The mandatory machine recount in Florida wrapped up Thursday to the joy of Congressman Ron DeSantis as he unofficially became governor-elect. DeSantis won by 0.4 percent over Democratic Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum. In spite of these facts, broadcast networks ABC and NBC, along with Spanish-language networks Telemundo and Univision, all refused to report DeSantis’s victory during their evening news programs.



The nation's leading Spanish-language television networks, Univision and Telemundo, continue to pay the price for doubling and tripling down on pushing unfettered immigration policies, and declining numbers have now led to layoffs and more.



In Florida, the Broward County Sheriff's office and Broward County school district are fighting to keep exterior surveillance video from the day of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School hidden from view. As journalists and citizens who've waged uphill battles against secrecy well know, government agencies too often invoke broad disclosure exemptions in the name of protecting public safety when they're really just trying to protect their own jobs.



Mayor Joy Cooper of Hallandale Beach, Florida, was forced to resign by Sunshine State Governor Rick Scott on Friday after her Thursday arrest on three felony charges: campaign finance violations, official misconduct and money laundering. At least four Florida news outlets have run reports failing to tag Cooper, who is accused of accepted illegal campaign finance checks from Russians, as a Democrat.



Horrible disasters like the recent Category-4 Hurricanes Harvey and Irma focus attention on heart-wrenching stories of lost lives, near misses and property destroyed in the storm or ravaged by looters. They also have an uncanny way of illustrating the many people who will pull together in a crisis and how the benefits of capitalism are often used to help those in need.



Columnist Leonard Pitts is the latest liberal to mock Wall Street Journal editor Gerard Baker for putting the brakes on calling Donald Trump a “liar” on Sunday’s Meet the Press. Somehow, a sense of caution on Trump utterances equates to Holocaust comparisons. Pitts began his column:

“Five minutes for Hitler, five minutes for the Jews.”



With just three weeks to go, major newspapers (with a circulation of at least 50,000) are walloping Donald Trump in their official endorsements, favoring Hillary Clinton by a count of 68 to zero. Out of a total of 82 newspapers that have offered an editorial on who their readers should vote for, 68 (83 percent) of them have endorsed Hillary Clinton, five (6 percent) recommended Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson, two (2 percent) advised to vote for anybody but Trump and seven (9 percent) newspapers offered no endorsement at all.



ESPN has had a hoot playing the role of sports Pravda during Barack Obama’s trip to Cuba.



Since this is a presidential election year, it's not surprising to find harsh comments and angry rhetoric regarding candidates running to occupy the White House next January.

However, Fabiola Santiago -- a columnist for the Miami Herald -- set a new low in an editorial that was published on Friday entitled “Ted Cruz & Marco Rubio aren’t the Cuban dream team.”



Humorist Dave Barry hammered the media on Wednesday's New Day for their "daily obsession with Donald Trump: "We keep asking why he's doing so well — and he's on TV all the time. He's on more than the GEICO gecko." When CNN's Alisyn Camerota defended the press coverage of Trump by using his front-runner status, Barry countered that "you can't deny the incredible impact...at this point, Kim Kardashian also could run for president and would do okay if we gave her the same level of coverage that we give to Donald Trump."



The media is attempting to ethnically vitiate Sen. Ted Cruz across multiple platforms and in different languages.



The Washington Post joins its GOP presidential forum partner, Univision, rehashing a 2011 narco-by-association smear of Marco Rubio.