conservative talk radio legend Rush Limbaugh came locked and loaded for Wednesday’s show, torching the liberal media as “childish,” “unstable,” and “entirely unfit to discharge their constitutional duties” in light of their “unhinged instability” at Tuesday’s White House press briefing concerning President Trump’s health.



NPR's All Things Considered on Thursday zeroed in on a pro-life organization that tries to get the employees of abortion facilities to end their participation in the killing of unborn babies. Despite the surprising attention on former Planned Parenthood manager Abby Johnson and her group, And Then There Were None, the public radio program still inserted slanted language into their report. Sarah McCammon labeled the organization an "anti-abortion group." McCammon later noted that Johnson has "gradually been embraced by the anti-abortion rights movement."



In an interview with BBC Radio on Saturday, Michael Wolff, the author of the dubiously-sourced gossip book targeting President Trump, boasted to host Nick Robinson that “the story” that he told, “will finally end...this presidency” once and for all. Wolff’s self-glorification was brought on when Robinson questioned the effectiveness of the book alone and wondered if it would help the Russia investigation in any way since that had a greater chance of getting rid of Trump.



Yeah, good luck with that. The perpetual outrage machine that is the left's pathological loathing for President Trump keeps reaching new lows in absurdity, albeit only on an hourly basis. Plenty of liberals have labeled Trump's tweet slamming Democrat Senator and potential 2020 opponent Kirsten Gillibrand as "sexual harassment." But liberal radio host Thom Hartmann went beyond that and described it -- I'm not making this up -- as grounds for impeachment.



The sexual-harassment allegations inside public radio continue to reverberate. On Wednesday, Minnesota Public Radio announced they would “cut all business ties” with snobbish liberal public-radio legend Garrison Keillor – a year after he retired from his show A Prairie Home Companion – as they investigate a report of "inappropriate behavior" by Keillor involving someone who worked with him on his show.