In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter published on Thursday, CBS This Morning co-host Norah O’Donnell confessed that if she had known about Charlie Rose’s sexual harassment of women she probably would not have confronted him directly because he would have “screamed” at her.



On Thursday, NBC Today co-host Savannah Guthrie grilled Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshawi about his company's culture of sex harassment before he was hired, which she described as an "Animal House" environment. The Uber boss was too polite to suggest that Matt Lauer's team was probably not the ideal set of prosecutors on a hostile work environment.



Someone is finally crying foul over an evidence-free fake-news effort pushed by the same people who have promoted the Steele dossier for over a year. This time, the targets are the NRA and President Trump's 2016 victorious presidential campaign. In a Thursday Wall Street Journal column and a Friday Fox News appearance, Kimberley Strassel decried how the press has turned "the most outlandish accusation into 'news'" based only on "the whispers of a couple of Democratic lawmakers" and "an anonymous reference to the FBI."



A February 2017 ProPublica story claimed that Gina Haspel, nominated as CIA director this week, "was more deeply involved in the torture of Abu Zubaydah" at a secret Thailand prison "than has been publicly understood." Thursday evening, the group published a correction admitting that Haspel wasn't even present when one of the program's primary targets was, according to the New York Times, waterboarded 83 times.



After Wednesday’s NBC Nightly News, anchor Lester Holt and the entire staff marked the broadcast’s 70th anniversary and were even joined by former anchor Tom Brokaw. As TVNewser described it: “Producers, editors, and anchors, past and present, gathered in the NBC newsroom following Wednesday’s show to toast 70 years of NBC’s evening newscast, which began as the NBC Television Newsreel, a 10-minute program, on Feb. 16, 1948.”



On Monday, MSNBC’s Morning Joe opened with a video montage that combined clips from conservative media talking about the release of the FISA memo with footage of Geraldo Rivera opening Al Capone’s vault.



On Thursday, the panel on MSNBC’s Morning Joe dog piled Michael Wolff for propagating an unfounded rumor that President Trump had been having an affair with his ambassador to the U.N., Nikki Haley. The confrontation became so heated that the show’s co-anchor Mika Brzezinski eventually cut the interview short and asked Wolff to leave



On Thursday, USA Today headlined the possibility, with an accompanying video, that President Donald Trump might "be giving a speech to a empty room in Davos" on Friday. It didn't work out that way.



Twitter's #ReleaseTheMemo hashtag, referring to the four-page memo which allegedly contains evidence of extensive "abuse in ... surveillance practices" at the FBI and Department of Justice, has gotten on Beltway Democrats' nerves. An attempt to pass off Americans' interest in having it released as a campaign led by Russian bots appears to have blown up in their faces, because two of their leaders believed a bogus report from the far-left media fever swamp.



There is probably no better indicator that facts and the truth really don't matter to today's journalists than the fawning coverage disgraced former news anchor Dan Rather receives whenever he makes a post-CBS career move. CNN's story on Rather's latest foray into online broadcasting typifies the kid-glove treatment he has received since he was relieved of his anchor duties at CBS almost 13 years ago.



Grammy-winning singer and songwriter Seal bucked the trend of celebrities protecting themselves over the sexual assault cases rampant in Hollywood, particularly against disgraced bigwig producer Harvey Weinstein.



On Sunday's episode of Meet the Press, as he introduced a discussion about the establishment media's reputation at the end of 2017, it seemed that host Chuck Todd did not expect two of his panelists to try to pretend that the press's execrable year was actually one during which its reputation went "way up." But that's what Hal Boedeker, the Orlando Sentinel's "TV Guy," believes, as did NBC's own Claire Atkinson, who cited online subscription growth as her "evidence." Their statements constitute the comedy gold of cluelessness.