In a heated yet entertaining battle of the minds, the Fox News Channel’s Bill O’Reilly faced off on Wednesday night against Fusion/Univision anchor Jorge Ramos for a seven-minute-plus bout over the proposed Kate’s Law, illegal immigration, and Ramos’ decidedly liberal tilt toward advocacy that had O’Reilly telling Ramos that “you’re not a newsman anymore.”



For the second time in a week, Fox News Channel (FNC) host Bill O’Reilly turned to statistics from the “very accurate” Media Research Center to form the basis of a segment of The O’Reilly Factor concerning the major broadcast network coverage of the Planned Parenthood scandal with Thursday’s mention comparing it with the droves of coverage given to the shooting death of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe. 



On his Tuesday night show, with the help of Kelly Riddell of the Washington Times, Bill O'Reilly of Fox News described how the "Black Lives Matter" movement sustains itself. The rest of the press wants readers, listeners and viewers to presume that it is a self-sustaining, grass-roots movement. It isn't.

O'Reilly also noted that megastars Jay-Z and Beyoncé, numbers 28 and 29, respectively, on the Forbes list of top-paid celebrities, are supporting the movement, which describes itself as "grass-roots" but is really the ultimate in Astroturf. Also at the end of this post, following up on one I did on ESPN's Stephen A. Smith last week, I have posted Smith's original six-minute radio-show rant on how selective and tyrannical the movement is.



On Thursday’s edition of The O’Reilly Factor on the Fox News Channel, host Bill O’Reilly cited statistics complied by the Media Research Center to lambast the “big three” networks of ABC, CBS, and NBC for their minuscule coverage of the Planned Parenthood video scandal which O’Reilly and guest Bernie Goldberg found to be yet another sign that “[l]iberal philosophy dominates” the news media.



This item is only worthy of note because it's about an apparently genuine apology from a leftist — something rarely seen from the "I'm sorry you were offended" crowd — and because the chances are that very few have actually seen the apology.

Early last week, MSNBC's Chris Hayes claimed that Bill O'Reilly had asserted, as if it was the Fox News host's opinion, that the Confederate flag "represents the bravery of Confederates who fought in the Civil War." Of course, that isn't what O'Reilly said, and O'Reilly called Hayes out:



In his "Talking Points" opening monologue Wednesday night, Fox News's Bill O'Reilly lit into the establishment press for allowing the notion that America is a "white supremacist nation" to go "largely unchallenged." He further accused the press of allowing itself to be "intimidated," leaving Fox as the only channel, in his view, "standing up for the truth."

I have been told that O'Reilly's monologue went about twice as long it usually does, but that's because he had a lot to say, and said it well.



On Tuesday’s O’Reilly Factor, Bill O’Reilly used his opening “talking points memo” segment to call out a guest on CNN International and “America haters” who he believes “are succeeding to some extent” in “trying to tear down the racial fabric” of the country by “selling rank propaganda.” Prior to his heated debate with Fox News contributor Kristen Powers, O’Reilly rhetorically asked viewers if “the American compact is falling apart?”



Reacting to the media coverage thus far of the deadly church shooting in Charleston, South Carolina, Fox News contributor Bernard Goldberg joined Thursday’s O’Reilly Factor on the Fox News Channel and eviscerated the liberal media for having “a long, detestable history” of using instances of innocent lives being senselessly lost “as an opportunity to bash conservative media.”



O’Reilly Factor host Bill O’Reilly engaged in a heated battle with South Carolina Democratic Representative Todd Rutherford on Thursday evening over Ruthford’s dubious claims that he made hours earlier about how the alleged gunman in the deadly Charleston church shooting had sought guidance from “things like Fox News” as it supposedly offers “hate speech.” The roughly three-minute exchange revolved mainly around Rutherford’s belief that alleged shooter Dylann Roof was a viewer of the Fox News Channel (FNC) where it “continues to cover stories as to whether the President is truly the President” and inferred that it enabled him to claim during the massacre that “black people are raping white women.”



Picking up on comedian Jerry Seinfeld’s concern “there’s a creepy PC thing out there” on college campuses in which comedians are condemned for jokes which convey stereotypes, Bernard Goldberg called out Seinfeld for failing to recognize liberals are behind the “authoritarian” speech code.



GOP presidential candidate and U.S. senator Ted Cruz took part in a town hall meeting sponsored by talk radio station WRKO in Boston and didn't hold anything back when responding to questions from host Jeff Kuhner.

The Texas Republican joked that if he wins the White House, “the first thing I should do is send flowers and a note of condolences to all of the reporters and editors who have checked themselves into therapy.”



Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly took aim at President Obama during his “Talking Points Memo” on Monday’s O’Reilly Factor and ruled that the United States has “a leader who doesn’t want to lead” in addition to “lack[ing] the will to defeat” ISIS. The Fox News Channel host first set the scene by playing a clip of Obama telling reporters on Monday at the G-7 Summit that the U.S. still does not “have a complete strategy” for defeating ISIS and how that was strikingly similar to his assessment of the U.S. fight against ISIS in August 2014.