On Tuesday and Wednesday, Andrea Mitchell oddly claimed that President Donald Trump was using a "racial dog whistle" against Mississippi Democratic Senate nominee Mike Espy as the MSNBC host discussed Trump commenting that Espy's far-left politics do not "fit in" with his strongly conservative home state.



On Tuesday's Hardball, MSNBC host Chris Matthews demonstrated that there's no limit to how far liberals will stretch to faux-interpret coded language into the words of conservatives as he actually suggested that the use of the words "conservative values" in Mississippi are a coded reference to white supremacists in the state.



What happened at halftime of a high school football game at Brookhaven High School, in Jackson, Miss., this weekend may have been one of the darkest hours in Friday Night Lights history. Students from the visiting Forest Hill High School marching band staged a halftime skit in which students dressed up as doctors and nurses held other students dressed as SWAT team members at gunpoint. The Tribunist reports, "The move would be controversial at any game, but is even more shocking as two Brookhaven police officers were killed in the line of duty last week."



Friday on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, hosts Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough took their liberal panel on the road to do their live show from Oxford, Mississippi, interviewing both Republican and Democrat candidates running for Senate races in the state. Frequent MSNBC panelist Eddie Glaude exemplified the liberal media’s bias against conservatives by asking the same question to both Democrats and Republicans, but changing his question to include a nasty smear attack on the panel’s one Republican guest.



After Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant on Monday signed a groundbreaking new law that bans most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, the victory for the pro-life movement has received surprisingly little attention. FNC's Special Report with Bret Baier and the PBS NewsHour each ran briefs on Monday evening, and, on Tuesday, CBS This Morning ran one brief after CNN's Early Start show ran three briefs during the early morning hours between 4:00 a.m. and 6:00 a.m. ET.

 



Sometimes a report will come across the wire which forces to pause for a second to make sure that it actually happened. The latest example comes via Friday's Mega NoticieroIn short, a federal judge blocked Mississippi's Protecting Freedom of Conscience From Government Discrimination Act (HB 1523) before it went into effect.



This week’s edition of, “Let’s freak out over something completely irrelevant and meaningless in the sports world,” brings us into the realm of college football.

The Confederate Battle flag remains very much on the hit list of the left, and some on the right. Now the Stars n’ Bars finds itself in the crosshairs of the coaches at Ole Miss and Mississippi State.



The New York Times Magazine cover story by political correspondent Jim Rutenberg, "A Dream Undone -- Inside the 50-year campaign to roll back the Voting Rights Act," is a 10-part, 10,000-word doorstop (issued with the baleful threat "The first in a series") comparing current attempts to stop voter fraud as a return to Jim Crow, with particular focus on North Carolina. Rutenberg also relayed more Times misinformation about Ronald Reagan's 1980 campaign and his appeal to "states rights" in Mississippi.



A Google News search at 3 p.m. Eastern Time today for stories published in March about "Eva Carmichael" (in quotes; sorted by date) returned only 11 items.

Who is Eva Carmichael? She is a 94 year-old woman who was murdered in Meridian, Mississippi on March 1. Based on the complete lack of press coverage outside of the immediate area, it's reasonable to believe that the nation's journalists don't think, in the popular parlance, that "her life mattered" all that much. And why is that?



Ronan Farrow opened his MSNBC program Tuesday with these words: "Who can steal Magnolia State voters?" The opening words on the screen behind him were: "Mississippi Mud," followed by a chyron reading "Stealing the Magnolia State." Farrow's reporting quickly emphasized, several times, that the primary was a Republican one, and that it had gotten "nasty."
 
Several minutes followed, with NBC's Kasie Hunt reporting live from Hattiesburg, Mississippi, detailing the "really hard fought, really nasty" campaign between U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran, portrayed on the whole as a doddering figure, and strongly conservative challenger Chris McDaniel, portrayed as an insensitive extremist.



On her Saturday morning talk show on MSNBC, Melissa Harris-Perry launched into Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant for signing a “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” that allows religious people to practice their faith in the business world.

Harris-Perry not only attacked the GOP governor for enabling the “bigots” to “dehumanize” the LGBT lobby, but lectured that he can add “In God We Trust” to the state seal, but the state of Mississippi is horribly failing Jesus by being so behind in economic measurements (video below):



The third page of an unbylined report with an early Saturday time stamp credited to "USA Today" carried at the Jackson, Mississippi Clarion Ledger (like USAT, a Gannett Company) claimed that "Walmart heiress Alice Walton expressed solidarity with Walmart's striking workers."

Putting aside whether or not an action taken by what the company estimated may have been fifty associates is a "strike" or a "temper tantrum," the claim was not true. USA Today fell for a hoax. Following the jump are several paragraphs from the Clarion Ledger report and an LA Times writeup identifying the hoax. Additionally, I learned that Alice Walton's Crystal Bridges Museum was the object of Occupy and union movement protests when it opened a year ago.