NPR media reporter David Folkenflik shoveled his network's usual loads of disgust for Fox News in his coverage of Megyn Kelly's show getting canceled, allegedly over a discussion of racially insensitive Halloween costumes. "She really took on a lot of fire as a figure who brought on ideological baggage, who brought Fox News baggage." But Folkenflik didn't take this approach to MSNBC host Al Sharpton. 



Twenty years after he recommended to Congress that President Clinton be impeached for perjury and obstruction of justice, Kenneth Starr has written a book about it. Surely, with the passage of time and many other books exploring the Lewinsky affair and the other Clinton scandals, Starr can be treated with dignity and respect. Back then, he faced ABC’s Diane Sawyer calling his Starr Report “demented pornography,  pornography for Puritans.” Twenty years later, nothing has changed.



National Public Radio touts itself as an oasis of civility. But the calm tones of its announcers belie a dramatic liberal tilt. On Thursday's Morning Edition, longtime Supreme Court reporter Nina Totenberg touted the "quiet rage" and even "bad-assery" of Sen. Mazie Hirono, Democrat of Hawaii (lifetime American Conservative Union rating: 0.73 percent). She said to people who call her liberal, "F--- them."



Our friend David Rutz at the Washington Free Beacon found a frustrating/fascinating report by NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep in Gaza. He softly interviewed a 19-year-old Palestinian with a swastika kite. Inskeep said "they use it to discredit you," and the man responds "We want to burn them" (the Jews). If Inskeep were interviewing a 19-year-old neo-Nazi in Charlottesville with a swastika kite, it would probably be a slightly meaner interview than this gentle exchange:



Telemundo, una de las principales cadenas de habla hispana en la nación, está explotando los estereotipos al insinuar que algo anda mal con los latinos que se oponen a las políticas de santuario que buscan proteger de las autoridades federales a quienes viven en el país ilegalmente.



NPR Weekend Edition Saturday welcomed Parkland student leftist David Hogg for an interview, and host Scott Simon offered the typical "how are you coping" and "do you have time to be a teenager" softballs. But when he teed up Hogg to say something political, Hogg was obnoxious.



NPR couldn't be bothered to include pro-gun rights talking heads in their Monday coverage of boycotts targeting the National Rifle Association and gun manufacturers. Morning Edition featured pro-gun control activist Shannon Watts during their report on the "more than a dozen companies...cutting ties with the National Rifle Association." However, the program merely read an excerpt from a NRA statement responding to the corporate moves. Hours later, All Things Considered turned to two gun control supporters — California state treasurer John Chiang and Avery Gardiner of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence — during a segment on the anti-gun manufacturers campaign. The evening newscast followed its sister program's lead in leaving out gun rights suppporters from the report.



Your taxpayer-supported news producers at PBS and NPR are presenting their latest poll and pronouncing Trump’s first year flopped with the voters: 53 percent said Year One was a failure, while 45 percent picked Success.  

But break down the numbers by party, and the division is predictable: 87 percent of Democrats pronounced Trump a failure, and 87 percent of Republicans checked the success box. Among independents, it was 50 percent failure, 41 percent success, nine percent unsure.

Naturally, NPR didn’t go anywhere near breaking down the parties. Anchor David Greene and political analyst Domenico Montanaro underlined Bad News:



On National Public Radio on Saturday morning, Weekend Edition anchor Scott Simon interviewed Ed Martin, a pro-Trump author and Republican Party man, reveling in the Donald Trump-Steve Bannon feud. Simon claimed Bannon said the president has "lost it," meaning his mind. He asked Martin if he was "supporting a president who is incapable of being entrusted" with nuclear weapons?



In the midst of all the sexual harassment shockers emerging from the media, Hollywood, and politics, the Left is still hailing Anita Hill as the patron saint of sexual harassment. An especially egregious case unfolded on Thursday afternoon, as the NPR show Fresh Air with Terry Gross spent a half-hour re-litigating Clarence Thomas as a harasser with his old journalistic nemesis Jane Mayer (now with The New Yorker) and feminist author Rebecca Traister.The online summary was headlined “For Years, Anita Hill Was A 'Canary In The Coal Mine' For Women Speaking Out.” Only after they’d exhausted two-thirds of the hour on Hill-Thomas, did they turn to the harassment controversies that are not 26 years old.



On Wednesday morning, NPR's Morning Edition suddenly revisited Juanita Broaddrick's story as something that wasn't exactly disproved. Morning host Steve Inskeep brought on longtime Hillary Clinton spokesman Phillippe Reines to discuss his attack on Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), who turned on the Clintons and said Bill should have resigned in the wake of the Lewinsky scandal.



Friday's Morning Edition on NPR hyped two "far-right" protests planned in the San Francisco Bay Area on Saturday and Sunday. However, the public radio network improperly labeled Patriot Prayer, the group behind one of the demonstrations, as "alt-right." In fact, the controversial liberal Southern Poverty Law Center "does not list Patriot Prayer as such, nor is [founder Joey] Gibson considered an extremist," acccording to a Wednesday report from The Mercury News.