The promoters of Saturday's March For Our Lives claimed that 800,000 attended the DC event. No one believes that — except USA Today, which was clinging to that inflated figure Sunday afternoon, well after more sober observers estimated a 75 percent smaller turnout.



NPR Weekend Edition Saturday welcomed Parkland student leftist David Hogg for an interview, and host Scott Simon offered the typical "how are you coping" and "do you have time to be a teenager" softballs. But when he teed up Hogg to say something political, Hogg was obnoxious.



NPR's All Things Considered on Thursday promoted an activist's own spin about her abortion campaign in Ireland, which likened the cause to the 19th-century effort that helped slaves escape bondage in the Southern United States. Lauren Frayer spotlighted how "there's a sort of modern-day underground railroad discreetly shuttling thousands of Irish women to abortion clinics" outside of the Emerald Isle. This is the same phrase that Mara Clarke of the Abortion Support Network used during a soundbite later in Frayer's report: "You could call it an underground railroad. I prefer to think of it as sisters doing it for themselves."



Liberal National Public Radio expressed alarm on Tuesday that religious conservatives inside the Trump administration are pushing "discrimination" against women seeking abortions and people seeking "gender affirming" surgery. Roger Severino runs a new office at the Department of Health and Human Services defending the religious freedom of health care providers. Liberals don't see religious freedom as a civil right. They want to squash it as a license to deny the liberal sexual agenda. 



CNN host Christiane Amanpour appeared on Saturday night's All Things Considered on NPR to plug her news series Sex and Love Around the World. Amanpour suggested everywhere in world, "sex is taboo," and we all sufffer in "the current extreme orthodoxy that we all live in, especially around the topic of sex." What world is she describing??



On Wednesday, NPR's Fresh Air devoted more than 36 minutes to promoting transgender Democratic activist Sarah McBride and her new book Tomorrow Will Be Different. It turned harsh on the Republicans near the end: "We went from a presidency of progress to a presidency of prejudice...This has truly become in the last year the most explicitly anti-LGBTQ adminstration we've seen in history." 



Liberal film critics hate the new remake of Death Wish. They REALLY hate it. So much so that it sounds like the NPR, the New York Times and Los Angeles Times reviewers are sharing talking points. Or maybe it's just a lefty mind meld.  



NPR couldn't be bothered to include pro-gun rights talking heads in their Monday coverage of boycotts targeting the National Rifle Association and gun manufacturers. Morning Edition featured pro-gun control activist Shannon Watts during their report on the "more than a dozen companies...cutting ties with the National Rifle Association." However, the program merely read an excerpt from a NRA statement responding to the corporate moves. Hours later, All Things Considered turned to two gun control supporters — California state treasurer John Chiang and Avery Gardiner of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence — during a segment on the anti-gun manufacturers campaign. The evening newscast followed its sister program's lead in leaving out gun rights suppporters from the report.



No one wants to take away your guns. Once more, with feeling -- no one wants to take away your guns. And by the way, did I mention that no one wants to take your guns? Except yeah, they do, again. And yet again while claiming they don't.

Latest media figure to let this cat out of the bag was National Public Radio reporter Mara Liasson, appearing with three of her colleagues on the NPR Politics podcast Feb. 22.



Raoul Peck, the director of the new film, The Young Karl Marx, acclaimed the 19th-century radical leftist on Sunday's All Things Considered on NPR: "Today, his [Marx's] analyses are even more urgent and necessary than before." Anchor Sarah McCammon pointed out, "But hasn't this been tried before many times? I mean, Marx's ideas pervaded, for instance, the Soviet Union." Peck denied this historic reality: "It did not influence the Soviet Union. Marx and Engels would have probably been the first one to be shot....this incredible monster that was fabricated after the Russian Revolution has nothing to do with their ideas."



Everyone knows when the liberal comedians are joking, they're just making up Fake News, right? Or does the audience suspect there's a lot of truth behind the humor? Fans of the weekend NPR news quiz Wait! Wait! Don't Tell Me! heard the notion that President Trump's new budget "slashed" spending on everything, including Medicare and Medicaid. 



The back page of the New York Times magazine typically features a liberal journalist (often Audie Cornish of NPR) interviewing a liberal hero. This Sunday it was April Ryan, the Washington bureau chief for American Urban Radio Networks and analyst for CNN, notorious for her anti-Trump attacks in the White House press room, and her denial of certain realities, in “April Ryan Asks Political Questions No One Else Will.” No matter how ridiculous, ideologically charged, or conspiratorial they may be.