Try to imagine the most guarded, self-protective personalities you know. Chances are good that among that list of people the name of Hillary Clinton pops up. And yet, Politico hilariously wants you to believe that Hillary Clinton is now looking for inspiration on how to conduct her upcoming podcast show to that most open of personalities... Howard Stern.



What will be the deciding factor in Senate impeachment trial? How badly do the senators wish to go home, theorized Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX). In an episode of the “Verdict with Ted Cruz” podcast titled “A Day in the Life” on Jan. 30, the Senator described to co-host Michael Knowles how the conditions of living and working in the Senate may force a final judgment over the weekend.



This could qualify as one of those rare occasions you'll hear a member of the Trump-hating media saying something about Trump voters that just might be interpreted as praise. The person saying it? Pamela Paul, editor of the New York Times Book Review and host of its podcast. The occasion? Her interview on May 24 with historian Rick Atkinson, author of the newly released The British are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777, the first volume of a planned trilogy. 



Did you hear about the new study out of Berlin which found that 92 percent of left-wing activists still live with their parents? This will come as no surprise to nearly every conservative learning about it. What the study didn't look at though was what percent of left-wing activists never leave adolescence. Chances are, that answer would have been on the high end. Latest example from liberal media -- Bill Press yesterday on his radio show/podcast discussing the latest "milkshaking" incident in Great Britain, this one targeting Nigel Farage, a leader of the Brexit movement.



The website for the NPR Politics podcast describes it as "where NPR political reporters talk to you like they talk to each other" -- while assuming that conservatives aren't listening. This can lead to unintentionally comedic content, at least for those conservatives who are listening and presumably cringing through the rest of it. NPR Justice Department correspondent Carrie Johnson found "infamy" in William Barr releasing a four-page summary of the Mueller report. 



High atop the list of old habits in media that will never die: kneejerk apologia for the failed utopia known as the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Russian President and former KGB spook Vladimir Putin isn't alone in pining for its glories. During a weekly roundup of the NPR Politics podcast on Feb. 14, Domenico Montanaro, the state-funded radio network's "lead political editor," chided Republicans for having the audacity to use Democrats' swooning for socialism against them.



Pretty bad sign when she's lost National Public Radio. Wasting little time to clear the deck for her upcoming presidential campaign, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-People's Republic of Massachusetts, last week trumpeted the results of a DNA test she took in an effort to prove she is of Native American descent. Warren reveals test confirming ancestry read the assertive headline in the Boston Globe announcing the news -- and it was all downhill from there.



Remember back when a solid sense of skepticism was considered a prerequisite for working in journalism? Looks like that ethos is long gone and discarded. Speaking with former U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara about her hit piece on then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, New Yorker writer Jane Mayer came across as revealing a bit more than intended.



Hollywood doesn’t just have a problem objectifying women off-screen, according to Hollywood actresses involved with #MeToo. There’s a problem with what they're pressured to do on-screen, too. On Tuesday, actress Evangeline Lilly, who most recently starred in Ant-Man and the Wasp, revealed that in her former role on Lost, she cried and trembled after she was “basically cornered into doing a scene partially naked.” She made her comments about the show, which she acted on from 2004 to 2010, during The Lost Boys podcast. And she’s not alone: other big name actresses have pointed to trauma after similar situations.



Tom Steyer, the billionaire liberal donor spending millions to try to impeach President Donald Trump, blasted his Democratic critics in a Politico podcast on May 29.

Steyer said many things in the Off Message political podcast hosted by Isaac Dovere — including comparing Democratic pushback against his impeachment efforts to opposition to the civil rights movement, said Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and others are “normalizing” Trump’s presidency and attempted to downplay his own huge political spending.



You know you're listening to National Public Radio when the abnormal is casually passed off as normal. Such was the case in the most recent NPR Politics podcast that was posted by National Public Radio on April 5, with a weekly roundup of news that runs every Thursday. NPR's Scott Horsley said border crossings are "kind of bouncing back off of an artificially low floor and what we're really seeing is illegal border crossings returning to sort of the kind of normal level."



More than 30 years after a relentless campaign of character assassination kept Robert Bork from a seat on the Supreme Court, one of the architects of that attack is belatedly crediting its target for his brilliance.

Appearing on the popular liberal podcast Pod Save America on March 28, former Vice President Joe Biden revisited his role in derailing Bork's nomination to the court in 1987 while Biden was chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.