The New York Times' Gardiner Harris came up with a Trump-centric spin on an annual report about religious persecution worldwide, which this year focused on the terrorists of ISIS, in his Wednesday report “Islamic State Criticized As Persecutor In U.S. Report.” The text box: “Singling out ISIS in a study of threats to religious freedom.” Harris had some other threats in mind: The Trump administration, for one, both for attacks on Muslims and for failing to bring more of them in as refugees.


The media don’t just make the news, they frame it. Journalists did it this week, pushing business CEOs to quit President Donald Trump’s American Manufacturing Council. After one CEO resigned in response to Trump’s comments on the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, the media urged others to follow. The fallout resulted in Trump shutting down the group entirely.

Merck CEO Ken Frazier decided to leave the council after Trump’s comments on violence between white supremacists and counter protesters which included Antifa. Antifa are “anti-fascists” who show up to protest hateful speech and try to shut it down and have demonstrated willingness to use violence to accomplish those goals, according to CNN.


Liam Stack pulled himself off his anti-Trump Twitter feed long enough to file “Alt-Right, Alt-Left, Antifa, Cuck: A Brief Glossary of Extremist Terminology” for Wednesday’s New York Times, while his colleague Linda Qiu assured us that “anti-fascist” Antifa, the bat-wielding, window-smashing black bloc, are not actually domestic terrorists. Both stories soft-pedaled the violence emanating from Antifa.


Dear liberals: if Donald Trump uses a word you aren’t familiar with, that doesn’t mean it’s a fake word. After the President mentioned the alt-left yesterday in a press conference, the New York Times ran a story that claimed, “Researchers who study extremist groups in the United States say there is no such thing as the “alt-left.”


The mainstream media slams at President Donald Trump came in fast and furious on the heels of his August 15  press conference in which he again talked about violence at Charlottesville, Virginia this past weekend. Among the biggest critics was the New York Times which seemed to be upset with Trump blaming "both sides," the white nationalists and Antifa for the violence. Here is a bit of their criticism which you can see in their title, Trump Defends Initial Remarks on Charlottesville; Again Blames ‘Both Sides’:


New York Times reporter Jeremy Peters’ story on President Trump’s controversial response to the racist violence and killing in Charlottesville was posted online Tuesday: “Theories Abound Over Meaning of Trump’s ‘Many Sides’ Remark.” Peters did talk to some conservative media and was thus able to provide some useful countervailing facts about left-wing protester violence from the likes of the window-smashing, bat-wielding “anti-fascist” movement Antifa.


Get it? The vile racists who promoted violence in Charlottesvile, Virginia over the weekend, groups that include the KKK and Nazis, are part of the “far right” and “hard line conservatives.” That’s according to the New York Times in a front page story on Tuesday. Including the headline, the paper used the phrase “far right” or “conservative” six times to connect racist thugs to the political right. 


Since early April, the New York Times has presented a weekly "Red Century" series of op-eds dedicated to "Exploring the history and legacy of Communism, 100 years after the Russian Revolution" in 1917. The competition for the worst "communism wasn't all that bad" entry was pretty close until Saturday (seen in Sunday's print edition), when Kristen R. Ghodsee, a University of Pennsylvania professor of Russian and East European studies, told readers that "Women Had Better Sex Under Socialism," and deigned to tell us why.


Everyone expected the liberal media to hound President Trump to denounce his "base" of white supremacists and neo-Nazis specifically after the vehicular homicide in Charlottesville on Saturday, and once other Republicans showed how it was done, the media pressure intensified. But it takes a special kind of liberal-media jerk to denounce the actual Republican Nazi-denouncers as just positioning for the 2020 campaign. Meet New York Times reporter Eric Lipton.


The panel of Morning Joe erupted with outrage Monday morning over President Trump’s response to the Charlottesville rally. Willie Geist noted a “pattern” being at work, stating, “There's always this beat, this pause, this wink and he did it again on Saturday where it happened on many sides.” New York Times reporter Yamiche Alcindor agreed as she noted her own experiences in encountering pro-Trump white nationalists at the 2016 RNC convention. The criticism crescendoed, however, with Donny Deutsch, who denounced Trump as a “pathetic, sniveling man” before screaming, “No, he is a racist. He is a racist! Can we just say it once and for all?”   


Illegal immigrants (or rather, “undocumented immigrants”) remain safe under the rhetorical protection of the New York Times, if not the legal protection of American law. The top of Sunday’s Times front page featured a 3,000-word sympathetic tale, complete with huge photos, of an illegal immigrant family in Hampton, Iowa, choosing to self-deport after the husband was arrested. Reporter Jack Healy unfolded his long tale under the headline “Loving and Leaving America -- Stay, Hide, ‘Self-Deport’? Facing Hard Choices in the Heartland.”


On Thursday, a federal court judge in New York made what Eriq Gardner at the Hollywood Reporter called an "unusual move" in Sarah Palin's libel lawsuit against the New York Times. It is indeed extraordinarily unusual, and would appear not to bode well for the Times — which likely explains why the paper's colleagues in the establishment press are, for the most part, either not reporting it at all or inadequately reporting it.