In early March, Tim Graham at NewsBusters noted that CNN's February audience fell by 19 percent from February 2017. Full first-quarter cable TV ratings released this week show serious year-over-year declines not only at CNN, but also at ESPN, which has continued to push politically correct causes. Perhaps CNN's Jeffrey Tucker should consider the shortcomings in his network's programming instead of immaturely tagging Fox News, which remained in first place by a significant margin, as "state-run TV."



Tuesday, the Washington Post, whose motto since February 2017 has been "Democracy Dies in Darkness," gave precious access to a supporter of Xi Jinping's consolidation of power in mainland China. "Shanghai venture capitalist" Eric X. Li also taunted the West, claiming that "liberal democracy in its current state seems incapable of producing a leader half as good."



On Friday, all three network morning shows touted Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student and gun control activist David Hogg demanding that advertisers pull their sponsorship of Laura Ingraham’s Fox News show after she mocked him on Twitter – for which she has apologized. However, missing from all the hand-wringing about civility was any acknowledgment that Hogg and several other student activists have repeatedly used media appearances to hurl vile attacks against anyone who disagrees with them.



To offer a corporate tribute to  a national school walkout for gun-control measures, Viacom -- which owns several major cable networks -- "will suspend regularly scheduled programming for 17 minutes" at 10 am on Wednesday. Liberal student activists will take over MTV's Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat accounts. MTV, VH1, Logo, Comedy Central will have orange (the color of gun violence prevention) logos until the "March for Our Lives" on March 24.



Despite widespread praise when first purchasing his newspaper empire, liberal billionaire Warren Buffett’s company Berkshire Hathaway is slashing media jobs by 6 percent — after cutting hundreds of jobs last year, according to Bloomberg.



On Tuesday, all three network morning shows fretted over the Justice Department filing a lawsuit to block a planned merger between telecommunications giants AT&T and Time Warner. Hosts and correspondents warned of “politics” being “at play” in the decision and touted how critics were “raising concerns about the motive behind the government’s legal challenge.”



The Left is incessantly freaking about all sorts of things - about which very little freaking is actually necessary. The Media is - by-and-large - the Left’s megaphone. About whatever the Left is freaking - you’ll find the Media freaking. Only louder, with many, MANY more outlets with which to amplify the freaking. The advent of the Internet - has exponentially increased the number of outlets through which the Media can freak. 



The unease among advertisers over falling National Football League TV ratings is starting to boil over. One of the league's major sponsors is considering pulling the plug on its NFL advertising next year, and, according to Business Insider's Mike Shields, other "brands are threatening to pull ads from NFL coverage if NBC keeps covering players' national-anthem protests." If those ad dollars go away, technological shifts may cause advertisers to decide not to return.



In recent months, it has become quite obvious that the Associated Press has made conscious moves designed to make its output and journalistic operations less transparent. It's also reasonable to ask whether these moves are also motivated by a desire to hide what appears to be a significant shrinkage in its available resources and perhaps even its number of personnel.



Here's a toast to you, Mean Joe Green and Jack Lambert. These two Pittsburgh Steelers' champions from the 1970s, would not have tolerated the un-American protests spawned by Colin Kaepernick. Their teammate, Franco Harris, told Mediate's John Ziegler so in a podcast interview this week.



Alex Griswold at The Washington Free Beacon relayed that The Huffington Post -- a bit notorious on the Left for not paying writers for content -- published a piece from a Washington Post reporter criticizing Post owner Jeffrey Bezos for underpaying workers. "Jeff Bezos Wants to Give More Money to Charity. He Should Pay His Workers First," wrote Fredrick Kunkle, who is also a co-chair of the Washington-Baltimore News Guild's bargaining unit at the Post.



Sarah Palin’s defamation lawsuit against The New York Times was thrown out on Tuesday, not because the Times didn’t recklessly accuse Palin of inciting the shooting of Gabrielle Giffords. It’s because by the standards of standing libel law, one has to find “malice,” which is much harder to prove than the false statement of the Times.