Miami Herald sportwriter and columnist Greg Cote, whose career has entered or is about to enter its third decade, seems to have incorporated a sideline into his work: glib, ignorant political commentary.

One such example surfaced at the end of his August 25 Random Evidence blog post. Apparently, Cote believes that anyone who has ever received any kind of government benefit or has made use of a government service at any time in their life is a flaming hypocrite if they believe that Uncle Sam and other public entities should be able to survive on less money than they currently spend. They're also hypocrites if they believe that the federal government has become far too intrusive in our everyday affairs and threatening to the fundamental freedoms identified in the naton's Constitution. Greg, who clearly should stick to sportwriting, has convinced himself that such people are "anti-government":



Columnist Leonard Pitts may not have caught wind of Thursday's Rasmussen poll before he wrote the column published Saturday at the Miami Herald. Perhaps he still doesn't realize that Rasmussen reported that 64 percent of blacks and 78 percent of likely U.S. voters overall say that "All lives matter" is closer to their own views than "Black lives matter."

In his column, Pitts accused what turns out to be a vast majority of Americans of all races of "moral cowardice" for holding that view. In doing so, he gave the (white guy George Soros-funded, co-led by a guy who his family says he is white) "Black Lives Matter" movement an undeserved pass for the radical lunacy it promotes to this day, while he absurdly argued that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. himself would likely be behind that movement (bolds are mine throughout this post):



This is a bit dated, but the Chris Matthews question is quite relevant. Last Friday on Hardball, Matthews asked Joy Reid: "Who's the Democrats' Ted Cruz?"

Reid's answer is extremely amusing, considering Reid was on the ground floor of the Obamessiah campaign, with Obamagasms like Time magazine claiming Obama was "born in the imagination, out of scraps of history and hope." Reid said the Democrats don't have the "authoritarian kind of impulse" of worshiping political figures: (Transcript and video below) 



Let’s look at the way the print media reacted to Pope Benedict XVI and Pope Francis after their first six months as pontiff.
 
We looked at the editorials in 15 of the nation’s largest newspapers to see what they said about the current pope, and his predecessor, after their first six months in office (Pope Francis will celebrate his first six months on September 13).



This has to be an imaginary story, right? Most Democrats and others on the left continue to insist that voter fraud is not a problem, even in the face of examples like Minnesota U.S. Senator Al Franken, whose 312-vote "victory" margin in 2008 may have entirely consisted (and then some) of illegal votes by felons in just one county.

More recently, it seems that the claim is under revision. A Democratic Party county chair, in a Cincinnati Enquirer story about three out-of-staters who voted or attempted to vote in Ohio,  is reported to have "long said there is no evidence of systemic fraud." Well, though they were were prevented from casting illegal ballots, a Florida Democratic congressman's chief of staff and his alleged cohorts definitely attempted large-scale "systemic" fraud last year. The Miami Herald, which played an important investigative role, had the story on Friday. A Google News search on relevant terms indicates that it's getting very little notice (15 items in total, most in Florida). Excerpts from Patricia Mazzei's Herald story follow the jump (bolds are mine):



It's rare that we take on liberal newspaper columnists. They're entitled to their opinions and no one expects them to adhere to a standard of objectivity. But on those occasions when a columnist transgresses the bounds of decency, we have to take note.

The Miami Herald's Leonard Pitts Jr. is one such opinion writer. In his November 17 column he argued some of the blame for a suicide in Key West, Florida, should be laid at the doorstep of conservative talk show hosts:



Remember the days when nightly news anchors were supposed to be serious journalists?  Apparently Brian Williams never got that memo.  Appearing on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart on August 15, the managing editor of NBC Nightly News showed the continuing decline of the gravitas of the broadcast news anchor. 

Appearing on The Daily Show, Williams continued his routine of making awkward and inappropriate comments that even Jon Stewart seemed uncomfortable with.  The NBC News veteran seems to find bestiality funny as he gleefully recalled anecdotes about his dog Qually to promote a segment on his primetime newsmagazine program Rock Center. 



While the national liberal media, particularly MSNBC, have been eager to portray Florida's efforts to remove noncitizens from its voter rolls as a "purge" that is really motivated by partisan attempts at "voter suppression," the Miami Herald reporter who's been covering the story as it develops seems to see it quite differently than his colleagues.

In his June 12 story, Marc Caputo notes (emphases mine):



Florida is a "state where a small number of ballots can swing a presidential race," MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell noted on her eponymous program this afternoon as she introduced Miami Herald's Marc Caputo to discuss Florida's attempt to "purge" its voter rolls of noncitizens.

But while Caputo noted that some 13 noncitizens -- who are of course ineligible to vote -- have been found and eliminated from the state's voter rolls thanks to the Sunshine State's efforts, Mitchell sought to present the inquiry as a waste of time because it's found so few noncitizens on the voter rolls thus far.



NPR's Greg Allen has dutifully joined others in the liberal media in presenting the liberal Democratic spin on Florida's efforts to remove noncitizens from its voter rolls as a heavy-handed "purge." As I noted yesterday, the so-called "purge" has amounted to just 0.02 percent of the state's voters being called to address discrepancies in their voter registration that suggest they are noncitizens.

Predictably, Allen seized on the Democrats' poster veteran, Bill Internicola, a 91-year-old Bronze Star recipient who was born in the Bronx and is, of course, a natural-born citizen. But of course Allen failed to inform listeners of NPR's Morning Edition that Internicola's citizen status was questioned by state officials perhaps because of a date-of-birth discrepancy between his voter registration and his driver's license. Noted the Miami Herald:



Despite all the huffing and puffing over Florida Senator Marco Rubio's alleged "embellishing" at the Washington Post, the fact is that his parents were Cuban exiles (meaning number 5 at link: "anyone separated from his or her country or home voluntarily or by force of circumstances"). That fact essentially undercuts everything about the WaPo article except the problem with the opening sentence of the biography at Rubio's Senate web site, which has been corrected.

That didn't stop two Associated Press writers, Brendan Farrington and Laura Wides-Munoz from doing quite a bit of embellishing of their own (a better word would be "mischaracterizing") in an item currently time-stamped early Saturday morning, while pretending that the rebuttal to the Post written by Mark Caputo at the Miami Herald doesn't exist. The AP pair's pathetic prose has two particular howlers which simply must be debunked.



In case you missed it, the Washington Post published a Birther-style hit piece on Thursday accusing Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fl.) of lying about when his parents moved from Cuba to Miami.

MSNBC's Chris Matthews invited the author, Manuel Roig-Franzia, to discuss his allegations on Friday's Hardball, and ended the segment by lauding over his guest, "You ought to get some kind of Pulitzer" (video follows with commentary):