Anthony Breznican interviewed the renowned horror novelist Stephen King for the New York Times: “Life Is Imitating Stephen King’s Art, and That Scares Him -- In his 61st novel, “The Institute,” children with supernatural abilities are taken from their parents and incarcerated. Sound familiar?” In case that subhead wasn’t obvious enough, the Times is referring to Trump “locking kids up.” King spouted: “All I can say is that I wrote it in the Trump era. I’ve felt more and more a sense that people who are weak, and people who are disenfranchised and people who aren’t the standard, white American, are being marginalized."



On Monday morning, in the aftermath of a mass shooting spree in Texas from the weekend, CNN personalities were again pushing for more gun laws, including "universal background checks." CNN's three-hour New Day morning show discussed the issue in four segments, and only had guests with left-leaning views on the issue of gun control. Not only did liberal Republican contributor Ana Navarro slam the NRA and declare that she was "sick" of politicians giving "thoughts and prayers" instead of passing more gun control, CNN contributor Andrew McCabe made the questionable claim that "universal background checks" might have prevented two high-profile mass shootings as he repeated the myth of the Charleston loophole.



The front of Monday’s New York Times featured reporter Lisa Lerer on failed feminist Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who tacked hard to the left on immigration and gun control in a failed attempt to appeal to today’s Democratic Party: “Gillibrand’s Failed Run Shows Feminism’s Promise and Limits.” It was a quite different scenario 21 months ago, when the paper launched her 2020 campaign on the front of the Sunday National section, under the large-type, incredibly sycophantic headline “Senator’s Star Shines as Nation Unites Behind Her Cause -- Gillibrand, Long a Champion of Women, Stays Out Front in a Cultural Reckoning.”



It’s was ten years ago last week that journalist Melissa Lafsky speculated that Mary Jo Kopechne, the woman Ted Kennedy left to drown, would be fine with the Democrat’s reprehensible behavior. On August 27, 2009, Lafsky, who at one time worked for the New York Times’s Freakonomics blog, wrote: "[One wonders what] Mary Jo Kopechne would have had to say about Ted's death, and what she'd have thought of the life and career that are being (rightfully) heralded. Who knows -- maybe she'd feel it was worth it." 



New York Times reporter Sarah Lyall made the front page on Sunday with the vital news that Trump’s tweets have contain misspellings: "...Leaving aside its splenetic tone and in-your-face ad hominem attacks, knee-jerk defensiveness and ugly, dog-whistle language, why is so much of the direct communication from the president to the world heaving with bad grammar, bad spelling, bizarre punctuation, muddy diction and inexplicable random capitalization?" But the paper insisted this went far beyond misspelling.



New York Times columnist Bret Stephens is doubling down on his fury at being described as a "bedbug" on Twitter by college professor David Karpf. He's still comparing this little Twitter insult to Hitler. His latest Times column was headlined "World War II and the Ingredients of Slaughter: The spirit of certitude that dominated the politics of the 1930s is not so distant from us today."



Keep government spending at high levels or die young. That’s the stark choice offered by reporter Stephen Castle in Saturday’s New York Times, “Why Are Britons Living Shorter Lives? – Austerity and Illness begin to Take a Toll.” The online headline deck: “Shortchanged: Why British Life Expectancy Is Falling -- For the first time in modern history, Britons are living shorter lives, with poor lifestyles, depression and budget cuts the leading causes.” Apparently the paper lacks historical sense, forgetting what actual austerity in Britain was like (not just today’s metaphorical “austerity”) during World War II and even years afterward;



An international research team has just published a controversial genetic study that claims that “it is impossible to use genes to predict someone’s sexuality,” throwing more skepticism on the idea that homosexuals are born that way. However media sites reporting on the issue were quick to downplay the study’s implications, insisting that either way, “same-sex sexual behavior is ‘simply a natural part of our diversity as a species.’”



New York Times reporter Jeremy Peters marked 10 years since the launch of the Tea Party movement, which spread with huge yet peaceful rallies against encroaching federal government, specifically Obamacare. Needless to say, the landmark was greeted in hostile fashion by the paper. The headline gave this backhanded compliment: “Tea Party Failed to Tame Deficits, but It Succeeded in Fueling Rage.” Peters launched his account with loaded language that stereotyped limited government Tea Party advocates as crazed, angry, and (after pressure from liberal readers) racist radicals.



A new poll from Rasmussen Reports reveals most Americans believe that journalists are more liberal than they are, and deserve scrutiny, despite the fervent objections from The New York Times. There’s even more bad news for the liberal media: the majority also agreed President Trump’s attacks on the press were “appropriate.”



The New York Times has begun a major initiative, the “1619 Project,” to observe the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. It aims to reframe American history so that slavery and the contributions of black Americans explain who we are as a nation. Nikole Hannah-Jones, staff writer for The New York Times Magazine wrote the lead article, “America Wasn't a Democracy, Until Black Americans Made It One.” 



A day before the deadline to qualify for the next Democratic debate, The New York Times published a story about liberal billionaire Tom Steyer that boosted his narrative of being an “outsider” and a “populist” seeking reform. The Times original headline supported that narrative by describing Steyer as someone trying to “get money out of politics.” As noted by the Election Law Blog, that headline read: “Tom Steyer Is Spending Millions to Get Money Out of Politics.”