On Thursday's edition of the NPR morning talk show 1A, host Joshua Johnson devoted the first hour to promoting the "1619 Project" at The New York Times, which seeks to "reframe" American history as dominated to this very day by slavery. In a town hall meeting transcript that leaked, Times executive editor Dean Baquet explicitly announced  that the project was meant to help the public understand why we narrowly elected Donald Trump in 2016. When Johnson made time for an opposing view, he quoted a note from "Charlie," and the assembled Times team burst out laughing at the idea that this was a partisan narrative. 



On Tuesday morning, syndicated talk-radio host Chris Plante mocked "National Panhandler Radio" for having some seriously high salaries for a taxpayer-subsidized network that begs for listener donations in pledge drives. Plante cited tweets by Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi from the latest IRS 990 form for nonprofits revealing the high salaries of NPR stars. Plante marveled first at Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon, who is a one-day-a-week anchor and yet made $479,578 -- a 16 percent pay hike. 



AllSides, a media technology company that provides media bias ratings and balanced news across the political spectrum, conducted an audit of Google’s “Top Stories” section following the two mass shootings that occurred in Dayton, OH and El Paso, TX last weekend. The findings reveal a heavy preference for CNN and left-leaning media outlets overall, reinforcing previous audits completed by AllSides and researchers at Northwestern University.



The NPR Politics Facebook page promoted their favorite Not-Actually-News story of the day on Thursday: "The Federal Elections Commission has proposed new rules that would further restrict foreign contributions to U.S. election campaigns — including the kind of "dirt" Russians offered the Trump campaign on Hillary Clinton." Reporter Philip Ewing admitted deep in the article "it probably won't advance." But anything liberals propose is news, apparently.  



Longtime NPR Fresh Air host Terry Gross is completely In The Tank for Al Franken. Back in the Dubya years, we contrasted her giggly, tickly Franken interview with a very hostile Bill O'Reilly interview, where he actually stormed out of the studio. Gross is also a big fan of New Yorker writer Jane Mayer, so it's completely predictable that she awarded 43 and a half minutes of national taxpayer-funded radio time to Jane Mayer, who is now insisting Al Franken never should have left the Senate for apparently harmless sexual harassment. 



How freaked out was NPR after the "Send Her Back" chants went around at Trump's rally in North Carolina? On NPR's nationally distributed afternoon show Here & Now on Thursday, host Robin Young heard "brownshirts from Nazi Germany," and NPR political director Ron Elving asserted we were living in an Orwellian dystopia. 



In furious reaction to the president's tweets on Sunday calling for "progressive" Democratic congresswomen who came from other countries to "go back" and change their countries first, many "mainstream" media outlets accused Trump of outright racism. Keith Woods, vice president for newsroom training and diversity with National Public Radio, has a different perspective, asserting that “it is the job of the public, not journalists, to make this type of characterization.”



Democratic candidates generally don't have much to fear from interviews on National Public Radio, but Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep raised our eyebrows by pushing Beto O'Rourke a bit on Friday on what people will be forced to give up under liberal climate-change policies. The liberal media often focus on the Impending Crisis, and then go light on how liberals would crack down on "bad" behaviors.



On Sunday night, taxpayer-funded NPR national correspondent Sarah McCammon got into a Twitter debate with The Daily Mail’s David Martosko in which she endorsed reporters refusing to stand for the national anthem while covering events like campaign rallies because that would mean reporters would be “participat[ing]” and thus endorsing the rally instead of being “there to work.”



This past May, NPR released a guideline for the terminology that should be used in regards to the abortion debate. The guideline stated, “Babies are not babies until they are born” and abortion clinics are “health clinics.” And war is peace and freedom is slavery and ignorance is strength -- just like Orwell said. This morning, following NPR’s lead, The Guardian announced that it will no longer call the Georgia abortion bill “the heartbeat bill” because it is “not medically accurate.” It will now be called “ the six week abortion ban.”



The National Public Radio talk show 1A did an hour on new "restrictive" laws on abortion on Tuesday, but it was not a debate, it was a pro-abortion show. Substitute host Sasha-Ann Simons announced "we want today's conversation to focus on the impact and likely consequences of these laws. Our guests are here to answer your questions, not to debate the topic." The guests were two liberal journalists and an abortionist, who described she can "remove all the pregnancy tissue."



National Public Radio has rotated some other pundits to sit in the "conservative" chair of David Brooks on their Week in Politics review on Fridays, often leading to a better, stronger representation of the conservative viewpoint. Sadly, on Friday, Ramesh Ponnuru of National Review was very Brooks-ish, throwing scorn on the declassification of intelligence that might explain the Russian collusion narrative. It's like he doesn't read Andrew McCarthy at NRO, who argues "Russiagate has always been a political narrative masquerading as a federal investigation."