Taxpayer-funded PBS and NPR are now in the polling business with Marist College, and like the other networks, their polls are often used to support putting heat on Republicans. On Wednesday, they announced they had found a majority of Americans were disappointed with the president’s responsive to the violence in Charlottesville. PBS then ignored their own finding that 62 percent favored leaving Confederate statues in place, while only 27 percent want them removed. NPR reported it once, and then insisted that had nothing to do with Charlottesville.

Buried in the weeds: They also asked if Americans approve or disapprove of Black Lives Matter: 50 percent disapproved, and only 33 percent approved. They even asked about approval of Antifa, but few had heard of them yet: Five percent approved, 24 percent disapproved.


As expected, on Friday night the PBS NewsHour greeted the failure to repeal Obamacare as a happy "flame-out" by the Republican Party, and pseudo-conservative PBS pundit David Brooks insisted it's time for Republicans to "wrap their minds around the fact" that Americans want to preserve health care as a "right." 


Monday's PBS NewsHour spotlighted the low trust in the news media, according to the results of their latest poll. Only 30 percent of those surveyed by NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist trust the press "a good deal" or "a great amount." The Trump administration scored seven points better in the same poll. Guest Stuart Rothenberg bemoaned the "horrible trend" towards distrust of the media over the past several decades.


It shouldn’t be surprising that a government-funded broadcasting service would happily promote a socialist Christian preacher that eschews all those old conservative Christian concerns like prayer in school, abortion, and homosexuality – even calling that “heresy” and “theological malpractice.” The puff piece subject was Rev. William Barber, who started a series of leftist protests of the Republican governor he called “Moral Mondays.” There was no rebuttal from the conservatives.


Here's why people hate the liberal tilt of public broadcasting. Both PBS and NPR buried the Scalise shooting in their "week in review" segments. When the PBS NewsHour arrived there, anchor Judy Woodruff couldn't even mention the shooter was a Bernie Sanders campaign volunteer, couldn't mention his favorite TV shows, and couldn't ponder if anyone on the Left could have provoked him with their outrageous statements. Instead, liberal analyst Mark Shields blamed it on Newt Gingrich, and his "clone" Donald Trump: 


On Tuesday, the PBS NewsHour featured a report on teaching public school students to spot fake news on the internet. One of the articles that PBS gave as an example was a Breitbart article about religious freedom in the military.


On Thursday night’s PBS NewsHour, Senator Mike Lee (R-Utah) called out anchor Judy Woodruff for using a much different style of questioning than she used for Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown of California. 


Geoffrey Dickens noted Charlie Rose interviewed Al Franken for most of his hour on Wednesday and never brought up Kathy Griffin. The same thing happened on the PBS NewsHour. And a search of National Public Radio transcripts comes up empty for Kathy Griffin stories.​ So much for public broadcasting standing against the coarsening of public discourse. (UPDATED: NPR media correspondent tweeted that he did a one-minute report in hourly newscasts.)


Did you know that Medicaid spending isn’t even a big deal? So says Sasha Pudelski, a spokesperson for of the DC lobbying outfit AASA, when she was interviewed by PBS’s William Brangham who didn’t seem to find anything wrong with that statement.


After Brookings Institution Senior Fellow Benjamin Wittes, a friend of fired FBI Director James Comey, took to PBS to accuse President Trump of a “calculated” attempt to “compromise” Comey simply by shaking the law enforcement chief’s hand at a White House event, the media ran wild with the story on Friday as another controversy for the commander-in-chief.


On Friday's regular "Shields and Brooks" segment on PBS Newshour, New York Times columnist David Brooks -- the supposedly more right-leaning half of the pairing -- oddly seemed to wish for some sort of "apocalypse" to beset the Donald Trump administration as he theorized and predicted that some scandal or "grievous blow" to the White House might inspire more bipartisanship in the aftermath. After host Judy Woodruff was surprised by his prediction of an "apocalypse," he only walked back his bizarre choice of words slightly: "Well, I -- that word came out -- I should have stuck with 'acidity.' That would have been a better word."


Open.President Trump's budget proposes defunding the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. If it passes Congress, it will take two years for funding to be discontinued, but the liberal public-media lobby is panicking.  These hyperbole artists insist "Our public media is for everyone." That's just a lie. Conservatives are not welcome in public media.