On Monday's New Day show, CNN devoted a segment to the story of a Romanian baby, Constanin Mutu, who was taken from his father by Border Patrol last year as they arrived to seek asylum, and hinted that it was somehow nefarious for the Trump administration to do so before the zero tolerance policy had been announced publicly.



New York Times reporter Andy Newman has followed up on his guilt-ridden travel piece in the paper’s um, Travel section (headlined under the buzzkillking title, “Travel’s Climate Problem – If to see the world is also to help destroy it, should we just stay home?”). Page two of Monday’s New York Times featured Newman responding to readers crushed that Newman actually went on holiday abroad: “Weighing the Cost of Personal Travel.” Fortunately he received “dispensation” from the Vatican of Vacations, the National Resources Defense Council, a left-wing environmental organization with some wacky ideas about mercury.



With scenes of rape, incestual sex, decapitations, and child executions, Game of Thrones was considered one of the most graphic shows on TV until its conclusion last month. Yet somehow, HBO’s latest teen drama Euphoria makes Game of Thrones look family-friendly in comparison.The Parents Television Council has issued an urgent warning to parents against the new show, but the media has mostly dismissed the alert, showering the graphic teen-targeted show with praise.



Something fascinating happened in The New York Times Book Review on Sunday. They offered five separate reviews of books by "conservatives," even as they continued to ignore the number-one nonfiction book at the top of their own Best Sellers list: Unfreedom of the Press by Mark Levin. 



The New York Times Magazine on June 17 posted a mammoth, 8000-plus word profile on 2020 Democratic contender Elizabeth Warren. The headline for this very long article informed readers, “Elizabeth Warren Is Completely Serious.” The sub-headline sounded even more like a press release: “About income inequality. About corporate power. About corrupt politics. And about being America’s next president.”



The front page of Saturday’s New York Times featured White House correspondent Peter Baker’s “news analysis” on Iran and attacks on oil tankers, “Trump’s Foggy Truth Meets Fog of War.” Ostensibly on the controversy over Iran’s culpability in the attack on oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman, but Baker, whose reporting has grown harsher and more partisan against President Trump, used the crisis as a springboard to attack Trump as a liar who can’t be trusted while the threat of conflict looms: "...for a president known for falsehoods and crisis-churning bombast, the test of credibility appears far more daunting."



Still more evidence that the New York Times will analyze everything Trump does only in the most cynical political terms, reporters Annie Karni and Maggie Haberman immediately put President Trump on the defensive by reducing his administration’s bipartisan criminal justice reform plan to raw political cynicism in Friday’s edition: “The White House Subject Was Criminal Justice. The Subtext was 2020.” It’s galling that the Times, after complaining for years of Republicans using tough-on-crime, gun-rights, anti-gay-marriage stances as “wedge issues,” are now calling reforming the justice system a “wedge issue”!



Friday’s New York Times showed the paper again trying to falsely link the publicly harmful anti-vaccination movement to political conservatism. Reporters Julie Bosman, Patricia Mazzei, and Dan Levin drew the strands together for “Celebrities, Conservatives and Immigrants in Disparate Groups of Skeptics.” It’s not the first time the paper has tried to falsely smear “conservatives” as the main thrust of anti-vaccine action, even though the most recent polling on the matter suggests it’s more of a left-wing cause. Amazingly for a story whose headline blasts “conservatives” for being anti-vaccine, the first sentence features Robert F. Kennedy Jr. from the famous uber-liberal Democrat political family.



On CNN's New Day, New York Times reporter and CNN analyst Maggie Haberman said "Joe Biden's core strength is his decency," and claimed the Trump campaign is "having a very hard time figuring out how to attack that." We'll leave on the table whether the Avenatti-Stormy Network has the credentials to talk about anyone's "decency." But Haberman's phrasing is strange. Trump doesn't have trouble "figuring out" how to attack anyone. Maybe liberal reporters think the punches won't land, but he's going to punch.



The New York Times is still trying to refurbish the thuggish reputation of the Communist regime of East Germany, once part of the Eastern Bloc, Soviet-aligned countries of Eastern Europe. The latest sad example came from reporter Thomas Rogers in Berlin, dedicated to the now-demolished Palast der Republik. The online headline: “Symbol of a Brutal Regime? Or a Fun Place to Party?” Rogers was gentle with the monstrous East German regime: "...it still arouses nostalgia among some former citizens who fondly remember its gender egalitarianism and social safety net or admire its utopian aspirations."



In Monday’s New York Times, reporter Eleanor Stanford interviewed the showrunner for The Handmaid’s Tale, “Seeking to Be More Than TV Medicine -- Bruce Miller wanted Season 3 of ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ to be entertaining above all else.” Stanford opens with a feverish description of life in present-day America. The opening paragraphs are a particular hoot: "What do you do when reality starts looking uncomfortably like your dystopian fiction?" A similar social liberal overreaction could be found with reporter Ernesto Londono fretting over “State Dept. Alters Stance On Showing Pride Flags.” The text box: “Quietly abandoning gay rights as a foreign policy imperative.”



New York Times reporter Andy Newman led off the Sunday Travel section with a buzzkill, “Travel’s Climate Problem – If to see the world is also to help destroy it, should we just stay home?” So will the New York Times do the right thing, stop being an accessory to climate murder and kill off their travel section and the paper's very own branded, themed cruises (cruise ships, Newman assures us, are even more polluting than planes)? Also, teens in Portland, Ore. have put "climate justice" in the classroom, to the delight of the Times.