In the wake of the Friday indictments of Russians by special counsel Robert Mueller, several media outlets have found a highly disingenuous way to continue attacking President Donald Trump as claiming collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign is a "hoax" or "fake news." Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosensteini explicitly stated they presented no evidence of collusion in the indictment, but somehow, he made Trump's "hoax claim harder to sell." 


New York Times reporter Katrin Bennhold’s front-page story commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall, “Still Chipping Away at a Wall Demolished a Generation Ago,” contained an incredibly ignorant paragraph about the freedoms of East German women: "Eastern women, who were part of the work force and with free child care, were more emancipated than their western sisters...." But it's far from the worst Times story celebrating the former East Germany.


MRCTV's Brittany M. Hughes reported Monday that Kehinde Wiley, Barack Obama's official portrait artist, previously created two paintings of black women holding white women's severed heads, making him the art world's equivalent of Donald Trump severed-head comedienne Kathy Griffin. Additionally, Wiley, described in New York Magazine as "possibly the wealthiest painter of his generation," outsources much of "his" painting to China to "cut costs." Establishment press coverage has virtually ignored these components of Wiley's background, but their descriptions of Obama's involvement in selecting him reveal his almost certain awareness of the artist's full portfolio.


New York Times’ reporter Jennifer Schuessler provided the latest entry in the paper’s strange admiration for left-wing dictators, and those “intellectuals” that admire them. Tribute to Castro-loving Communist Angela Davis on the front of Wednesday’s Arts page, “The Davis Papers: Harvard Gets Them – Angela Davis’s personal archive traces her evolution from obscurity to activist.” Schuessler gushed, "Now she has achieved canonization of a more scholarly sort."


The New York Times, the self-described paragon of journalism, embarrassed itself thoroughly Tuesday when it hired, and hours later fired, a "lead opinion writer" brought on to focus "on the power, culture and consequences of technology" — because the paper inadequately investigated her Twitter history.


Every two years, Americans unite around the television to root for U.S. athletes and their dreams of gold medals come true. Unless you’re a journalist. Then the Olympics are a time to root against your country and her president on the world stage. At the opening ceremonies in South Korea, organizers strangely seated Vice President Mike Pence just a few feet from Kim Yo-jong, the sister of North Korea’s communist dictator. To American reporters who hate Trump, a star was born. Just the summaries on Twitter were enough to make you throw your phone across the room.


The February 2018 stock market correction was painful to watch, but the news media exaggerated the situation — piling on panic and blame with descriptions like “crash” and “freefall” — after ignoring most previous records.


New York Times Opinion editor and frequent guest on HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher, Bari Weiss drew the ire of both the left and right Monday after she tried to score a political point using false information. Weiss tweeted out praise for U.S. skater, Mirai Nagasu, who became the first female U.S. Olympian to land a triple axel. Weiss congratulated Nagasu by touting, “immigrants get the job done.”

 

At the New York Times on Saturday (Sunday's print edition), reporter Robert Pear seemed unhappy that the Trump administration is reining in an extra-legal tool used by the government's regulatory leviathan. Reading his article's headline — "Administration Imposes Sweeping Limits on Federal Actions Against Companies" — one would think that companies can now run rampant without fear of federal legal repercussions. That's nonsense.


While traditionalists surely looked quizzically at the contemporary portraits that Barack and Michelle Obama commissioned for display in the National Portrait Gallery, one could count on The Washington Post and The New York Times to explain how wonderfully revolutionary the Obamas were to promote African-American painters to overturn the "bland propriety" of white traditions. 


The New York Times is using the Winter Olympics to hand North Korea’s gulag nation a public relations victory over Vice President Mike Pence, in the smiling form of the dictator’s influential sister: “Kim Jong-un’s Sister Turns on the Charm, Taking Pence’s Spotlight.” The reporters delighted in using Pence as a stooge stand-in for the loathed President Trump.


The 2018 Winter Olympics were in full swing and Kim Yo-jong, the sister of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un and head of their Propaganda and Agitation Department, had bizarrely become a liberal media darling. Despite the fact her job entailed censorship and glorifying public executions, numerous outlets had touted her for “stealing the show,” winning “diplomatic gold,” being the “Ivanka Trump of North Korea,” and hyping the extremely creepy North Korean cheerleading corp.