Yes, that headline is real. In covering the effort by over 350 newspapers to collude against President Trump, Wednesday’s Hardball featured MSNBC host Chris Matthews alluding to Thomas Paine’s Common Sense and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin in the segment promoting the anti-Trump collusion campaign started by The Boston Globe.



CBS Late Show host Stephen Colbert recently was interviewed by New York Times’ culture writer Sopan Deb for the paper’s “TimesTalks” before a live audience August 13. In the hour long interview posted on YouTube, Deb questions the process of making an episode of The Late Show, what Colbert felt on election night in 2016, and how he sees his influence is during the Trump Administration and in the future. The comedian turned critic revealed his horror at learning that Trump had won, and regret at his star-laden show he had to scrap because Clinton lost.



Under the pretense of journalism, reporter Maggie Astor provided some public relations with the valuable New York Times-imprimatur for the children’s crusade for gun control (and a laundry list of made-up left-wing issues like “systems of oppression”) in Thursday’s lead National story, “Speakers, Students, Activists, Survivors – On the road with teenagers from the March for Our Lives.”



The real life New York Times "Sweet Spot" advice column provided more comedy than any parody of it could ever yield. In fact if you read the August 14 "How Can I Cure My White Guilt?" advice column without knowing it was not a parody, you would probably think it was. What provides the humor is not only the guilt provided by "Whitey" who is overly obsessed with "white privilege" but the SJW earnestness of those dispensing advice to him chock full of liberal platitudes.



Capping off a lengthy panel discussion on Wednesday’s MSNBC Live With Katy Tur touting former Trump White House staffer Omarosa Maniguault Newman’s attacks on the administration in her new tell-all book, New York Times Political Reporter Nick Confessore referenced iconic movie villains to describe the public feud.



Indulging in obvious identify politics in Wednesday’s New York Times, reporter Elizabeth Dias celebrated Rashida Tlaib’s Democratic primary victory in Detroit right along with her supporters in “Candidate’s Palestinian Heritage Infuses Sense of Community in Detroit.” Already, her story offers a remarkable counterpoint to anti-Muslim policy and sentiment rising around the country, and especially to President Trump, who has banned travel from several majority-Muslim countries....Ms. Tlaib, 42, represents a new addition to the mosaic of American politics."



The lead National Section story in Monday’s New York Times found the paper once again trying to make campaign finance reform a winning issue for the Democrats, in “Tired of Money in Politics, Some Democrats Think Small -- More candidates are spurning PAC’s, relying instead on individual donors, and voters are responding.”



A long article in the New York Times Sunday Styles, “Civility and Culture Wars In an Iowa Gun Town – When neighbors disagree but a major voice remains silent.” Jacqui Shine left big hints that Iowans are just too nice to properly confront the NRA board chairman in their midst, “Pete Brownell, a well-known and well-liked local philanthropist....He is also the third-generation C.E.O. of Brownells, a major firearms company whose headquarters are here....His public remarks have been unsurprising in the national conversation, but also strike some as unneighborly."



The New York Times is trying its best to find dirt on President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, filing an odd public information request with his wife’s employer. And in 2005 they tried to access sealed private records involving then-Bush-nominee John Roberts. Even the paper's commenters weren't convinced of the paper's fairness and balance, wondering where that investigative zeal was when it came to Democratic Supreme Court nominees..



The New York Times hired Sarah Jeong to write about technology as a member of the paper’s editorial board. Hours later came revelations from Jeong’s obsessively anti-white and anti-police ravings on Twitter, and a subsequent defense of Jeong’s hiring from the paper. Yet none of that recent controversy penetrated into “Inside the Struggle at Twitter Over What Warrants a Ban,” regarding the deplatforming of conspiracy-mongering Alex Jones. In fact, the story shows the paper doubling down on its double standards: Do as we say, not as we do.



I am offended at the Newseum’s T-shirt. Take a look at the label of this t-shirt at the Newseum's gift shop being offered for sale. It is described thusly: “Ladies Alternative Facts Tee.” On the shirt itself it defines “Alternative Fact” as follows: 1. A false statement delivered with deliberate intent to mislead or to deceive. Synonym: lie, prevarication, untruth.

 



Hope springs eternal for Democrats in the pages of the New York Times. Thursday’s lead story by Alexander Burns and Jonathan Martin provided Democratic predictions for winning the House in the November elections: “Clarity in Election Fog: Fall Holds Peril for G.O.P.” The reporters made hay over GOP struggles, and again exploited criminal charges faced by Rep. Chris Collins to make a pro-Democratic prediction. Other stories alternately pushed female candidates and mocked them, depending on party label.