NPR has a series called "Off Script," where regular voters question the presidential candidates. On Wednesday's Morning Edition, they aired audio of an El Paso school teacher suggesting to Beto O' Rourke that his proposal to take away "assault weapons" from Americans through a "mandatory buyback" program won't pass constitutional muster, and will help the Republicans underline how Democrats oppose the Second Amendment. 



NPR's longtime loathing of Fox News approached Maximum Shamelessness on Friday night when NPR anchor Ari Shapiro suggested that Shepard Smith abruptly leaving Fox looked like "a purge based on purity." As if NPR has a pile of conservatives on staff for balance? In 2010, NPR fired Juan Williams for an appearance on Fox where he admitted he gets nervous when people wear Muslim garb on airplanes.



Paul Crookston at the Washington Free Beacon captured a sickening moment on NPR's Morning Edition on Tuesday. All Things Considered anchor Ailsa Chang traveled to Beijing for the 70th anniversary of iron-fisted Communist Party rule and was interviewed by morning host Steve Inskeep. Chang touted how Red China's record on poverty is "spectacular."



On Tuesday morning, syndicated talk-radio host Chris Plante mocked "National Panhandler Radio" for having some seriously high salaries for a taxpayer-subsidized network that begs for listener donations in pledge drives. Plante cited tweets by Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi from the latest IRS 990 form for nonprofits revealing the high salaries of NPR stars. Plante marveled first at Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon, who is a one-day-a-week anchor and yet made $479,578 -- a 16 percent pay hike. 



Democratic candidates generally don't have much to fear from interviews on National Public Radio, but Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep raised our eyebrows by pushing Beto O'Rourke a bit on Friday on what people will be forced to give up under liberal climate-change policies. The liberal media often focus on the Impending Crisis, and then go light on how liberals would crack down on "bad" behaviors.



On Tuesday's Morning Edition newscast, NPR host Steve Inskeep interviewed freshman Rep. Lauren Underwood, who narrowly defeated conservative Rep. Randy Hultgren in November. Inskeep touted how she's rare as a young black woman who represents a mostly-white district in suburbs and exurbs around Chicago. But boy, did she NOT want to talk about her fellow freshman Ilhan Omar. 



NPR's Morning Edition on Monday split its Andrew McCabe interview into two segments. On the home page they were promoting Russiagate: "Andrew McCabe, Ex-FBI Deputy, Describes 'Remarkable' Number Of Trump-Russia Contacts." On air, that segment never mentioned his lying under oath to the FBI. There was a second segment simply titled "Andrew McCabe Discusses His Firing." McCabe's answers were often refusals to answer, which Inskeep spun as "exceptionally careful." Kudos to NPR for trying to explore it, briefly. 



On Friday, the Ruth Bader Ginsburg biopic On The Basis of Sex expanded into more than 1,900 theaters. So the puff piece on Thursday's Morning Edition on NPR served like an informercial. NPR host Rachel Martin interviewed Felicity Jones (who plays Ginsburg) and director Mimi Leder. Jones gushed "Well, initially, I was very, very intimidated. And it's nerve-wracking paying such a beloved woman. And I, myself, am a huge, huge fan of her." Not discussed: where the film is Fake News.



NPR media reporter David Folkenflik shoveled his network's usual loads of disgust for Fox News in his coverage of Megyn Kelly's show getting canceled, allegedly over a discussion of racially insensitive Halloween costumes. "She really took on a lot of fire as a figure who brought on ideological baggage, who brought Fox News baggage." But Folkenflik didn't take this approach to MSNBC host Al Sharpton. 



Twenty years after he recommended to Congress that President Clinton be impeached for perjury and obstruction of justice, Kenneth Starr has written a book about it. Surely, with the passage of time and many other books exploring the Lewinsky affair and the other Clinton scandals, Starr can be treated with dignity and respect. Back then, he faced ABC’s Diane Sawyer calling his Starr Report “demented pornography,  pornography for Puritans.” Twenty years later, nothing has changed.



National Public Radio touts itself as an oasis of civility. But the calm tones of its announcers belie a dramatic liberal tilt. On Thursday's Morning Edition, longtime Supreme Court reporter Nina Totenberg touted the "quiet rage" and even "bad-assery" of Sen. Mazie Hirono, Democrat of Hawaii (lifetime American Conservative Union rating: 0.73 percent). She said to people who call her liberal, "F--- them."



Our friend David Rutz at the Washington Free Beacon found a frustrating/fascinating report by NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep in Gaza. He softly interviewed a 19-year-old Palestinian with a swastika kite. Inskeep said "they use it to discredit you," and the man responds "We want to burn them" (the Jews). If Inskeep were interviewing a 19-year-old neo-Nazi in Charlottesville with a swastika kite, it would probably be a slightly meaner interview than this gentle exchange: