The Hollywood bandwagon against pro-life initiatives piles on more bodies as Netflix throws itself into the mix. Cluelessly shouting, “Wait, me too!” Netflix’s chief content officer Ted Sarandos threatened to pull productions out of Georgia in a statement made to Variety, following the oh-so-stunning and brave examples of David Simon, Kristin Wiig, and Busy Phillips.



Netflix’s The Society is the streaming site’s latest foray into misguided teen drama. Between shows like Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, Insatiable, and 13 Reasons Why, it’s safe to say that Netflix has no standards for teen viewers. While The Society is thankfully less gruesome, it sadly falls in line with the other dreadful examples in terms of language, sex, and politics.



April has come and gone with no shortage of absolute hatred and contempt from media progressives. Entertainment programming from major networks, cable TV and popular streaming services have delivered another 40 deranged anti-Trump/conservative scenes for impressionable viewers, providing God-fearing viewers another valid reason to grab those torches and pitchforks. Much of this month’s material is simply monstrous.



Well, we finally have the opportunity to see what the Obamas have up their media mogul sleeves. After announcing a multi-million dollar Netflix deal, the former first couple have spilled the beans on their new streaming content, offering diehard Obama fans several options for clinging to the “Hope” and “Change” social justice dream from the comfort of their living rooms.



In this day and age, parents have to be extra cautious about what their kids watch as not all cartoons are actually kid appropriate. Fortunately, there are some innocent shows out there, but then there are shows that aren’t as innocent as they seem. One such show, She-Ra and the Princesses of Power, proved to fall in the latter category when their second season debuted on Netflix on April 26.



In the era of feminism and #MeToo, Netflix’s newest short form show Bonding paints masculinity as constricting, states that if men got their periods then abortions would be everywhere and claims that only Republicans want to keep bathrooms separated by gender. And that’s just the beginning.



Post-apocalyptic movies have plenty in common. The survivors feast on dwindling food supplies. Basic necessities like clean water, medicine and electricity are suddenly in short supply. And the force that caused the disaster, be it man-made or technologically driven, isn’t the only thing to fear.



The holiest time of the year doesn't provide a break for Christians from Hollywood's anti-religious bias on TV. If anything, it makes it worse.



Netflix’s No Good Nick tells the story of Nick (Siena Agudong) who catfishes an unsuspecting family, the Thompsons, into thinking she’s family. Add in the Thompsons' daughter, the socially conscious Molly (Lauren Lindsey Donzis), and it gets a whole lot weirder.



Netfilix released a new show on April 12, Special, that is supposedly a comedy, but is really a woke double whammy about a disabled gay man trying to make his way in the workplace. As if that wasn't enough, they sprinkle in more left-wing content along the way. Five minutes into the first episode, "Cerebral LOLzy," we find out that one of the main characters supposedly had an orgasm during an abortion.



A drama based on the supernatural world of witches and warlocks aimed at teens and young adults is probably not the best place to look for clean, wholesome fun, especially if the venue is Netflix. There are three specific topics brought into Part Two of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina that will cause concern for conservative parents.



A new Netflix offering, The Highwaymen, is the story of the murderous bank-robber duo Bonnie and Clyde, with a twist: The tale is told from the other side. It’s advertised as “the untold true story of the legendary detectives who brought down Bonnie and Clyde,” with the lawmen played by Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson. It debuted on Netflix last week, and the film put New York Times movie critic A.O. Scott in a grumpy and sour mood – a disposition he projects upon the law-and-order audience he assumes is the movie’s audience. His review led off with moral preening and political disapproval.