It’s been a long time coming, but Disney finally committed to unveiling it’s very first official gay character. Exciting times, right? Well, for some, not quite. The news hasn’t been as exciting for the lefties against whitewashing and all things cultural appropriation, because actor Jack Whitehall is not gay.



From the “Liberals Spoil Everything” department, where everything is a problem, here’s Vice writer Harry Cheadle: “Celebrate the 40th Anniversary of 'Animal House' by Tossing It in the Trash -- Drunken frat boys don't seem so charming anymore, and the film's gender politics are fucked beyond repair.” From his 2018 perch, Cheadle tears into the offensive, vulgar, and extremely hilarious college comedy hit of 1978 for its general un-wokeness:."Animal House will never die. The question is, should it?"



Humans despoiling the planet is a common liberal Hollywood trope for movies. Comic-Con 2018 just delivered two new trailers with environmentalist themes including a monster movie that calls humans “the infection.” The annual San Diego event, which took place July 19-22, is known for buzzworthy announcements for TV and movies, and trailer releases. This year’s trailers included Aquaman and Godzilla: King of the Monsters. A commonality of those upcoming movies was the “humans are devastating the planet” plot points.



For a summer installment of the entertainment industry’s winners and losers, entries include a successful sequel to a hit Pixar movie having libertarian undertones, Rob Reiner’s latest liberal flop, and a kids’ cartoon of all things joining the grievance industry. And skip down below the first review to avoid spoilers regarding the plot of Incredibles 2!



CNN news anchor Jake Tapper is getting his Afghani war book turned into a Hollywood action flick with major tinseltown leading men signing on for the action. On Thursday, The Hollywood Reporter broke the news that several actors have been selected for the onscreen adaptation of The Outpost. The cast includes a few big names such as Orlando Bloom and Scott Eastwood, as well as up-and-coming Sharper Objects star, Taylor John Smith.

 


Washington Post chief film critic Ann Hornaday demonstrated a little too much feminist enthusiasm in her Friday article in the Style section. The headline was “And the summer box office’s big winner is . . . Ruth Bader Ginsburg?” CNN Films made a gushy Ginsburg documentary called RBG that has grossed two million dollars. Somehow, that makes her comparable to an Avengers movie.



These are interesting times for the legacy of Ulysses Simpson Grant. On the one hand, Ron Chernow’s 2017 biography started or furthered a reputational rehabilitation of the 18th president, whose administration was tainted with corruption (though Grant himself was never implicated).



Liberal movie critic Jeannette Catsoulis finally found an "earnest" political message movie she didn’t like -- one with a free-market libertarian bent that happens to match up with the Times’ outlier status as an editorial supporter of the Kelo decision (and, a beneficiary of similar eminent domain abuse). The enraging true story pit homeowner Susette Kelo against the town of New London, Conn., which condemned her private property in order to give it to another private owner, Pfizer, in the name of an economic development plan that failed. Yet Catsoulis turned up her nose at Kelo's plight and whined that such abuse of eminent domain may be "defensible" after all.



In a Friday New York Times op-ed, Neal Gabler, merely described as "writing a biography of Edward Kennedy" to feign neutrality, expressed alarm that "the despicable Kennedy" seen in Chappaquiddick "will eradicate the honorable if flawed real one." Anyone who knows the history, dramatically retold in the movie I saw, can only hope that the actually despicable Massachusetts senator accurately portrayed in the film makes the history books.



How far has the manipulative Kennedy dynasty fallen? Somehow, the movie Chappaquiddick was made with well-known actors, and distributed to movie theaters. Seven years ago, pressure caused the History Channel to deep-six a dramatic Kennedy miniseries (it ended up on the obscure cable channel Reelz). This movie is even drawing favorable reviews from the movie critics.



The Boston Globe's Ty Burr reviewed Chappaquiddick Tuesday, admonishing readers that the movie "might even be accurate." Burr claims that "I'll never know" what really happened the night Ted Kennedy drove off Chappaquiddick Island's Dike Road bridge and left Mary Jo Kopechne to die in his submerged car, "and neither will you." Besides, he insists, though Ted was "flawed but human," he had "endless accomplishments in the Senate."



Following Sunday night’s Academy Awards being filled with nasty left-wing political rhetoric, on NBC’s Megyn Kelly Today on Monday, anchor Megyn Kelly and her panel of guests absurdly praised the Oscars for being “pretty much free of partisan attacks.” Apparently they forgot how host Jimmy Kimmel set the tone of the night by declaring: “We make films to upset Mike Pence.”