In the wake of the horrific shooting at Santa Fe High School in Texas, celebrities seized the opportunity to do the same old song and dance on gun control at the 2018 Billboard Music Awards on Sunday night, including one performer who prominently sported an anti-gun shirt on stage.



If Nickelodeon thought politicizing its annual Kids’ Choice Awards would draw viewership, the liberal tween-centered network was sadly mistaken. In fact, despite a slew of star power and a fun segment based on the critically-acclaimed Nintendo Switch game Super Mario Odyssey, the blatant and unnecessary March for Our Lives references looks to have turned kids and their parents away in droves.



Sunday night's 2018 iHeartRadio Awards went into the same old song and dance showing its love for liberal politics, especially gun control.



On Sunday, NPR host Michel Martin interviewed Maroon 5 keyboardist P.J. Morton on his solo record and a song that “caught my ear” called “Religion.” The lyrics included: “I don't think I like your religion. Don't always make the best decisions. Not saying you don't have good intentions. I know that you are only human.” Of course, this song was about evangelicals and Donald Trump, and somehow, Trump and his fans were comparable to religious backers of slavery.



It’s ironic how liberal celebrities preach tolerance and acceptance but apparently possess neither. After singer Lorde announced her decision to cancel her concert in Tel Aviv, Rabbi Shmuley Boteach and World Values Network took out an ad in the Washington Post to criticize her for her decision. While the ad went after Lorde, it also targeted the media in New Zealand, which influenced Lorde to make her decision. 



The Washington Post was a day late in whining about the lack of gun-control advocacy (or as they put it, “courage”) at the Country Music Association awards. Music writer Chris Richards wrote a “Critic’s Notebook” commentary headlined “A monolithic silence from top artists at CMA Awards.” Online, the headline was “Country music is becoming the soundtrack of a nonexistent, apolitical no-place.”



Washington Post music writer Emily Yahr was tapping her foot on Thursday...waiting for the country music industry to abandon its entertainment mission and end its shameful silence on gun control, after dozens of country music fans were murdered by shooter Stephen Paddock in Las Vegas: “Country music avoided politics this year. Then Las Vegas happened. Will anything change?”



In a recent Billboard magazine interview, country singer Miranda Lambert was given the opportunity to explain why she doesn’t use her music or the stage as a political platform.

Billboard’s Max Hendrickson reported “When I ask Lambert if she thinks that at this moment in history — with, among other things, this particular president in office — there is an opening for her to make the kind of issue-oriented songs [Loretta] Lynn became known for, Lambert is quick to dismiss the idea.”



While most celebrities are bemoaning our current political climate, music artist Joy Villa is proactively working to heal divided America through music. And her new hit single, ‘Make America Great Again,’ is doing exactly that.



It’s fair to say most people missed the Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Awards from March 11. That being said, the show was so trashy and off the charts, it made last year look tame by comparison. The hits included sexually-charged musical performances and drug use references. While Nick would argue that their target audience was eight or ten to 16, most watching were in the six to 14 age range.

 



Billboard magazine reports the 8th most popular song this week is from the 19-year-old Florida rapper calling himself Kodak Black. It's called "Tunnel Vision." The video includes the rapper standing in front of burning crosses and a scene of a Trump supporter wearing a Confederate-flag vest and a red hat that reads "MAKE AMERICA HATE AGAIN." He aims to shoot an unarmed black man (for sport?), but the gun jams. Subtlety is not a virtue to this "artist."  



Further ramping up his open opposition to President Trump's immigration law enforcement policies, Univision anchor Jorge Ramos has let loose with an outrageous tirade that could best be described as equal parts nationalistic identity politics, racially-driven demagoguery, and yet another instance of the irresponsible conflation of legal and illegal immigration.