Gateway Pundit dubbed the Democratic National Convention's program Tuesday evening as "Criminal Appreciation Night." Site proprietor Jim Hoft certainly has a point. The party officially nominated a candidate for the highest office in the land who committed acknowledged and admitted criminal acts, but whom the FBI and the intensely politicized Justice Department chose not to prosecute. A former president who was impeached over admitted perjury, also known as a crime, was also a featured speaker.

Tuesday night's program also included an appearance by several representatives of "Mothers of the Movement." Here, as seen at the Dayton Daily News, is how Richard Thompson of Rare.us, a Cox Media-owned web operation, began his coverage of the "Mothers" appearance:



It's a good thing all those layers of fact-checkers and proofreaders are out there in the establishment press making sure that they don't misinform their readers about the dates and times of impending events.

Oh, wait a minute. Both Cleveland.com, the home website of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, and the Associated Press promoted a "Stand Together Against Trump" rally as if it would take place Tuesday afternoon. The problem is that the protest isn't until Thursday. Oops. I guess they were just overanxious.



UPDATE, July 17: The Enquirer corrected the error by removing the related sentence and placing the following "correction" below the article's boilerplate describing the paper's three-part series — "Correction: An earlier version incorrectly stated that 220,000 were murdered last year. The total was since Sept. 11, 2001."

A Cincinnati Enquirer reporter and her editors thoroughly embarrassed themselves and their employer on Friday. Additionally, given that the error involved has been present for over 36 hours, they may not realize it unless and until someone tells them about this post.

The reporter, Jessie Balmert, told readers that the number of murders in the U.S. last year was 15 times higher than it actually was. The Enquirer's editors, assuming they exist (one almost hopes that they don't), were also too ignorant to catch the blatantly obvious but agenda-fitting error.



ESPN, not content to cover sports, wants in on the burgeoning social-justice market as well. In “Waiting for LeBron," an ESPN magazine essay, Washington Post reporter Eli Saslow pondered why Cleveland Cavaliers basketball legend LeBron James backed off his brief anti-gun activism. Saslow’s histrionic analysis of James “the athlete and the activist” makes it clear that LeBron has (somehow) let both a grieving father and his home city down, by only going halfway in fighting racism and police shootings and gun violence in general, while noting in a single sentence that James, who lives in a gated mansion surrounded by bodyguards, likes to fire guns himself.



I didn't realize this, but then again I played youth sports back in the Mesozoic Era. When an exasperated coach called us "sissies" for not trying hard enough, whining about routine bumps and bruises, or (in baseball) not sliding, they were, according to today's ignorant PC police, hitting us with an anti-homosexual slur. Horse manure; no they weren't. They simply didn't want us to act "timid or cowardly" (Definition 2 at Dictionary.com), two traits which are not positives in competitive situations.

In researching this post, I learned that the PC police succeeded in excising the idea of calling any single person or specifically named group of persons a "sissy" or "sissies" from civil conversation five to seven years ago. What I didn't realize is that they object even if the word is not directed at specific people. That explains why Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame baseball announcer Marty Brennaman became a recipient of their ire on Wednesday.



Despite the decay of the left-dominated blue-city model during the past several decades, liberals and the press are not fans of many urban neighborhood improvement efforts.

One recent example found at a national media outlet is at Newsweek, where on April 2, Alexander Nazaryan, in an item headlined "WHITE CITY: THE NEW URBAN BLIGHT IS RICH PEOPLE," wrote that "gentrification ... turns cities into playgrounds for moneyed, childless whites while pushing out the poor, the working-class, immigrants, seniors and anyone else not plugged into 'the knowledge economy.'" In Cincinnati, the same tone was unfortunately present in the Cincinnati Enquirer's Sunday coverage of the situation in the city's Over-the-Rhine neighborhood 15 years after that area's race riots made national news.



Watch it happen like clockwork twice this year. Adjusting the clock for daylight savings? No. MSNBC's fear-mongering about voter ID laws, happening now in front of the North Carolina, Florida, and Ohio primaries and surely to repeat later this fall in front of the general election in those states.



Layers of editors and fact-checkers at the Columbus (OH) Dispatch and others involved in its production "somehow" failed to detect the creation of an obviously false caption to a campaign rally photo of Donald Trump taken by a St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer.

The photo, taken on Friday at Trump's St. Louis appearance by the Post-Dispatch's David Carson, had the following caption, apparently added surreptitiously, when it appeared in print at the Columbus Dispatch: "Donald Trump addresses a campaign rally in St. Louis. He was scheduled to go to Chicago for a rally, but canceled as his supporters became violent."



Columbia Journalism professor Dale Maharidge has produced a lengthy lament about the state of print and newsroom journalism, and how hard it's been on those forced out of their jobs. It's present online at The Nation, one of the far-left's flagships, and at BillMoyers.com, the web site of the former Johnson administration press secretary. The delusional Moyers believes that "We have an ideological press that's interested in the election of Republicans."

The title of Maharidge's mournful missive at Moyers' site asks a question: "What Happens to Journalists When No One Wants to Print Their Words Anymore?" The answer, Mr. Maharidge, is that when all of you had the chance, you failed to be reporters, and did so in the name of agenda-driven "journalism." You failed to give the public the basic information it had every right to expect, and in the process frequently demonstrated contempt for your audience. As a result, the public has largely tuned newspapers out, and they're not coming back.



The Associated Press has posted four stories during the past week on the machete-wielding Islamist who attacked patrons at the Nazareth Restaurant and Deli in Columbus, Ohio on February 11, seriously wounding several.

The wire service's coverage has been a textbook example of deliberate reality avoidance.



The callousness towards human life at Planned Parenthood is such that it believes that the remains of preborn babies killed during abortions are just like any other "medical waste," and that sending them to landfills — or, perhaps even incinerators — is therefore "humane."

That's what one must conclude from reading an Associated Press report Friday evening which strived mightily to play defense for the beleaguered group. The wire service's headline only described State Attorney General Mike DeWine as an "official." The opening sentence from Andrew Welsh-Huggins only conceded that DeWine "criticized" the practices at Ohio's Planned Parenthood's locations, when his press release clearly contends that it has been violating state regulations (bolds are mine):



After the November 2014 midterm elections, I wrote that "Despite all of their supposed science, improved methodologies, and sophisticated turnout models, nation’s pollsters have just suffered through their worst midterm elections drubbing in 20 years. The last time they were off this badly was when they woefully underestimated Republican gains in the Newt Gingrich 'Contract with America' midterms of 1994." I also predicted that "If they’re right from now on, it will it only be by accident."

Very few, if any, such "accidents" occurred this year. In key contests, double-digit and worse variances from polled predictions were the norm.