On Thursday's New Day, CNN co-host Alisyn Camerota understated former Minnesota Democratic Senator Al Franken's history of sexual harassment as she asked Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar if she thinks he should run for Congress again.



As the dominant news media inform viewers of controversial police shooting cases in which there is debate about whether the officers acted lawfully, there has been a blatant double standard in spending substantially more time on victims who are black, even though blacks only make up a little more than one out of four suspects who are killed by police, with whites outnumbering blacks in the count by 2:1.

 



On Thursday, Minneapolis station WCCO reported on guns and crime in Minnesota. Anchor Frank Vascellaro's introduction: "More people are carrying guns than ever before, but the crime rate remains low." Imagine that.



As the three broadcast network evening newscasts on Friday informed viewers that former Minnesota police officer Jeronimo Yanez was found not guilty of committing manslaughter last year against black motorist Philando Castile, CBS conspicuously omitted two facets of the case that help explain why he was acquitted. More than a year ago, Castile was tragically shot to death by Officer Yanez after Castile -- who had a concealed carry permit and therefore no criminal record -- informed the officer that he possessed a firearm during a traffic stop. 



In what is clear reversion to form, Univision has chosen to air one-sided coverage that could best be described as Islamist apologia. The most recent instance comes in the wake of the terrorist attack at a shopping center in St. Cloud, Minnesota.



The front of the National section of Monday’s New York Times featured two race-and-ethnicity-charged reports from Minnesota and Virginia, one trying to corrode confidence in three Islamic terrorist convictions of Somalis in Minnesota, the other on a “Racially Charged Fight” over granting blanket voting rights to felons in Virginia, a move expected to benefit the Democratic nominee in November. Reporting from Minneapolis, reporters Jack Healy and Matt Furber’s story gave credence to far-left conspiracy theories right in the headline in “Fair or ‘Conspiracy’? Trial Divides Somalis in Minneapolis," while Sheryl Gay Stolberg happily followed a felon-turned-voting rights activist around Virginia helping enroll Democrats to vote.



Beginning early in 2014, shortly after its initial disastrous rollout, there has been a virtual blackout on anything resembling negative coverage of the "Affordable Care Act," aka Obamacare.

It hasn't been due to a lack of horror stories: plan cancellations, shocking rate increases, shrunken provider networks, co-ops going out of business, etc. It's because the nation's establishment press has worked mightily to minimize their exposure and to avoid dealing with their larger significance, calling them "glitches," "tricky situations" and the like, while mostly ignoring individual local nightmares. Now several Minnesota residents, clearly kept in the dark until now about something yours truly and several others on the center-right warned of in late 2013, have learned that Obamacare has saddled their children with tens of thousands of dollars in debt.



In a year-end interview with National Public Radio, President Barack Obama largely blamed "a saturation of news" coming from a media which "is pursuing ratings" for growing concerns in America over the ability of ISIS and other terrorists to conduct attacks on U.S. soil, and indicated that "it's up to the media to make a determination about how they want to cover things."

It's reasonable to believe that Obama was telling the press corps, which already works furiously to prop him up, that they need to cut back on their reporting of domestic terrorist activities, arrests and court proceedings. It seems fair to say that the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, quickly took that advice to heart in its selective coverage of the saga of Abdirizak Mohamed Warsame, and that its selectivity has kept a noteworthy story very quiet.



The "Pigs in a blanket. Fry 'em like bacon!" chant by Black Lives Matter activists this weekend at the Minnesota State Fair was taken out of context, an organizer told MSNBC's Chris Hayes tonight, insisting that the chant was sort of an inside joke, in a "playful" context between activists and the cops who were escorting the marchers. 



In some areas of the country, Planned Parenthood has gone on the offensive against local and regional news outlets in an attempt to minimize the exposure of damning undercover videos produced by the Center for Medical Progress. They are telling these outlets that the videos "should not be aired."

This is an attempt at corporate censorship which the establishment press would treat as important news if almost any other business — for-profit or not-for-profit — made such an attempt.



The "No More" TV advertisement blitz against domestic violence by professional athletes is obnoxious and reeks of political correctness. Exactly why does the public need to be indoctrinated about this, as if the audience for "Monday Night Football" is to blame? It's another reason to stop watching this sport.

But there is another reason to be opposed to this clearly political pressure campaign. In the current atmosphere, where even accusations of abuse are toxic public relations, what happens when a pro is falsely accused?



Julie Hirschfeld Davis's recent New York Times stories, featuring President Obama letting himself off the White House leash, have given the president free rein to mock in rambling fashion his Republican opponents in the runup to the congressional elections.

The trend continued in Wednesday's "Obama Urges Congress to Fund Infrastructure Projects," where Davis let Obama take several free shots at the GOP, with no counter-quotes from Republicans criticizing the president.