Eric Cochran worked at Pinterest for nearly two years, creating open-source code for a variety of apps. But with a June 24 op-ed in Newsweek, he’s exposing the censorship skeletons in the platform’s closet. Cochran says he was an idealist who “wanted to do good” with the technology he created. “I thought Pinterest could be different from its sibling tech giants. I hoped Pinterest might be a tech company that respected its users and was honest with them.”



On Monday’s Today show, co-host Savannah Guthrie talked to the cast of Showtime’s The Loudest Voice about their “damning portrayal” of late Fox News chief Roger Ailes in the new series. Guthrie’s disgraced former co-host Matt Lauer and NBC’s questionable handling of his years of alleged sexual harassment wasn’t mentioned during the lengthy segment.



With federal investigations looming and President Donald Trump making statements in favor of regulation, Big Tech companies like Google, Amazon, and Facebook are being forced to weigh their options.



The National Public Radio talk show 1A did an hour on new "restrictive" laws on abortion on Tuesday, but it was not a debate, it was a pro-abortion show. Substitute host Sasha-Ann Simons announced "we want today's conversation to focus on the impact and likely consequences of these laws. Our guests are here to answer your questions, not to debate the topic." The guests were two liberal journalists and an abortionist, who described she can "remove all the pregnancy tissue."



Peter Beinart’s March 15 article in The Atlantic, titled “Secular Democrats Are the New Normal,” seems both pleased that Democrats aren't mentioning God anymore and worried that this could hurt their electoral chances against President Donald Trump.



Dozens of prominent journalists are on their way to being sued for defamation according to Fox News. On FNC’s America’s Newsroom Tuesday, Doug McKelway reported that these journalists from just about every liberal outlet imaginable, are receiving preservation letters from Covington student Nick Sandmann’s lawyer. The letters order them to not destroy any reports or correspondences related to their coverage of the incident, which smeared the teens as racists.



It used to be that journalists didn’t need fire safety seminars to know they could get burned publishing stories that lacked facts or context. But when the original, deceptively edited video of Nathan Phillips and the Covington kids emerged, the press swaddled itself in oily rags, grabbed a Zippo and went full “Johnny Human Torch.”



After Kamala Harris called for the abolition of the private health insurance market on CNN, Monday, ABC and NBC’s morning shows on Tuesday skipped the 2020 Democratic presidential candidate telling Jake Tapper: “Let’s eliminate all of that. Let’s move on.” Private insurance currently covers 177 million people, so you think this might be controversial. However, only CBS This Morning bothered to mention it and only in a breezy, unconcerned way. In the 8am hour, co-host John Dickerson explained, “Kamala Harris says all Americans should have Medicare and it's time to move on from private insurance.”



Media reporter Jim Rutenberg’s column in Monday’s New York Times went after the National Enquirer for supposedly installing Donald Trump in the White House by withholding scandal dirt on him while throwing it at his opponents: “2016 Put Full Might Of a Tabloid On Display.” Curiously, Rutenberg didn’t come out against tabloid journalism per se, just its target; he would have preferred it to be directed toward hurting Donald Trump. The text box: “The Enquirer hid a story that seemed tailored to its mission.”



CBS This Morning ran a strange segment Monday morning about office party etiquette this holiday season with New York Times contributing writer Jennifer Weiner -- who awkwardly dragged Justice Kavanaugh’s accuser Christine Blasey Ford into it. As the left tends to do, Weiner made the concept of a Christmas party political, worrying that it just another way women would be sexually harassed for what they wear.

 


Fact: The Washington Post is anti-Trump. Scenario: a former Trump administration official writes an op-ed in the Post that contains an explosive accusation. When the press confronts Trump with allegation, he says “you have a sufficient journalistic ability to make a conclusion (Except Jim Acosta -- you’re fake news).” Then the White House goes silent on the issue, refusing comment. 



Since news broke on Friday of sexual harassment claims against both CBS CEO Les Moonves and longtime 60 Minutes executive producer Jeff Fager, the broadcast network has been in damage control. While CBS News provided full coverage of scandal, reporter Anna Werner made sure to tout the company line that the accusations may just be a case of “corporate hardball” as CBS fights off an attempt to re-merge with its former parent company Viacom.