CNN host Christiane Amanpour appeared on Saturday night's All Things Considered on NPR to plug her news series Sex and Love Around the World. Amanpour suggested everywhere in world, "sex is taboo," and we all sufffer in "the current extreme orthodoxy that we all live in, especially around the topic of sex." What world is she describing??



On Wednesday, NPR's Fresh Air devoted more than 36 minutes to promoting transgender Democratic activist Sarah McBride and her new book Tomorrow Will Be Different. It turned harsh on the Republicans near the end: "We went from a presidency of progress to a presidency of prejudice...This has truly become in the last year the most explicitly anti-LGBTQ adminstration we've seen in history." 



Liberal film critics hate the new remake of Death Wish. They REALLY hate it. So much so that it sounds like the NPR, the New York Times and Los Angeles Times reviewers are sharing talking points. Or maybe it's just a lefty mind meld.  



NPR couldn't be bothered to include pro-gun rights talking heads in their Monday coverage of boycotts targeting the National Rifle Association and gun manufacturers. Morning Edition featured pro-gun control activist Shannon Watts during their report on the "more than a dozen companies...cutting ties with the National Rifle Association." However, the program merely read an excerpt from a NRA statement responding to the corporate moves. Hours later, All Things Considered turned to two gun control supporters — California state treasurer John Chiang and Avery Gardiner of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence — during a segment on the anti-gun manufacturers campaign. The evening newscast followed its sister program's lead in leaving out gun rights suppporters from the report.



No one wants to take away your guns. Once more, with feeling -- no one wants to take away your guns. And by the way, did I mention that no one wants to take your guns? Except yeah, they do, again. And yet again while claiming they don't.

Latest media figure to let this cat out of the bag was National Public Radio reporter Mara Liasson, appearing with three of her colleagues on the NPR Politics podcast Feb. 22.



Raoul Peck, the director of the new film, The Young Karl Marx, acclaimed the 19th-century radical leftist on Sunday's All Things Considered on NPR: "Today, his [Marx's] analyses are even more urgent and necessary than before." Anchor Sarah McCammon pointed out, "But hasn't this been tried before many times? I mean, Marx's ideas pervaded, for instance, the Soviet Union." Peck denied this historic reality: "It did not influence the Soviet Union. Marx and Engels would have probably been the first one to be shot....this incredible monster that was fabricated after the Russian Revolution has nothing to do with their ideas."



Everyone knows when the liberal comedians are joking, they're just making up Fake News, right? Or does the audience suspect there's a lot of truth behind the humor? Fans of the weekend NPR news quiz Wait! Wait! Don't Tell Me! heard the notion that President Trump's new budget "slashed" spending on everything, including Medicare and Medicaid. 



The back page of the New York Times magazine typically features a liberal journalist (often Audie Cornish of NPR) interviewing a liberal hero. This Sunday it was April Ryan, the Washington bureau chief for American Urban Radio Networks and analyst for CNN, notorious for her anti-Trump attacks in the White House press room, and her denial of certain realities, in “April Ryan Asks Political Questions No One Else Will.” No matter how ridiculous, ideologically charged, or conspiratorial they may be.



On Tuesday's Fresh Air on NPR, host Terry Gross and her guest, liberal author Joshua Green, discussed how Trump and Trump-affiliated Republicans somehow created an "epidemic" of sexual assault. Green wrote a book on Trump adviser Steve Bannon unsubtly titled Devil's Bargain. Gross briefly mentioned NPR has its own sexual harassment problem ("epidemic"?). 



If National Public Radio political editor Domenico Montanaro is wondering why he's getting the cold shoulder at work these days, this might explain it.

Montanaro was one of four journalists to appear on the NPR Politics podcast for a weekly roundup segment on Feb. 8 when the subject of the  Jan. 20-22 government shutdown came up, a showdown prompted by bitter divisions in Congress over the immigration policy known as DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals).



While the Super Bowl had no hint of a national-anthem protest, liberals still found something to be angry about – “cultural appropriation” of two famous black men. Washington Post reporting intern Sonia Rao began: “In 2018, we heard Martin Luther King Jr speak and saw Prince perform during the Supreme Bowl....Both instances sparked immediate backlash online.” NPR implied that somehow you can't find Martin Luther King speeches except in Dodge commercials.



On Sunday, NPR host Michel Martin interviewed Maroon 5 keyboardist P.J. Morton on his solo record and a song that “caught my ear” called “Religion.” The lyrics included: “I don't think I like your religion. Don't always make the best decisions. Not saying you don't have good intentions. I know that you are only human.” Of course, this song was about evangelicals and Donald Trump, and somehow, Trump and his fans were comparable to religious backers of slavery.