Time Warner Cable is trying to be in the news business, and is currently engaging in such efforts in 22 locations in five states.

Unless it wants to be yet another unreliable, hopelessly biased news source, it needs to try harder. Take this November 14 report from north-central North Carolina's Triad area on the city of Greensboro's effort to get residents to turn in unwanted guns. Keep in mind, the reference is to multiple "firearms" (HT Hot Air; presented in full because of its brevity, and for fair use and discussion purposes):



The New York Times Magazine cover story by political correspondent Jim Rutenberg, "A Dream Undone -- Inside the 50-year campaign to roll back the Voting Rights Act," is a 10-part, 10,000-word doorstop (issued with the baleful threat "The first in a series") comparing current attempts to stop voter fraud as a return to Jim Crow, with particular focus on North Carolina. Rutenberg also relayed more Times misinformation about Ronald Reagan's 1980 campaign and his appeal to "states rights" in Mississippi.



As a parent, one of the most heart wrenching things you can go through in life is the loss of a child, and no less traumatizing for the parent is when this loss is by suicide. However, there are some in the media that feel no compunction in using a situation like this to take political shots at a person if he holds different views politically, especially if the parent is a politician. This callousness was exemplified recently by Indy Week reporter Jane Porter.



New York Times reporter Jonathan Mahler covered the damning indictment of Rolling Stone magazine's story of a gang rape at the University of Virginia, but skipped his own paper's disgraceful coverage of a previous campus rape hoax -- involving the Duke lacrosse team in 2006.



After making no mention on Wednesday evening or Thursday morning, NBC continued its streak on Thursday's NBC Nightly News of ignoring the militant atheism and liberalism of the North Carolina man accused of killing three Muslim-Americans. While none of the three networks have alluded to Craig Stepehn Hicks’s liberal beliefs, what differed from each of the past two network news cycles was that CBS dropped any mention of Hicks’s atheism after correspondent Vicente Arenas had included it in reports on Wednesday’s CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley and Thursday’s CBS This Morning.



The Charlotte Observer seems to be suffering from a vanishing-Kay-Hagan-scandal problem today. Republicans seized on a new story (cached here) on how Senator Hagan's husband benefited from the "stimulus" program. But the link went into "Page Not Found."

Local TV station WBTV was reporting that the Hagan family self-dealing is under "further legal review." That's not a great story for the weekend before the election. Is that why its link broke? It reported this:



While many on the Left spent last week using the terrorist attack in Canada to promote their gun control agendas, all three major networks managed to overlook a newsworthy story that supported gun rights. On October 20 in North Carolina, a grandfather used a gun to successfully protect his family from violent home invaders.



On July 24, it was discovered that Senator John Walsh (D-Mont.) had plagiarized his thesis statement as part of earning a master’s degree from the United States Army War College and led to the College revoking his degree on October 10. Back on August 7, Walsh announced that he would not be seeking reelection (as he originally planned) and would leave office after his term ends. 

Throughout the whole scandal, the “big three” networks of ABC, CBS, and NBC combined for only one story in the form of a news brief on CBS This Morning on July 24 that lasted for 31 seconds.



James Hohmann of Politico reported on a "nearly million-dollar" ad buy by Planned Parenthood against two Republican Senate challengers who are "taking heat for their strident opposition to abortion."

It's apparently not "strident" when the Democratic incumbents they're challenging get 100-percent ratings from the "pro-choice" crowd.



MSNBC may be gearing up for another election season of war on women. The Hardball host on Friday speculated whether the Republican senatorial candidate from North Carolina engaged in sexism by aggressively attacking his Democratic opponent. Before showing clips of Thom Tillis sparring with Senator Kay Hagan, Matthews sneered, "But sometimes, the more we watch, the more we avert our eyes." 

The cable anchor lectured, "...Talking down to your female opponent may not be the best strategy." Matthews connected the debate to George H.W. Bush's 1984 vice presidential debate with Geraldine Ferraro. 



Still worried about North Carolina's swing to the right, the New York Times is scouring for evidence that the state's conservative rollback of taxes and regulations is backfiring on Republicans. The political infighting made the front page of Saturday's Times, which typically buries state political news on the back pages: "Move to Center Divides G.O.P. in N. Carolina."

Reporter Richard Fausset set the scene from Raleigh, attempting to show a GOP that's gone too far and is now frantically scrabbling back to the center. State Speaker of the House Thom Tillis is trying to win a U.S. Senate seat, yet finds himself (in the paper's loaded language) "caught between the hard-right face of the last session and his likely need to appeal to more moderate voters..."



Instapundit cracked wise this morning: “How can a Libertarian get favorable treatment in The Washington Post? Be in a position to deliver a Senate seat to the Dems.”

In a front-page article on Monday, Post reporters Reid Wilson and Karen Tumulty cited the precedent of last year’s gubernatorial race in Virginia – where Democrat Terry McAuliffe won with a 2.6 percent margin of victory while “libertarian” Robert Sarvis drew 6.5 percent – to hope for a pizza delivery man named Sean Haugh to stop the Republicans from winning in North Carolina: