New York Times columnist Michelle Goldberg danced a jig on the grave of the Grand Old Party and admitted that the presence of Trump in the White House literally keeps her up at night in “Dare We Dream of the End of the G.O.P.? -- In a new book, the pollster Stanley Greenberg predicts a blue tidal wave in 2020.” She confessed that Democratic pollster Stanley Greenberg's confidence "will not be enough to lessen the insomnia that has plagued me since the cursed night when Trump was elected."



The press has targeted Ken Cuccinelli for a long time, both when he was a conservative Attorney General for Virginia and now that he oversees immigration policy in the Trump administration. Loosening immigration is a major priority for the Times, so it’s no surprise they take their shot at Cuccinelli as well, in a large hit piece Friday. Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Maggie Haberman reported “The Public Face of Homeland Security Also Ruffles Its Feathers. A Lot.” The text box was accusatory: “Aggressively pushing policies with little concern for legalities."



It doesn’t get any wilder or more depressing for our society than this. In an effort to subvert any sense of decency, especially for the most fragile among us, the left has produced a drag queen show featuring cast members with Down syndrome. As if that’s not deplorable enough, the Republican in charge of the Michigan venue where a set was to be performed was hit by the ACLU for barring it from happening, because shame on him for not letting Down Syndrome folks express themselves.

 


On Thursday, we noted CNN's New Day skipped over Joe Biden's bloody eyeball during the seven-hour CNN Town Hall on climate change, despite it being an all-day Drudge Report item. But then something happened that we didn't expect: CNN never reported it. Neither did MSNBC. Neither did ABC, CBS, NBC, or PBS. Even The New York Times and The Washington Post skipped it. Fox News covered it, but not obsessively. Deborah Norville on Inside Edition covered it as no big deal. Why couldn't the others?



The bruising political backlash against British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his aggressive push in Parliament for a “no deal” exit from the European Union led Thursday’s New York Times. The paper blamed Brexit for everything wrong in British politics while mocking a social conservative politician for lying down on a Parliament bench: "...it was a devastating look, seeming to confirm critics’ worst fears about a government of smug, entitled private school types sleepwalking into a no-deal Brexit that could wreck the economy and starve Britons of food and medicine."



As the Bahamas reels from the death and destruction Hurricane Dorian caused, the news media continue to exaggerate a connection between hurricanes to climate change. Claims ranged from global warming making it “bigger, wetter — and more deadly,” to calling Dorian’s stall a “signal of climate change,” to insisting climate change is “worsening” hurricanes (without proof).



Anthony Breznican interviewed the renowned horror novelist Stephen King for the New York Times: “Life Is Imitating Stephen King’s Art, and That Scares Him -- In his 61st novel, “The Institute,” children with supernatural abilities are taken from their parents and incarcerated. Sound familiar?” In case that subhead wasn’t obvious enough, the Times is referring to Trump “locking kids up.” King spouted: “All I can say is that I wrote it in the Trump era. I’ve felt more and more a sense that people who are weak, and people who are disenfranchised and people who aren’t the standard, white American, are being marginalized."



On Monday morning, in the aftermath of a mass shooting spree in Texas from the weekend, CNN personalities were again pushing for more gun laws, including "universal background checks." CNN's three-hour New Day morning show discussed the issue in four segments, and only had guests with left-leaning views on the issue of gun control. Not only did liberal Republican contributor Ana Navarro slam the NRA and declare that she was "sick" of politicians giving "thoughts and prayers" instead of passing more gun control, CNN contributor Andrew McCabe made the questionable claim that "universal background checks" might have prevented two high-profile mass shootings as he repeated the myth of the Charleston loophole.



The front of Monday’s New York Times featured reporter Lisa Lerer on failed feminist Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who tacked hard to the left on immigration and gun control in a failed attempt to appeal to today’s Democratic Party: “Gillibrand’s Failed Run Shows Feminism’s Promise and Limits.” It was a quite different scenario 21 months ago, when the paper launched her 2020 campaign on the front of the Sunday National section, under the large-type, incredibly sycophantic headline “Senator’s Star Shines as Nation Unites Behind Her Cause -- Gillibrand, Long a Champion of Women, Stays Out Front in a Cultural Reckoning.”



It’s was ten years ago last week that journalist Melissa Lafsky speculated that Mary Jo Kopechne, the woman Ted Kennedy left to drown, would be fine with the Democrat’s reprehensible behavior. On August 27, 2009, Lafsky, who at one time worked for the New York Times’s Freakonomics blog, wrote: "[One wonders what] Mary Jo Kopechne would have had to say about Ted's death, and what she'd have thought of the life and career that are being (rightfully) heralded. Who knows -- maybe she'd feel it was worth it." 



New York Times reporter Sarah Lyall made the front page on Sunday with the vital news that Trump’s tweets have contain misspellings: "...Leaving aside its splenetic tone and in-your-face ad hominem attacks, knee-jerk defensiveness and ugly, dog-whistle language, why is so much of the direct communication from the president to the world heaving with bad grammar, bad spelling, bizarre punctuation, muddy diction and inexplicable random capitalization?" But the paper insisted this went far beyond misspelling.



New York Times columnist Bret Stephens is doubling down on his fury at being described as a "bedbug" on Twitter by college professor David Karpf. He's still comparing this little Twitter insult to Hitler. His latest Times column was headlined "World War II and the Ingredients of Slaughter: The spirit of certitude that dominated the politics of the 1930s is not so distant from us today."