CNN's Chris Cuomo again acted as a liberal activist on Wednesday's New Day during a panel discussion on Donald Trump's controversial plan to ban Muslim immigration to the U.S. Cuomo asserted that it was the Republican presidential candidates' "moment to step up and say how they are different on this particular issue," because, in his view, "Republicans are reaping what they've sown. You know, they went heavy on opposition, heavy on negativity...And now, you have somebody who really embodies that in Donald Trump."



If we gave out an award for laugh-out-loud absurd tweet of the day, this would likely be it for March 18.



In dual columns Tuesday and Wednesday, National Journal columnist Ron Fourier tore into Hillary Clinton and her email scandal, declaring her to be “[a] pay-phone candidate in an iPhone world” and having utterly failed to answer numerous questions as to why “she seized control of documents that were supposed to be on a government server.”



In a Tuesday article for National Journal, senior political columnist Ron Fournier blasted Hillary Clinton over the breaking email scandal and even suggested she give up her presidential ambitions: "Perhaps Hillary Rodham Clinton shouldn't run for president....Because she doesn't seem ready for 2016. Like a blast of wintry air in July, the worst of 1990s-style politics is intruding on what needs to be a new millennium campaign: Transparent, inspirational, innovative, and beyond ethical reproach."



For the second time in just over a week, CNN aired a misleading on-screen graphic. On Wednesday's The Lead With Jake Tapper, during live coverage of President Obama's speech to a White House summit on "countering violent extremism," a lower third chyron stated, "Obama: Must 'Stigmatize' Muslim Community."



In speech at the National Press Club on Tuesday, New York’s senior Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer expressed regret over how Democrats handled their large majorities following the 2008 election in passing ObamaCare when they should have focused first on economic issues to address the recession.

Since then, the remarks have received no coverage from any of the “big three” in ABC, CBS, and NBC on either their respective morning or evening newscasts in a situation that undoubtedly would not be the case if a Republican Senator had expressed doubts about an initiative by a Republican-controlled Congress and White House.



Two cheers — and two cheers only — for the National Journal's Ron Fournier.

On Fox News's Special Report with Bret Baier last night, the former Associated Press Washington Bureau chief observed that the Jonathan Gruber videos about how the Affordable Care Act was dishonestly written and promoted, as well as President Barack Obama's reaction to those revelations, demonstrate that he (Obama) "has destroyed the credibility of his administration, himself, and government itself." Fine. But then, imitating the naive lover who won't give up despite constant betrayal in the hit song "I Can't Let Go," Fournier stated that he "would like to see this bill work." 



Ed Morrissey at Hot Air ably announced that liberal reporters and analysts are breaking out the latest spin – that victory will be terrible for Republicans. I’d call it the Mary Tillotson special: after the GOP took the house in 1994, CNN’s Tillotson suggested this 52-seat landslide was bad news for 1996.

Morrissey calls it “the media’s Sour Grapes Index, in which analysts posit that a big win is really a loss, or that a loss is really a big win.” Alexander Bolton at The Hill offers the classic take, “Civil war looms for the GOP":



So, Senator, will you agree to debate your opponent during the campaign?

Hey, let me tell you about this sweet corn. It is so delicious that you can't eat just one ear. So sweet and tasty that I eat them by the dozen. And since I still have to run out the clock until election day, let's switch gears to ponder on the issue of chocolate chip cookies. You can buy them by the bucket and float them in bottomless glasses of ice cold milk...



“Americans want our next president to be a woman, hey babe here’s lookin’ at you Senator Elizabeth Warren,” were the words sung in a new video put out by the Ready for Warren website following the Massachusetts Democrat's keynote address at the liberal Netroots Convention in Detroit on Friday afternoon.

A former Obama staffer launched a “Ready for Warren” website and took to the liberal activist conference Netroots this week passing out hats, signs, and stickers touting “Elizabeth Warren for President.” Warren delivered the keynote speech at the event this afternoon and the Ready for Warren folks released a “folk music video” urging the Senator to run.



Hillary Clinton is not as complex as the universe, but she's Big and Important enough for Peter Beinart to call his 4,600-word National Journal piece on her hypothetical presidency "A Unified Theory of Hillary" and appear to mean it (mostly) seriously.

The article deals more with Hillary's personality than with her ideology (for what it's worth, Beinart classifies Hillary, along with Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, as moderate liberals). Beinart lauds her "passion for public policy," her "formidable analytical ability," and her "[s]ingle-mindedness," but contends that last quality also is her "greatest flaw," pointing to how she suffered major setbacks on health-care reform and, eventually, the Iraq war because she did not, and perhaps could not, adjust to political realities.



In a Monday National Journal column about how many Democrats are allegedly saying they have "quit" on Obama — claims I find quite hollow, given that no one asserting this has yet had the guts to go on the record — Ron Fournier quotes "a senior White House official" with a head-shaking take on the Veterans Administration scandal.

Specifically, "Questioning why the Veterans Affairs Department hadn't been overhauled months ago as promised by Obama (actually that was seven years ago, plus six other times, Ron — Ed.), a senior White House official conceded privately to me, 'We don't do the small stuff well. And the small stuff is the important stuff.'" If the VA is "small," what in the world is big? And for that matter, what have these people done well, big or small? I suspect that the rest of the press, and Fournier himself, would be absolutely livid if they became aware of such an ignorant statement made by someone in a Republican or conservative administration.