NBC’s pro-LGBT propaganda arm, “NBC OUT,” recently published a piece about proposed “anti-LGBT bills” that will supposedly undermine “civil rights.” The article began with the story of “married” homosexual men who “became foster parents to two children, both under the age of 2.” 



The mounting archive of WikiLeaks emails between Hillary Clinton and her staff continues to reveal the Democratic presidential candidate’s special relationship with members of the liberal news media. Not only did she hold an off the record dinner with “influential reporters, anchors, and editors” just before officially launching her presidential bid, but reporters also asked for interviews promising the kind “she wants” or submitting copy for pre-approval before publishing it.



In a post headlined “To See Mike Pence as ‘Normal’ Is to Grade on a Generous Curve,” Steve Benen, who's also the primary blogger for the TRMS website, sought to demolish the idea that Tuesday night’s vice presidential debate will feature what Politico called “two conventional pols.” “As a matter of tone and temperament, Mike Pence is hardly scary: the governor is a mild-mannered, soft-spoken Midwesterner,” wrote Benen. “But to shift one’s focus from tone to policy is to see one of the most extremist politicians to seek national office in over a generation.”



News of the evening terrorist truck attack in Nice, France first appeared at the Drudge report at 5:06 p.m. U.S. Eastern Time Thursday afternoon. By 5:28, Drudge was linking to an item noting that conducting a terrorist attack with a truck is something "that jihadist propaganda has suggested for several years."

Friday at 12:15 a.m. Eastern Time, hours after it was known that what had occurred was a terrorist attack, a tweet from the intrepid journalists (that's sarcasm, folks) at MSNBC.com told readers that the event was a "deadly truck crash."



"Advocates for abortion rights don’t get a lot of good news, but Wednesday brought some," MSNBC.com's Irin Carmon gleefully opened her March 30 story, "FDA move could radically transform abortion access."



Quite a few conservatives were incensed over the photo of President Obama and other officials, including John Kerry and at least one of Cuba’s many vice presidents, standing against the backdrop of a several-stories-tall steel relief mural of Che Guevara. Consequently, quite a few liberals told those conservatives, in effect, to get a life.

One of those liberals was Steve Benen, the primary blogger for the TRMS website. In a Monday post, Benen suggested that objectors to the photo are dead-enders who don’t or can’t understand that “the debate over U.S. policy towards Cuba has effectively been resolved.” He sniped, “The president’s critics haven’t had much success pointing to problems with the administration’s policy, but they’re apparently apoplectic about a photograph…Before your crazy uncle who watches Fox all day sends you an all-caps email, it’s worth taking a deep breath.”



Watch it happen like clockwork twice this year. Adjusting the clock for daylight savings? No. MSNBC's fear-mongering about voter ID laws, happening now in front of the North Carolina, Florida, and Ohio primaries and surely to repeat later this fall in front of the general election in those states.



Normally when liberal media folks find out a celebrity is a conservative Republican, they ignore the development or dismiss it as irrelevant. But Caitlyn, formerly Bruce, Jenner, is quite the different story, with the transgender former Olympic athlete coming out as a fan of *gasp* Ted Cruz.



Since the economy finally began consistently regaining jobs in early 2010, the establishment press has had a consistent, predictable and annoying reporting (and non-reporting) pattern.

It starts with the Friday morning jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics at or near the beginning of the month. Virtually without fail, it has spit out positive and sometimes even very positive seasonally adjusted increases in overall payroll employment (one small exception: the Census hiring season in mid-2010). Later that day, or in some cases a week later, but in either case in the late afternoon when most reporters are thinking about their weekends instead of their jobs, the USDA releases its report on enrollment in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), aka Food Stamps. If you didn't know that the economy was adding jobs, the Food Stamp figures would lead you to believe that it wasn't. Somehow, this is never news.



Hardly anyone would dispute the validity of the term “small-government conservative,” but “big-government liberal” is a horse of a different color, believes Steve Benen, a producer for MSNBC’s The Rachel Maddow Show. Benen claims that while right-wingers’ preference for small government is ideologically driven, “progressives” such as President Obama look at size-of-government issues in practical and quantifiable terms.

“I don’t know any progressives who gloat over increases in the federal payroll or the government share of GDP,” wrote Benen in a Tuesday post for the TRMS web site. “Progressives have things they want the government to do – like guaranteeing health care. Size per se doesn’t matter. But people on the right apparently can’t get that.”



MSNBC's Chris Hayes is usually right less often than a stopped clock, i.e., fewer than two times a day. But he might get lucky if by some miracle he's right about something else today because of the matter discussed in this post.

After the Obama administration announced that President Barack Obama will not attend Saturday's funeral for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, a staunch Catholic, Hayes tweeted that Obama should be there, and explained why he actually got something right for a change, i.e., he relied on his mother's advice (HT Twitchy via Instapundit):



It would appear that the New York Times and MSNBC, in focusing on Hillary Clinton's speaking fees, are, after many months of serving as virtual Clinton campaign mouthpieces, beginning to hedge their bets in the race for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination. This information has been available since last spring, but only now is it being seen as geuinely troubling. Why wasn't seen as a big problem when it was first revealed?

In May of last year, Times reporters Maggie Habermann and Stephen Eder conceded that the speaking fees charged by Mrs. Clinton and her husband Bill, which have averaged roughly $250,000, "could create challenges for the former secretary of state as she tries to cast herself as a champion of everyday Americans in an era of income inequality." My, how the tone has changed now that Mrs. Clinton's coronation has become less than seemingly certain.