Nina Totenberg, National Public Radio's legal affairs correspondent, talked to Grant Reeher on public radio station WRVO, warning about the Supreme Court’s threat to abortion rights, criticizing the hearing performance of Brett Kavanaugh, and denying her outlet’s liberal bias. The NPR member station, which serves New York state from the campus of SUNY-Oswego, posted on Friday some transcribed highlights from Reeher’s half-hour interview with Totenberg, whose liberal bona fides are well-established on NewsBusters.



On Saturday's All Things Considered, NPR host Michel Martin dragged President Trump into a discussion of the dreadful New Zealand mosque murders -- not just Trump, but anyone who likes rhetoric like "build a wall." Her guest was Christian Picciolini, a former white supremacist. NPR and other liberal media have embraced the line that white racist terrorism is a larger global threat than Islamic jihadism. 



On Tuesday's Morning Edition newscast, NPR host Steve Inskeep interviewed freshman Rep. Lauren Underwood, who narrowly defeated conservative Rep. Randy Hultgren in November. Inskeep touted how she's rare as a young black woman who represents a mostly-white district in suburbs and exurbs around Chicago. But boy, did she NOT want to talk about her fellow freshman Ilhan Omar. 



Is it any wonder that American news consumers are at the end of their ropes of patience with the “mainstream media?” Three weeks ago, when I first documented troubling questions, contradictions and doubts about Trump-hating, attention-craving actor Jussie Smollett's absurd hate crime claims, few in the “professional” journalism herd paid heed. Now, with a grand jury investigation on the horizon, everyone's a Johnny-come-lately debunker. And everyone's making excuses: How could we have known? Why would anyone lie about racism? What could have possibly prepared us for such a scandalous swindle?



If we have to keep paying for National Public Radio, is it too much to ask that it does some actual journalism? (Or just play classical music?) Regurgitating press releases from discredited lefty scammers may thrill the pledge drive and totebag types, but the rest of us just ain’t getting our money’s worth.



High atop the list of old habits in media that will never die: kneejerk apologia for the failed utopia known as the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Russian President and former KGB spook Vladimir Putin isn't alone in pining for its glories. During a weekly roundup of the NPR Politics podcast on Feb. 14, Domenico Montanaro, the state-funded radio network's "lead political editor," chided Republicans for having the audacity to use Democrats' swooning for socialism against them.



NPR's Morning Edition on Monday split its Andrew McCabe interview into two segments. On the home page they were promoting Russiagate: "Andrew McCabe, Ex-FBI Deputy, Describes 'Remarkable' Number Of Trump-Russia Contacts." On air, that segment never mentioned his lying under oath to the FBI. There was a second segment simply titled "Andrew McCabe Discusses His Firing." McCabe's answers were often refusals to answer, which Inskeep spun as "exceptionally careful." Kudos to NPR for trying to explore it, briefly. 



There are times that women complain about sexism in politics where they just sound ridiculous. Take the Friday night "Week in Politics" roundup on National Public Radio. Host Mary Louise Kelly was outraged by a Huffington Post story on Sen. Amy Klobuchar, expected to announce a presidential run. See if you can believe this complaint. Kelly claimed "I don't remember a lot of Are Men Nice Enough stories" in the 2016 campaign! 



Our friend Joe Concha with The Hill was in rare form on Friday’s Fox & Friends, ripping everyone from Chuck Todd for not fact-checking Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) about the Green New Deal to late night comics for their refusal to lampoon her to the double standard regarding the scandals rocking the three state-wide Democrats in Virginia.



Liberal journalists like Brian Stelter touted a Trump State of the Union speech as a "Super Bowl for fact checkers." This didn't used to be the case when Obama was president.But several "fact checks" flopped badly.



Black journalists are putting their racial resentments ahead of the facts on the Jussie Smollett case. On Friday's NPR talk show 1A, guest host Todd Zwillich asked Washington Post editorial writer Jonathan Capehart (black and gay) to discuss the "reported" attack on Smollett, a star of the Fox drama Empire (black and gay). There was no "alleged" anything in Capehart's proclamation, and Capehart was very quick to blame Trump and his rhetoric for the alleged violence:



On Friday, the Ruth Bader Ginsburg biopic On The Basis of Sex expanded into more than 1,900 theaters. So the puff piece on Thursday's Morning Edition on NPR served like an informercial. NPR host Rachel Martin interviewed Felicity Jones (who plays Ginsburg) and director Mimi Leder. Jones gushed "Well, initially, I was very, very intimidated. And it's nerve-wracking paying such a beloved woman. And I, myself, am a huge, huge fan of her." Not discussed: where the film is Fake News.