National Public Radio has rotated some other pundits to sit in the "conservative" chair of David Brooks on their Week in Politics review on Fridays, often leading to a better, stronger representation of the conservative viewpoint. Sadly, on Friday, Ramesh Ponnuru of National Review was very Brooks-ish, throwing scorn on the declassification of intelligence that might explain the Russian collusion narrative. It's like he doesn't read Andrew McCarthy at NRO, who argues "Russiagate has always been a political narrative masquerading as a federal investigation."



Best-selling author and talk-radio star Mark Levin has another terrific new book that debuted at number one on the charts. The media habitually ignore Levin's books -- no New York Times reviews, no TV interviews, nothing -- and it must drive them insane that he still sells 1 million copies. But this one's is called Unfreedom of the Press, and this one's a direct shot at them, so some may find it impossible to resist a response. One already has, and in so doing explains why Levin chose to unload on her profession.



Appearing as a panel member on Sunday's Kasie DC on MSNBC, NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg predicted that a circuit court panel would have to be made up of "whack jobs" to side in favor of recently passed laws banning abortion. She also joined with Jeremy Peters of the New York Times to repeat misleading polling claiming that a solid majority of Americans support Roe v. Wade and therefore abortion.



Ramesh Ponnuru at National Review pointed out that NPR standards-and-practices guru Mark Memmott issued a new memo -- a "guidance reminder" -- instructing his taxpayer-funded staff how their language on abortion should not concede anything to "antiabortion groups." It isn't about objectivity. It's about using language to shift public opinion. Unbelievably, this memo is summarized as "We need to be precise, accurate, and neutral."



On Sunday's Up with David Gura on MSNBC, during a discussion of the possibility of impeaching President Donald Trump, NPR's Maria Hinojosa suggested that he be impeached for separating illegal immigrant families and putting children in "cages," characterizing it as an "abuse of power," even though she has herself admitted that the Obama administration did similar things. In fact, she did so more than once.



National Public Radio has been rotating pundits for its Week In Politics roundup in recent months on its evening newscast All Things Considered. Sitting in the "David Brooks chair" on Friday was writer Bethany Mandel (@Bethanyshondark on Twitter). It's encouraging when the conservative half of a public-broadcasting panel actually sounds like a conservative.



The public isn’t alarmed enough about climate change to satisfy NPR talk show host Joshua Johnson, so he suggested on Tuesday morning that, in order to induce fear that will lead to public demands for action, scientists say the human race is in danger of becoming extinct. Johnson noted studies about other calamities, but hasn’t yet heard a scientific report “that says if we don’t do something about this, you and your children...and everyone you love will die!”



The website for the NPR Politics podcast describes it as "where NPR political reporters talk to you like they talk to each other" -- while assuming that conservatives aren't listening. This can lead to unintentionally comedic content, at least for those conservatives who are listening and presumably cringing through the rest of it. NPR Justice Department correspondent Carrie Johnson found "infamy" in William Barr releasing a four-page summary of the Mueller report. 



The month of April saw some dark days for America. On April 19, 1995, it was the Oklahoma City Bombing. On April 15, 2013, it was the Boston marathon bombing. What do those two have in common? Liberal media outlets smeared conservatives as responsible for both. On the April 19, 2010 edition of Countdown, then-MSNBC host Keith Olbermann went on an unhinged rant, assigning Rush Limbaugh culpability for the actions of domestic terrorist Timothy McVeigh: 



Sunday's Washington Post pushed the new liberal sensation on Broadway: a play called What The Constitution Means to Me, written by Heidi Schreck. Here's your spoiler on the plot: the Constitution has never been great. In March, NPR's Fresh Air promoted Scheck under the headline "How Women Have Been 'Profoundly' Left Out Of The U.S. Constitution." Post drama critic Peter Marks marked the play's success by channeling the thrills Harvard professor Laurence Tribe got up his leg over the whole thing.



We have noted many times how the media cannot manage to bring the word "socialism" into the dialogue as Venezuela crumbles into ruin. On NPR's Fresh Air on Tuesday, substitute host Dave Davies chatted for 37 minutes with Nicholas Casey, the "Andes bureau chief" of the New York Times. They talked about about 3,800 words of transcript before the S-word came out, and then it was just informational: "Maduro took over when the previous socialist leader, Hugo Chavez, died in 2013."



Top Obama aide Valerie Jarrett is plugging a new memoir, and in 12 minutes and two interview segments on All Things Considered, NPR had just one challenging question for her: what about this touchy-Biden issue? When they turned to the wider stage of Campaign 2020, it sounded like a Democrat precinct chat, and NPR anchor Audie Cornish seemed to worry that none of the contenders would match the wondrous appeal of Obama, who was... "an idea," not just a person: