While Al Sharpton is known for giving powerful speeches, the liberal civil rights activist also has had more than his share of blunders using certain words or phrases. The latest example of this came on Sunday morning, when the host of the PoliticsNation program on the liberal MSNBC cable channel got his tongue twisted by mispronouncing “homicide” as “homo-cide.”



While Al Sharpton is certainly no stranger to controversy, his latest ploy has raised eyebrows across the political spectrum. Before the liberal activist steps down as president of the National Action Network next year, he has apparently found a new way to make money off the charity he founded in 1991: selling his “life story rights for a 10-year period” for more than half a million dollars.



Anyone who wonders why MSNBC consigns Al Sharpton to its weekend schedule need only watch PoliticsNation for not long at all and the reason becomes apparent -- Sharpton's unerring penchant for stepping it it, eyes wide open. There he was again Saturday, telling viewers about President Trump's official remarks regarding Thanksgiving and Trump's response to a reporter's question about the holiday. Sharpton being Sharpton, the results were predictably goofy. 



On Friday night and on Saturday, several MSNBC shows threw around charges of racism by Georgia Republicans as the liberal news network continued hyping the story of 53,000 new voter registrations being held in a "pending" status until those voters verify their information.



On Sunday's PoliticsNation, as MSNBC host Al Sharpton devoted his show's "Gotcha" segment to excoriating President Donald Trump for calling former White House advisor Omarosa Manigault Newman a "dog," he also admitted that, in spite of suggestions of being racially motivated, Trump has a history of calling many people, including white men, "dog."



On Sunday's PoliticsNation, during a discussion of recent high-profile cases of blacks who have been killed by whites, MSNBC contributor Jason Johnson declared that such behavior has been "empowered" by a "white nationalist, white supremacist presidency," adding that "It is a daily danger to live life as a black person in this country."



On Sunday morning's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, during the "Gotcha" segment, host Al Sharpton lamely compared himself to James Bond as he likened conservative donors Charles and David Koch to Bond-type "villains" because of their support for conservative causes.

 



What a shock it truly wasn't that one of the most warped recent examples of Trump Derangement Syndrome would be heard on a cable show hosted by Al Sharpton. Former Chicago Bulls player Craig Hodges, author of "Long Shot: The Struggles and Triumphs of an NBA Freedom Fighter," appeared on Sharpton's PoliticsNation yesterday to talk about President Trump's criticism of NFL athletes for kneeling during the national anthem to protest perceived racial injustices.



On Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, as Al Sharpton presided over a discussion of an upcoming march to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr.'s role in the Civil Rights Movement, the MSNBC host fretted that President Donald Trump is "killing the dream" after one of the guests claimed that MLK Jr.'s "dream" had become a "nightmare" for many.

 



On Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, host Al Sharpton slammed President Donald Trump for recently using the term "paddy wagon," calling it an "anti-Irish ethnic slur." He then went on to absolve himself of his own long history of using ethnic slurs by vaguely admitting to doing so in the past, but by lumping himself in with everyone else as "we," as he claimed he already "corrected" his offensive comments.



On Sunday's PoliticsNation, after MSNBC legal analyst Paul Butler incorrectly claimed that a "majority" of those killed by police officers are "people of color," host Al Sharpton later reiterated that it "usually" happens to "people of color." In fact, according to statistics compiled on police killings for 2015 and 2016, for those cases in which the victim's race has been identified, more than half those killed were white.



On Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, during the show's regular "Gotcha" segment, host Al Sharpton was imagining racist dog whistles as he complained about "unmitigated, racially-tinged cruelty" from Congressman Steve King, and suggested that those who think like the Iowa Republican are "evil."