The back page of the New York Times magazine typically features a liberal journalist (often Audie Cornish of NPR) interviewing a liberal hero. This Sunday it was April Ryan, the Washington bureau chief for American Urban Radio Networks and analyst for CNN, notorious for her anti-Trump attacks in the White House press room, and her denial of certain realities, in “April Ryan Asks Political Questions No One Else Will.” No matter how ridiculous, ideologically charged, or conspiratorial they may be.


On Tuesday's Fresh Air on NPR, host Terry Gross and her guest, liberal author Joshua Green, discussed how Trump and Trump-affiliated Republicans somehow created an "epidemic" of sexual assault. Green wrote a book on Trump adviser Steve Bannon unsubtly titled Devil's Bargain. Gross briefly mentioned NPR has its own sexual harassment problem ("epidemic"?). 


If National Public Radio political editor Domenico Montanaro is wondering why he's getting the cold shoulder at work these days, this might explain it.

Montanaro was one of four journalists to appear on the NPR Politics podcast for a weekly roundup segment on Feb. 8 when the subject of the  Jan. 20-22 government shutdown came up, a showdown prompted by bitter divisions in Congress over the immigration policy known as DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals).


While the Super Bowl had no hint of a national-anthem protest, liberals still found something to be angry about – “cultural appropriation” of two famous black men. Washington Post reporting intern Sonia Rao began: “In 2018, we heard Martin Luther King Jr speak and saw Prince perform during the Supreme Bowl....Both instances sparked immediate backlash online.” NPR implied that somehow you can't find Martin Luther King speeches except in Dodge commercials.


On Sunday, NPR host Michel Martin interviewed Maroon 5 keyboardist P.J. Morton on his solo record and a song that “caught my ear” called “Religion.” The lyrics included: “I don't think I like your religion. Don't always make the best decisions. Not saying you don't have good intentions. I know that you are only human.” Of course, this song was about evangelicals and Donald Trump, and somehow, Trump and his fans were comparable to religious backers of slavery.


Just when it seemed that the ongoing sexual misconduct scandals involving dozens of men in Hollywood, the Democratic Party and the government had finally run its course, Minnesota Public Radio President Jon McTaggart released a statement on Wednesday, January 24, to counter accusations made by Garrison Keillor, the long-time host of the popular program A Prairie Home Companion.


Your taxpayer-supported news producers at PBS and NPR are presenting their latest poll and pronouncing Trump’s first year flopped with the voters: 53 percent said Year One was a failure, while 45 percent picked Success.  

But break down the numbers by party, and the division is predictable: 87 percent of Democrats pronounced Trump a failure, and 87 percent of Republicans checked the success box. Among independents, it was 50 percent failure, 41 percent success, nine percent unsure.

Naturally, NPR didn’t go anywhere near breaking down the parties. Anchor David Greene and political analyst Domenico Montanaro underlined Bad News:


In the midst of reports of the president’s unfortunate reference to immigration from “s---hole” countries, the PBS NewsHour analysts were agreeing with each other on everything on Friday, but NPR’s Week in Review segment brought listeners an actual debate. Conservative Orange County Register columnist John Phillips was back to shock NPR snobs with a pro-Trump set of arguments. 


NPR's All Things Considered on Thursday zeroed in on a pro-life organization that tries to get the employees of abortion facilities to end their participation in the killing of unborn babies. Despite the surprising attention on former Planned Parenthood manager Abby Johnson and her group, And Then There Were None, the public radio program still inserted slanted language into their report. Sarah McCammon labeled the organization an "anti-abortion group." McCammon later noted that Johnson has "gradually been embraced by the anti-abortion rights movement."


On Wednesday, MSNBC was doing its part to spread misinformation that bolsters liberal spin on alleged "voter suppression" by Republicans as anchors Craig Melvin and Hallie Jackson -- hosting MSNBC Live at different times of day -- both wrongly claimed that, according to Ohio law, voters can be removed from the voting rolls if they fail to vote in just two consecutive elections. Washington Post reporter Aaron Blake stepped in to inform them that it actually takes about six years of not voting for a purge to happen -- but even he still fretted that other states might use the Ohio law as precedent to be more restrictive.


On National Public Radio on Saturday morning, Weekend Edition anchor Scott Simon interviewed Ed Martin, a pro-Trump author and Republican Party man, reveling in the Donald Trump-Steve Bannon feud. Simon claimed Bannon said the president has "lost it," meaning his mind. He asked Martin if he was "supporting a president who is incapable of being entrusted" with nuclear weapons?


NPR's Friday night broadcast of All Things Considered offered two younger pundits in their Week in Review segment -- on the left, Vox editor and co-founder Matthew Yglesias and on the right, Rachael Larimore of The Weekly Standard. Both were critical of Trump and professed some shock and fatigue at how Trump dominates the news. But when anchor Ari Shapiro asked about overlooked stories of 2017, even the lefty admitted that the media probably under-emphasized the crushing of ISIS in Trump's first year: