NPR's Morning Edition on Monday zeroed in on a pro-life group's ongoing protest outside Kentucky's last abortion clinic. Correspondent Lisa Gillespie featured three pro-abortion activists during her report versus just one pro-lifer. Gillespie also let one of the abortion backers smear pro-lifers as potential terrorists. Vicki Saporta of the National Abortion Federation contended that prosecuting those who use the controversial tactic of blocking abortion clinic entrances prevents "the kinds of arsons, bombings, and murders that we've too often seen."


This sounds like a bad joke. While NPR is offering stories on how President Trump is corrupt enough for impeachment like Nixon the Sequel, they make time for stories about how American soldiers got PTSD because they formed a complex human bond with the prisoner they guarded before his hanging....Saddam Hussein. This actually happened. 

On Sunday morning, NPR posted an article by reporter Wade Goodwyn using the far-left Southern Poverty Law Center on "The Far Right's Language Explained." The inspiration for this article was the murder of two men in Portland who tried to defend a woman in a hijab on a subway train by an extremist named Jeremy Christian. 

Liberals generally avoid any reference to a "far left," since that would unfairly make Democrats sound synonymous with communists. But NPR had no problem using "far right" to describe murderous white nationalists on Sunday and the "Texas Freedom Caucus," a group of conservative Republican state legislators in Austin, on Saturday.


On Saturday morning's Weekend Edition, in the wake of the despicable bombing of the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, NPR host Scott Simon welcomed staunch atheist Richard Dawkins, author of (most notably) The God Delusion, to discuss the role of "religion" in terrorism. Simon tiptoed around singling out one particular religion as the most prone to terrorism in this century.


Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced on Tuesday that he will not run for reelection as the city's mayor because of mounting allegations that he sexually abused underage boys in the 1980s. Press coverage has either ignored Murray's Democratic Party affiliation or buried it in related stories' late paragraphs.

This outcome also exposes a double standard in the Evergreen State press, and should (but probably won't) lead management at these outlets, particularly at the Seattle Times, to question why they chose not to report multiple allegations against Murray which first surfaced almost a decade ago.


National Public Radio decided to greet the morning of Trump’s inauguration in the same way that it greeted the day after Trump’s surprising victory. They sought out black rage…in the person of author Attica Locke, who also writes for  the Fox drama Empire. She came to say this day marked “how much this country can’t stand black people,” and “doesn’t want Muslims here,” and “did not want a woman as leader.”


Every nonprofit group is ending the year with a pitch for last-minute tax-exempt contributions, and that includes National Public Radio. NPR fans received an e-mail with the subject line "Bold, unbiased journalism." That's pretty funny coming from a network that puts a loving touch on Barack Obama in interviews and never secured an interview with Donald Trump.

Bob Dole in 1996 and Mitt Romney in 2012 also skipped an NPR interview.  So every GOP challenger in the last 20 years except George W. Bush skipped public radio. Doesn't that speak volumes?


NPR's Morning Edition on Tuesday touted how many "anti-poverty advocates across the political spectrum" are now "worried" after President-Elect Donald Trump picked Dr. Ben Carson to be secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Correspondent Pam Fessler spotlighted how "advocates fear the worst — that it will lead to deep cuts in programs to reduce homelessness, and to subsidize affordable housing." However, Fessler didn't mention that her first "advocate" worked in the Obama administration, and the second donated to his presidential campaign.


Yet more evidence of a world turned upside down since Donald Trump won the presidency and charitable donations to the Clinton Foundation predictably plummeted -- National Public Radio is no longer a safe space for liberals to opine.

At least it wasn't early today for former congressman Barney Frank of Massachusetts, one of the main architects of the housing bubble that brought down the economy a decade ago and a man who has surprisingly managed to remain out of prison for his role in the debacle.

 


On Tuesday’s Morning Edition on National Public Radio, they turned to a liberal media eminence to explain just how easily Hillary Clinton is winning this election. Washington Post assistant managing editor David Maraniss was just an “Author” in their online headline. Armed with this authority, Maraniss proceeded to talk exactly like a hyperbolic MSNBC surrogate for the Clintons, claiming that Trump’s jail quip in the second debate proved Trump was “against everying about American democracy” and represented the view of a “tin-pot dictatorship in which politicians jail the other side.”


NPR's Morning Edition on Thursday donated four minutes of air time to pro-abortion group EMILY's List, and helped it promote its ad blitz to elect Hillary Clinton and other left-wing Democrats. Renee Montagne played a clip from one of the organization's ads, and gave its president, Stephanie Schriock, a platform to hype Mrs. Clinton as a "a champion for women and families."


On the 20th anniversary of Tupac Shakur’s death, NPR touted the rapper, who was gunned down in a drive-by shooting, for his “pro-feminist,” “pro-choice” music. Morning Edition’s Renee Montagne talked to journalist Kevin Powell about Tupac. Powell recommended Keep Ya Head Up, praising, “Here's a song that is really an ode to women. It's a pro-feminist song. He talks about being pro-choice in the song. He talks about being anti-street harassment in the song.”