When NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep isn’t offering gentle interviews to President Obama and comparing him to Abe Lincoln when interviewing his aides, he goes out and interviews journalists who say that Obama is “the greatest terrorist hunter in the history of the American presidency.”

The journalist was Jeffrey Goldberg of The Atlantic, who's written a very long 20,000-word opus on "The Obama Doctrine," and as usual, the president grants access in exchange for gush: 


On Monday’s Morning Edition, NPR media reporter David Folkenflik traveled to an old and faithful geyser of Donald Trump mockery: the late Spy magazine, the lefty satire rag run by Graydon Carter (now running Vanity Fair magazine) and Kurt Andersen (now hosting the pretentious arts program Studio 60 on NPR stations on the weekends). The magazine debuted in 1986 and died in 1998.

It is true that Spy had a special appetite for mocking Trump to the hilt….but it’s also true that Spy did some rather unforgettable mocking of the other frontrunner in the presidential race, Hillary Clinton. NPR never went there in a seven-minute Trump-bashing segment.


On Thursday’s Morning Edition, National Public Radio touted listening to “voices from around the world” and how they think about the American presidential election. They picked communist China, where a woman lectured the NPR audience that Donald Trump’s statements against immigration are “in conflict with American values.”


The Hill newspaper carried this headline on Monday: “Poll: Only 15 percent say they have benefited from ObamaCare.” Sarah Ferris reported just 15 percent of people say they have personally benefited from ObamaCare, although more than one-third believe it has helped the people of their state, according to an NPR poll released Monday, while 26 percent said they have been personally harmed .

That's not at all the way NPR reported its own poll on Monday.


NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is a big fan of President Obama, and when he interviews him, he helpfully sets him up. In a recent interview on race relations, Inskeep added little prompts instead of questions. That’s not what Ted Cruz received on Wednesday’s show. Inskeep was blunt when discussing the new Trump idea of banning Muslims from entering America: "Which Muslims do you want to keep out of the United States?"

NPR posted the full transcript online. What that demonstrated was that NPR and Inskeep routinely sliced out (for time and surely, for political convenience) Cruz whacking away at Democrats and explaining what's wrong with Islamism.


They were feeling Hillary Clinton's pain on Thursday's Morning Edition before the House special committee on Benghazi heard her testimony. Congressional correspondent Tamara Keith claimed Hillary's "what difference does it make" comment -- highly praised by the media at the time -- has been taken out of context by Clinton critics.

Back in 2013, NPR said Hillary suffered "not a scratch" and was now "fireproof" after Republicans tried to tangle with her in that previous Benghazi hearing.


As the Supreme Court term begins, NPR court correspondent Nina Totenberg played dumb on Monday’s Morning Edition, much like Adam Liptak at The New York Times. Why would conservatives dislike “consistently conservative” chief justice John Roberts?

Desperately employing rickety rationales twice to uphold Obamacare somehow doesn’t undermine “consistency.” Totenberg forgot Roberts being hailed by Time magazine in 2012 as similar to  Beethoven, Willie Mays, and King Solomon: “Not since King Solomon offered to split the baby has a judge engineered a slicker solution to a bitterly divisive dispute.”


On Saturday, NPR’s Weekend Edition celebrated atheist author Philip Pullman and the His Dark Materials trilogy he wrote for middle-schoolers, a sort of anti-Narnia series. Anchor Scott Simon celebrated the 20th anniversary of the first book in this trilogy and interviewed Pullman as he sat a BBC studio in Oxford, hinting they have "maybe the mark of real excellence."


The police-bashing community organizers known as the “Black Lives Matter” movement have a healthy contingent of completely biased black journalist/publicists. Gene Demby, brought into National Public Radio to agitate in the racial “Code Switch” project, wrote a 3,900-word essay for the NPR website and appeared on Friday’s Morning Edition to discuss how depressing it is to travel from cop victim to cop victim.

Anchor Steve Inskeep set Demby up to explain the toll of "How Black Reporters Report On Black Death" and why objectivity was a dishonest white construct on this taxpayer-funded network:


NPR Morning Edition anchor interviewed President Obama about just two topics: the Iran deal and race relations. On Wednesday’s morning show, Inskeep began with a question from the radical left – from black professor and MSNBC host Michael Eric Dyson – and then just prompted the president instead of really asking questions. 

Dyson wrote a column for The New York Times going after the usual allegedly racist suspects: “The right wing had made furious efforts to demonize him as a man unworthy of assuming the mantle of national leadership. The assaults from political figures who portrayed him as a cipher, or a monkey or, later, the police officers who cracked jokes at his expense, proved the toxic atmosphere.” That’s not the section Inskeep quoted. 


NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep was granted another interview with President Obama just before he left on another Martha’s Vineyard vacation, and the first story aired on Tuesday's Morning Edition, with a second on Tuesday night’s All Things Considered. The subject was limited to the Iran deal.

Despite the strange notion held by many liberals that NPR is a voice for civility in media and politics, Inskeep failed to ask the president about his controversial recent remarks in a speech at American University that “It’s those hardliners chanting ‘Death to America’ who have been most opposed to the deal. They're making common cause with the Republican Caucus.”


During Hillary Clinton’s first national interview on CNN Tuesday, the Democratic presidential candidate was pressed about her use of a private e-mail server during her time as Secretary of State, but both PBS and NPR ignored the topic during their post-interview coverage on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning.