If PC can make 100-year-old statues disappear, it certainly can erase rock n’ roll songs. This summer’s deluxe re-issue of rock band Guns N’ Roses’ 1987 album, Appetite for Destruction, was packaged without an original song due to homophobic and racist content.



Though the left defends their own when they call women “c*nts,” heaven forbid if even a liberal newspaper should call a woman “big.” Twitter and the internet have gone insane over a July 22 review written by The New York Times critic Laura Collins-Hughs about the latest Broadway production of “Smokey Joe’s Cafe,” in which she happened to mention that one of the stars, Alysha Umphress, is “bigger than the other women on stage.” This apparently qualifies as fat-shaming.



CNN news anchor Jake Tapper is getting his Afghani war book turned into a Hollywood action flick with major tinseltown leading men signing on for the action. On Thursday, The Hollywood Reporter broke the news that several actors have been selected for the onscreen adaptation of The Outpost. The cast includes a few big names such as Orlando Bloom and Scott Eastwood, as well as up-and-coming Sharper Objects star, Taylor John Smith.

 


In the wake of the horrific shooting at Santa Fe High School in Texas, celebrities seized the opportunity to do the same old song and dance on gun control at the 2018 Billboard Music Awards on Sunday night, including one performer who prominently sported an anti-gun shirt on stage.



If Nickelodeon thought politicizing its annual Kids’ Choice Awards would draw viewership, the liberal tween-centered network was sadly mistaken. In fact, despite a slew of star power and a fun segment based on the critically-acclaimed Nintendo Switch game Super Mario Odyssey, the blatant and unnecessary March for Our Lives references looks to have turned kids and their parents away in droves.



Sunday night's 2018 iHeartRadio Awards went into the same old song and dance showing its love for liberal politics, especially gun control.



On Sunday, NPR host Michel Martin interviewed Maroon 5 keyboardist P.J. Morton on his solo record and a song that “caught my ear” called “Religion.” The lyrics included: “I don't think I like your religion. Don't always make the best decisions. Not saying you don't have good intentions. I know that you are only human.” Of course, this song was about evangelicals and Donald Trump, and somehow, Trump and his fans were comparable to religious backers of slavery.



It’s ironic how liberal celebrities preach tolerance and acceptance but apparently possess neither. After singer Lorde announced her decision to cancel her concert in Tel Aviv, Rabbi Shmuley Boteach and World Values Network took out an ad in the Washington Post to criticize her for her decision. While the ad went after Lorde, it also targeted the media in New Zealand, which influenced Lorde to make her decision. 



The Washington Post was a day late in whining about the lack of gun-control advocacy (or as they put it, “courage”) at the Country Music Association awards. Music writer Chris Richards wrote a “Critic’s Notebook” commentary headlined “A monolithic silence from top artists at CMA Awards.” Online, the headline was “Country music is becoming the soundtrack of a nonexistent, apolitical no-place.”



Washington Post music writer Emily Yahr was tapping her foot on Thursday...waiting for the country music industry to abandon its entertainment mission and end its shameful silence on gun control, after dozens of country music fans were murdered by shooter Stephen Paddock in Las Vegas: “Country music avoided politics this year. Then Las Vegas happened. Will anything change?”



In a recent Billboard magazine interview, country singer Miranda Lambert was given the opportunity to explain why she doesn’t use her music or the stage as a political platform.

Billboard’s Max Hendrickson reported “When I ask Lambert if she thinks that at this moment in history — with, among other things, this particular president in office — there is an opening for her to make the kind of issue-oriented songs [Loretta] Lynn became known for, Lambert is quick to dismiss the idea.”



While most celebrities are bemoaning our current political climate, music artist Joy Villa is proactively working to heal divided America through music. And her new hit single, ‘Make America Great Again,’ is doing exactly that.