Wednesday’s signed lead editorial by Mara Gay of the New York Times editorial board attacked a conservative news rival the New York Post while demading that New York Democrats to buck up on the newly instigated "bail reform," despite the street violence that has already resulted from the controversial policy: “Democrats Run From Their Own Shadows.”  Gay flirted with blaming victims of violent crime for the movement, in this case Hasidic and Orthodox Jews as well as its more conservative tabloid rival the New York Post.



The New York Times published an op-ed today rather explicitly calling for the dismissal of The View panelist Meghan McCain. The headline was "‘The View’ Has a Meghan McCain Problem: The daytime co-hosts’ heated bipartisan debates are played down as disagreement among friends. But the strain for 'civility' is tiring."



The New York Times continues to ruin nights at the movies.Brooks Barnes and Nicole Sperling lamented the Academy Awards film nominations: “The Oscar Leaders, And the Overlooked – With 11, ‘Joker’ scores the most  nominations.” “The Irishman,” “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood” and “1917” each received 10 nominations. Black actors and actresses were largely overlooked.” Don’t forget women either! The Times certainly didn’t. (It won’t shut up about it.) Also, Kyle Buchanan’s “Carpetbagger” column on Oscar nominations, “The Big Surprises And Glaring Snubs,” made a radical case for quotas.



One of the internet’s foremost tech journalists blasted the owner of Fox News and The Wall Street Journal as the “largest menace to the modern world.” Recode co-founder and New York Times contributor Kara Swisher wrote in a tweet on Jan. 8, 2020, “If you had to pick one person who has been the largest menace in the modern world, spreading hate and disinformation that has disastrous results everywhere he goes, Rupert Murdoch or, as I like to call him, Uncle Satan, would top the list.”



Big news on the...textbook front? The front page of Monday’s New York Times was dominated by the results of education reporter Dana Goldstein’s examination of differences between history textbooks approved for California students, and those given to students in Texas: “Two States. Eight Textbooks. Two American Stories.”  This paragraph was unintentionally revealing of the paper’s Bernie Sanders-style economics bias and obsession with “inequality”: "California’s curriculum materials, by contrast, sometimes read like a brief from a Bernie Sanders rally. 'The yawning gap between the haves and have-nots and what is to be done about it is one of the great questions of this time,' says the state’s 2016 social studies framework."



Liberal billionaire and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg may have just one-upped fellow liberal billionaire Tom Steyer in anti-Trump spending by being willing to burn through an unheard-of amount of money to defeat President Donald Trump.



Appearing on MSNBC Live With Ali Velshi Monday afternoon, New York Times foreign correspondent Rukmini Callimachi slammed the United States as a country that takes action “outside the law,” while praising Iran for supposedly showing “more restraint” amid tensions in the Middle East. 



David Marchese, staff writer and “Talk” columnist for the New York Times Magazine, got some things off his chest during a challenging interview with black Republican congressman Rep. Will Hurd of Texas. He clearly used the interview as his own personal anti-GOP gripe session: "Don’t you think that, for example, the Republican Party’s being the party generally in favor of stricter voter-ID laws -- laws that have a disproportionately negative effect on communities of color -- is as much a hindrance to the party’s ability to attract voters from those same communities as messaging?"



While journalists live in their own media echo chamber most of the time, occasionally they’ll get a healthy dose of reality when they share their self-aggrandizing opinions on social media. That happened to New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman this past weekend when she whined about President Trump defending Iranian journalists against their totalitarian government.



Former New York Times editorial board member Adam Cohen, who once served as lawyer for the discredited Southern Poverty Law Center, reviewed Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus’s book on the Brett Kavanaugh nomination. (The book’s title gives the slant away: “Supreme Ambition -- Brett Kavanaugh and the Conservative Takeover.”) Cohen’s review unloaded a cheap shot in the text box: “‘If you had asked me who was the biggest drinker in our class I would have said Brett,” one classmate said.” Anonymous hearsay? Now there’s some hard evidence for you. Down the memory hole: Any mention of the paper’s own botched, biased Kavanaugh investigation.



Political reporter Jeremy Peters committed “strange new respect” for the religious left on the front of Saturday’s New York Times in “Why Buttigieg Is Putting Faith In the Spotlight.” Peters introduced Democratic candidate Pete Buttigieg in the midst of doing his “standard riff on the role of faith in politics” in which he “castigated Republicans for using religion as a wedge to divide Americans." Peters admitted some voters find the “Rhodes scholar, military veteran and polyglot” a bit “precocious and lacking in empathy,” then spoke to a “civil rights activist” to lament the Democratic Party ceding faith issues. And who was this “civil rights activist”? Al Sharpton.



New York Times  "conservative" columnist David Brooks blames Trump for making liberals look stupid. Something that really takes no effort.