New York Times reporter Nicholas Fandos hiked out to Montana to talk to Democratic Sen. Jon Tester of Montana for Monday’s edition. Tester, who may be tested in the fall as he’s up for re-election in a state Donald Trump carried by 20 points, was fawned over on his farm by Fandos, both in the main story, “Senate Democrat in Deep-Red Montana Isn’t Sweating Trump’s Threats,” and also an “Inside the Times” preview on page 2. Fandos painted a flattering picture of a folksy down-home Democrats who loved nothing better than messing about on the family farm.



More unseemly eagerness in Thursday’s New York Times to use the tragic murders in Parkland to help Democrats gain Congress, while weakening constitutional rights. Reporter Alan Blinder went to Helena, Montana searching out “red state” voters willing to reject the “iron rule” of supporting the National Rifle Association,  which is "hard line," shows "belligerence," and demands "lock-step loyalty."



On Saturday, Frank Miele, the managing editor of the Daily Inter Lake in Kalispell, Montana, recounted what he called an "unexpected chance to put my finger in the dike holding back the flood of fake news caused by those afflicted with Trump Derangement Syndrome." Miele acted on an "unfounded" story about one of President Donald Trump's tweets by the Associated Press's Darlene Superville, who "either misunderstood Trump’s tweet" about FBI Assistant Director Andrew McCabe or "intentionally lied about it."



Soopermexican at The Right Scoop caught an amazing admission in the midnight hour on Friday morning, as CNN was beginning to mourn another Democratic loss in a special election for the House of Representatives. Media reporter Dylan Byers lamented that voters in Montana weren't even really paying attention to their incessant coverage of GOP candidate Greg Gianforte's violent treatment of Ben Jacobs, a reporter for the leftist British newspaper The Guardian, on the night before the election.



On Friday's New Day on CNN, during a discussion in which panel members fretted over Republican reaction to GOP Rep.-elect Greg Gianforte violently attacking a reporter, The Atlantic's David Frum managed to inject race into the discussion as he theorized about what Rush Limbaugh would have done if Gianforte were a black Democrat. Frum: "Had the congressman been a black Democrat, imagine what Rush Limbaugh would have said. Rush Limbaugh called the attack 'studly' and 'manly.' Imagine -- it would have -- you would have had an explosion of racial provocation."

 



Longtime media bias observers know that if a Democrat wins a single special election race for national office during a Republican presidential administration, the press will say it's evidence that the nation's voters have changed their minds about which party should occupy the White House. If the Democrat loses ... well, in the pre-Internet era, the national press would pretend that the race never happened. These days, they instead have to come up with excuses, which are usually pathetic. The Associated Press engaged in such an exercise Friday morning after Republican Greg Gianforte defeated Democrat Rob Quist for Montana's single US House seat.



On Thursday morning, CNN’s New Day linked President Trump’s frequent criticism of the liberal media to Montana Congressional candidate Greg Gianforte’s violent incident with a reporter Wednesday evening. Appearing on the morning show, The Washington Post’s Karoun Demirjian whined: “You’ve got this kind of culture of, you know, reporters are the enemy going on and it depends. You see a lot of Democrats pointing the finger at the President right now. Saying you created, you helped create, at least, this culture where people..."



Guilt by association. That’s what Andrea Mitchell believes. Despite the fact that Donald Trump is on another continent, the Andrea Mitchell Reports anchor thinks that the assault against a journalist by a Republican congressional candidate is an “extension” of the President. Talking about Greg Gianforte’s attack on Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs, the MSNBC host connected, “There is so much hostility, frankly, to the press, a lot of it generated by the Donald Trump rallies.”



On Thursday's New Day on CNN, Chris Cuomo repeatedly tried to tie the national Republican party to Montana congressional candidate Greg Gianforte assaulting a reporter. After the CNN host unsuccessfully tried to get the reporter in question -- Ben Jacobs of The Guardian -- to make such a link, he then raised the issue in a later segment as he recalled a "ratcheting up of hostility towards the media" on the Right.



On Wednesday night, Montana Republican congressional candidate Greg Gianforte allegedly body slammed The Guardian’s Ben Jacobs the night before the state’s special election. Jacobs went to a hospital to be checked out and had his glasses smashed, so what’s known about the incident isn’t pretty to say the least. Importantly, any assault of anyone (reporter or non-reporter) isn’t okay. This should be common sense. That being said, the deranged reactions to the incident must be denounced too, most notably Washington Post supposedly right-leaning blogger Jennifer Rubin’s tirade on MSNBC’s All In.



Tuesday’s New York Times reporter Julie Turkewitz, who covers the “Rocky Mountain region” for the paper, is excited about Democratic prospects in a special election for the House in Montana. Her ostensible focus is Republican candidate Greg Gianforte, “Billionaire in Montana, Using Trump’s Playbook.” The online headline added: “What Scandal? In Montana Race, a Republican Is Following the Trump Playbook.” There is no major scandal attached to Gianforte’s campaign, but the headline writer went ahead and conflated them, as well as some silly "Russia ties" to make Gianfort appear more Trumpian.



To liberal media outlets, the saddest thing about abortion is how women seeking to terminate their baby may have to drive more than 20 minutes to a clinic. The Washington Post on Thursday offered a 2,390-word opus on a woman named Emily [last name sympathetically withheld] who procured an abortion in Missoula, Montana, driving 407 miles from Wyoming.

The headline was “The long drive to end a pregnancy.” The story took up two entire inside pages with a page of scenic color pictures along the drive, but no people in them. Post writer Monica Hesse lectured in large letters on the front of the Style section about the “geography of abortion” being too taxing in red states: