Contribution records appear to show that the newly hired heads of the National Public Radio Foundation (NPRF) and National Public Radio (NPR) are liberal partisans. So why does NPR continue to receive taxpayer funding? The new Chair of the NPR Foundation Board of Trustees John McGinn gave the maximum-allowed $2,800 to Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s (D-NY) presidential campaign Mar. 2, 2019. 



The New York Times ran a promotional piece on National Public Radio on Monday headlined “NPR, Under Attack by Trump, Is Taking the Threat Seriously.” Only there is no real threat, NPR lies about its federal funding, and the New York Times never mentions it has its own podcast airing on more than 150 NPR stations, a glaring conflict of interest. 



On Sunday, The Washington Post editorial page led with a dramatic and rarely uttered fact check. The headline was “There are no ‘centrists’ – the Democratic primary race is not a choice between change and the status quo.” The Post insisted “every major Democratic candidate is running on an agenda to the left of Mr. Obama’s.” NPR also arrived at this candid and accurate assessment.  



NPR's badly named evening newscast All Things Considered recently devoted two eight-minute segments to anchor Audie Cornish soliciting the radical thoughts of Muslim activists in Dearborn, Michigan. In the first, a man named Iltefat Hamzavi fried up this hate nugget: "I've been at many dinner tables where somebody voted for Trump. And you're like, that's like chickens voting for Chick-fil-A." In the second, they lamented "the media" being unfair to Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib.



National Public Radio (NPR) continues to reinforce the years-old case for why its taxpayer-funding should be pulled by hiring a partisan to head up the entire organization.



Liberal NPR is getting some great PR during impeachment regarding its recent spat with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. The outlet recently boasted an increase in donations as a result of the whole kerfuffle.



On the same CNN Tonight in which host Don Lemon refused to apologize for his venomous Saturday night segment against Trump supporters, Lemon and guests Washington Post journalists Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker hilariously insisted Wednesday that the media are not a political party, “not at war” with the Trump administration, and journalists “apologize” when they get stories “wrong.” Oh, and in the words of Rucker, President Trump exhibits “authoritarian impulses.”



Monday on The View, the hosts defended NPR as an unbiased news outlet after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo yelled at one of their reporters and called her dishonest after a contentious interview. Co-host Meghan McCain wondered if the spat was over the reporter’s liberal bias, the other hosts jumped in to defend NPR and its reporter as unbiased while claiming Pompeo was the one, “not telling the truth.”



One of the most annoying long-term trends in media labeling is using the words "conservative" or "right-wing" to describe not only American conservatives, but the worst tyrants abroad, from Soviet communists to now Iranian terrorists. NPR anchor Mary Louise Kelly interviewed a spokesman for a "right-wing news agency with close ties to Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guard force, or IRGC."



Joshua Caplan at Breitbart noted that NPR's Morning Edition jumped at the chance on Friday to interview the editor of Christianity Today magazine and promote his passionate editorial calling for the removal of President Trump. NPR host Steve Inskeep quoted Galli as saying Trump's Twitter account is "a near perfect example of a human being who is morally lost and confused."



National Public Radio (“NPR”) has historically been criticized for liberal bias. Is it any wonder why, particularly when there’s a money trail from liberal organizations bankrolling an already taxpayer-funded news outlet? Ten liberal organizations, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation ($14,164,937), the Ford Foundation ($12,350,000), the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation ($7,000,000).



The intrusion of protest onto sporting venues is becoming more frequent, and that was evident again Saturday when social justice protesters delayed the start of the second half of a football game between Yale and Harvard. This year alone, two college football games have been marred by protest. As Americans shamed their country at the Pan American Games, anthem kneeling continues in the NFL and major league soccer is a forum for rabid political protest. Saturday's debacle got thumbs up admiration from three members of Congress.