How freaked out was NPR after the "Send Her Back" chants went around at Trump's rally in North Carolina? On NPR's nationally distributed afternoon show Here & Now on Thursday, host Robin Young heard "brownshirts from Nazi Germany," and NPR political director Ron Elving asserted we were living in an Orwellian dystopia. 



In furious reaction to the president's tweets on Sunday calling for "progressive" Democratic congresswomen who came from other countries to "go back" and change their countries first, many "mainstream" media outlets accused Trump of outright racism. Keith Woods, vice president for newsroom training and diversity with National Public Radio, has a different perspective, asserting that “it is the job of the public, not journalists, to make this type of characterization.”



Democratic candidates generally don't have much to fear from interviews on National Public Radio, but Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep raised our eyebrows by pushing Beto O'Rourke a bit on Friday on what people will be forced to give up under liberal climate-change policies. The liberal media often focus on the Impending Crisis, and then go light on how liberals would crack down on "bad" behaviors.



On Sunday night, taxpayer-funded NPR national correspondent Sarah McCammon got into a Twitter debate with The Daily Mail’s David Martosko in which she endorsed reporters refusing to stand for the national anthem while covering events like campaign rallies because that would mean reporters would be “participat[ing]” and thus endorsing the rally instead of being “there to work.”



This past May, NPR released a guideline for the terminology that should be used in regards to the abortion debate. The guideline stated, “Babies are not babies until they are born” and abortion clinics are “health clinics.” And war is peace and freedom is slavery and ignorance is strength -- just like Orwell said. This morning, following NPR’s lead, The Guardian announced that it will no longer call the Georgia abortion bill “the heartbeat bill” because it is “not medically accurate.” It will now be called “ the six week abortion ban.”



The National Public Radio talk show 1A did an hour on new "restrictive" laws on abortion on Tuesday, but it was not a debate, it was a pro-abortion show. Substitute host Sasha-Ann Simons announced "we want today's conversation to focus on the impact and likely consequences of these laws. Our guests are here to answer your questions, not to debate the topic." The guests were two liberal journalists and an abortionist, who described she can "remove all the pregnancy tissue."



National Public Radio has rotated some other pundits to sit in the "conservative" chair of David Brooks on their Week in Politics review on Fridays, often leading to a better, stronger representation of the conservative viewpoint. Sadly, on Friday, Ramesh Ponnuru of National Review was very Brooks-ish, throwing scorn on the declassification of intelligence that might explain the Russian collusion narrative. It's like he doesn't read Andrew McCarthy at NRO, who argues "Russiagate has always been a political narrative masquerading as a federal investigation."



Best-selling author and talk-radio star Mark Levin has another terrific new book that debuted at number one on the charts. The media habitually ignore Levin's books -- no New York Times reviews, no TV interviews, nothing -- and it must drive them insane that he still sells 1 million copies. But this one's is called Unfreedom of the Press, and this one's a direct shot at them, so some may find it impossible to resist a response. One already has, and in so doing explains why Levin chose to unload on her profession.



Appearing as a panel member on Sunday's Kasie DC on MSNBC, NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg predicted that a circuit court panel would have to be made up of "whack jobs" to side in favor of recently passed laws banning abortion. She also joined with Jeremy Peters of the New York Times to repeat misleading polling claiming that a solid majority of Americans support Roe v. Wade and therefore abortion.



Ramesh Ponnuru at National Review pointed out that NPR standards-and-practices guru Mark Memmott issued a new memo -- a "guidance reminder" -- instructing his taxpayer-funded staff how their language on abortion should not concede anything to "antiabortion groups." It isn't about objectivity. It's about using language to shift public opinion. Unbelievably, this memo is summarized as "We need to be precise, accurate, and neutral."



On Sunday's Up with David Gura on MSNBC, during a discussion of the possibility of impeaching President Donald Trump, NPR's Maria Hinojosa suggested that he be impeached for separating illegal immigrant families and putting children in "cages," characterizing it as an "abuse of power," even though she has herself admitted that the Obama administration did similar things. In fact, she did so more than once.



National Public Radio has been rotating pundits for its Week In Politics roundup in recent months on its evening newscast All Things Considered. Sitting in the "David Brooks chair" on Friday was writer Bethany Mandel (@Bethanyshondark on Twitter). It's encouraging when the conservative half of a public-broadcasting panel actually sounds like a conservative.