On Wednesday, MSNBC’s AM Joy host and far-left charlatan Joy Reid found herself in hot water for claiming (thanks to the liberal site RawStory.com) that National Review’s David French should be ashamed of himself for penning a story excusing the prospect of nuclear war because “it will only kill Democrats and minorities.” Reid eventually offered a response that can best be referred to as milk toast, appearing to pin the blame on RawStory.com.



Last week, Wisconsin's Attorney General issued a report recommending contempt charges against six former workers at the state's now-defunct Government Accountability Board and three employees in the Milwaukee County prosecutor's office for their involvement in or knowledge of illegal and criminal leaks of GAB documents relating to what has become known as the "John Doe" investigation of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker. The Associated Press's Scott Bauer, whose animosity towards Walker and Republicans has been obvious for least seven years, has been busy downplaying the matter as just another "partisan" dispute while making false claims about the nature of the investigation and the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling which halted it.

 



New York Times reporter Julie Hirschfeld Davis filed the paper’s latest passionate defense of an amnesty plan for young (and not-so-young) illegals -- Deferred Action for Child Arrivals, or DACA -- in Saturday’s edition. Warning that Trump risked appearing "particularly hardhearted," (even more than usual?) Davis shamelessly used Hurricane Harvey as a political weapon to prop up the initiative put in place by President Obama in 2012, after Congress failed to pass the DREAM Act, in “Storm Complicates a Decision on Whether to Keep ‘Dreamers’ Program.”



The establishment press and the left began to build a template after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the U.S. Their argument, which eventually gained traction with protest movements during the Iraq War, claimed that any serious attempt to kill, imprison, expel, or otherwise punish terrorists would only help the enemy recruit more terrorists. A CNN reporter and an opinion writer are now claiming that an equivalent of this bogus argument should apply to the attempt to rid the nation of the scourge of the MS-13 gang.



Next Sunday’s New York Times Sunday Magazine will feature a long essay by left-wing historian Rick Perlstein: “I Thought I Understood the American Right. Trump Proved Me Wrong.” Approach with caution, warn two prominent conservative writers. National Review's Jonah Goldberg warns: “Perlstein’s essay offers a really good insight into how the Times has jettisoned so much credibility in the age of Trump.”



How is Donald Trump “not a normal Republican”? Let New York magazine’s Jonathan Chait count the ways. Trump is “crudely ethno-nationalist,” wrote Chait in a Tuesday post, and he’s “personally ignorant and undisciplined in a manner that sets him apart not only from traditional Republicans but most human adults.” That’s pretty much it for Trump’s deviations from orthodoxy, according to Chait, who thinks current White House economic and fiscal proposals are “perfectly orthodox” by party standards, notwithstanding blasts at them from GOP-aligned sources such as National Review.



People will believe silly things when it fits their ideological preconceptions. Even when they have been debunked and are contradicted by first-hand information and news reports. A handful of mostly left-leaning publications repeated a British tabloid’s wild claim that Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch started a “fascism forever club” in high school. This bizarre smear of Gorsuch was debunked by Snopes.  



In his must-read Politico Magazine column published on Tuesday, National Review editor Rich Lowry doled out some advice for hyperventilating journalists over President-elect Trump blasting their profession (like this week when BuzzFeed News published the salacious dossier). 



Wednesday afternoon, the Associated Press's Mary Clare Jalonick served as Democratic Party Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer's mouthpiece, relaying his promise to "oppose with everything we have" any Supreme Court nominee who isn't fit the Senator's definition of "mainstream."



In his "Morning Jolt" e-mail newsletter on Wednesday, National Review’s Jim Geraghty tore into an article comparing Harry Reid to Yoda. Jason Zengerle, a writer for Politico's magazine, wrote a gushy profile of Reid for New York magazine that included this passage: "Reid is as stern and blunt as ever, and the combined effect of his mental and physical condition has given him a Yoda-ish quality."



Donald Trump is a visceral and emotional conservative, not a philosophical conservative, but that’s good enough for government work, suggests New York blogger Chait. The main aim of Chait’s Thursday post was to slap down the argument from some righty pundits that candidate Trump was, as Chait paraphrased it, “a non-ideological figure, or even a progressive…who chose the Republican Party for no particular reason, and who shares none of its salient characteristics.” Chait indicated that in general, conservatives’ distaste for the president-elect is found among journalists and intellectuals, while “activists” have worldviews similar to Trump’s.



Washington Post local columnist Petula Dvorak waded into the ginned-up fake news debate in her Tuesday column as she compared the false and unsubstantiated Pizzagate story to the “doctored” and “gotcha” videos that spawned the Planned Parenthood scandal and Sarah Palin causing then-Congresswoman Gabby Giffords to be shot in 2011 (even though the first case was real and the second was thoroughly debunked).