Netfilix released a new show on April 12, Special, that is supposedly a comedy, but is really a woke double whammy about a disabled gay man trying to make his way in the workplace. As if that wasn't enough, they sprinkle in more left-wing content along the way. Five minutes into the first episode, "Cerebral LOLzy," we find out that one of the main characters supposedly had an orgasm during an abortion.



A drama based on the supernatural world of witches and warlocks aimed at teens and young adults is probably not the best place to look for clean, wholesome fun, especially if the venue is Netflix. There are three specific topics brought into Part Two of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina that will cause concern for conservative parents.



A new Netflix offering, The Highwaymen, is the story of the murderous bank-robber duo Bonnie and Clyde, with a twist: The tale is told from the other side. It’s advertised as “the untold true story of the legendary detectives who brought down Bonnie and Clyde,” with the lawmen played by Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson. It debuted on Netflix last week, and the film put New York Times movie critic A.O. Scott in a grumpy and sour mood – a disposition he projects upon the law-and-order audience he assumes is the movie’s audience. His review led off with moral preening and political disapproval.



Equal Pay Day, supposedly how far into the year women must work to earn the same amount men made the previous year, fell on April 2 this year (8 days earlier than last year) and of course Hollywood was all over it.



Netflix's new comedyTurn Up Charlie is a strange mix of anti-liberal messages being delivered through the story and pro-liberal messages being said in the actual dialogue. Ultimately, it is about how the screwed-up entertainment industry can make people forget their priorities and the repercussions it has on a family, a decidedly anti-liberal point of view. However, the characters occasionally spout the kinds of things liberals who have never even met a Republican would say - like that their Republican parents used to shoot animals in the front yard.



On March 15, Netflix dropped a dark new animated sci-fy anthology series called Love, Death + Robots. The episodes boast many styles and animation teams across many different countries, but the one thing they have in common is a love of outrageously inappropriate material. Everything from violence to language to sex is up-close and personal in all the wrong ways. Looks like Netflix is quickly becoming the sex hub of streaming services.



Secret City: Under the Eagle, the second season of Netflix's Australian political drama released March 6, portrayed Americans as lying to their allies, droning their friends, and not caring if innocent people are hurt or killed in the process. This season finds reporter Harriet Dunkley (Anna Torv) investigating a cover up in the Australian government. When an explosion at a suburban home kills four people, it is initially blamed on a gas leak, then on the family's teenaged son, who survived. The truth, as it turns out, is far more sinister and, of course, the Americans are involved.



There were times when watching the new Netflix teen fantasy series The Order I genuinely wondered if they were intending for the show to sound satirical. In the first half of the first episode, viewers were treated to a reference to "one percenter parasites," new students at Belgrave College, where the show takes place, were directed to "male, female, and non-binary bathrooms" and given "how not to rape" pamphlets, and former president George W. Bush was compared to Mussolini. Unfortunately, I think this is the state of young adult content in 2019.



For reasons I don’t quite understand, Netflix has brought back its reboot of liberal Norman Lear's One Day at a Time for a third season. It began airing February 8 and the central theme of the teenage daughter’s lesbian sexuality is in your face from the very first episode. And, of course, there are a few random swipes at President Trump, too, throughout the thirteen episodes.



Netflix’s Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt has come to an end. The last six episodes of Season Four were released on January 25. There is a last shot at President Trump included in the usual zany madcap episodes, though, and clearly, the writers wanted to mock his wealth and physical health. And, oh yeah, Trump's going to Hell. How brave of them.



Netflix and Marvel’s The Punisher has returned for a second season despite a massive purge of Marvel shows in the previous year. The demand for ultra-violence and pseudo-politics were apparently enough to prevent its cancellation, so far. Rest assured, all of that returns for another thirteen episodes.



Netflix’s newest series Sex Education, takes place at a sex obsessed British high school where Otis (Asa Butterfield) and Maeve (Emma Mackey) team together to give twisted sex advice to fellow teens. No wonder that abortion is the featured topic in one of the first few episodes.