On March 15, Netflix dropped a dark new animated sci-fy anthology series called Love, Death + Robots. The episodes boast many styles and animation teams across many different countries, but the one thing they have in common is a love of outrageously inappropriate material. Everything from violence to language to sex is up-close and personal in all the wrong ways. Looks like Netflix is quickly becoming the sex hub of streaming services.



Secret City: Under the Eagle, the second season of Netflix's Australian political drama released March 6, portrayed Americans as lying to their allies, droning their friends, and not caring if innocent people are hurt or killed in the process. This season finds reporter Harriet Dunkley (Anna Torv) investigating a cover up in the Australian government. When an explosion at a suburban home kills four people, it is initially blamed on a gas leak, then on the family's teenaged son, who survived. The truth, as it turns out, is far more sinister and, of course, the Americans are involved.



There were times when watching the new Netflix teen fantasy series The Order I genuinely wondered if they were intending for the show to sound satirical. In the first half of the first episode, viewers were treated to a reference to "one percenter parasites," new students at Belgrave College, where the show takes place, were directed to "male, female, and non-binary bathrooms" and given "how not to rape" pamphlets, and former president George W. Bush was compared to Mussolini. Unfortunately, I think this is the state of young adult content in 2019.



For reasons I don’t quite understand, Netflix has brought back its reboot of liberal Norman Lear's One Day at a Time for a third season. It began airing February 8 and the central theme of the teenage daughter’s lesbian sexuality is in your face from the very first episode. And, of course, there are a few random swipes at President Trump, too, throughout the thirteen episodes.



Netflix’s Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt has come to an end. The last six episodes of Season Four were released on January 25. There is a last shot at President Trump included in the usual zany madcap episodes, though, and clearly, the writers wanted to mock his wealth and physical health. And, oh yeah, Trump's going to Hell. How brave of them.



Netflix and Marvel’s The Punisher has returned for a second season despite a massive purge of Marvel shows in the previous year. The demand for ultra-violence and pseudo-politics were apparently enough to prevent its cancellation, so far. Rest assured, all of that returns for another thirteen episodes.



Netflix’s newest series Sex Education, takes place at a sex obsessed British high school where Otis (Asa Butterfield) and Maeve (Emma Mackey) team together to give twisted sex advice to fellow teens. No wonder that abortion is the featured topic in one of the first few episodes.



On Morning Joe, Donny Deutsch describes President Trump as "pathetic" and "defanged," going from being a "malignant cancer" to a "benign cancer." And so it is for the cast of Morning Joe. No matter how they might have denounced President Trump the day before, as the sun rises they are forced to begin yet again their labor of trying to take Trump down. 



Netflix released season 3 of the self-proclaimed “raunchy” comedy F is for Family on November 30 and after watching all ten episodes, I can honestly say that raunchy is an understatement. Ideally, the show should be titled F is for FBI since its creators should be investigated for their graphic depiction of animated child porn.



The Ranch is back on Netflix with the second half of season six and, while we used to be able to count on them to represent conservatives in the "flyover" states, they just couldn't resist getting in a dig at President Trump this time around. 



In a little over a month, we’ve seen HBO hire an “intimacy coordinator” to ensure that scenes of graphic sex and abuse can go on camera uninhibited, and subsequently saw Elevation Pictures release a film whose heroine unabashedly journals about the “sugar baby” lifestyle. If it seems like the opposite of #MeToo’s grand vision is what is materializing on screen, we’re not done yet.



Have you been longing for a cartoon about drag queen superheroes? Nor was I, but Netflix has given us one anyway. It's Super Drags, which the streaming service describes as "three gay co-workers lead double lives as drag queen superheroes, saving the LGBTQ community from evil nemeses." Throughout the series, there is one nemesis who remains constant and, of course, he is religious. And looks like Hitler.